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GAA Fall Training September, 2011. Training Components Read and understand the 2011-12 GAA Examiner’s Manual Be familiar with the Blueprint and the Curriculum.

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Presentation on theme: "GAA Fall Training September, 2011. Training Components Read and understand the 2011-12 GAA Examiner’s Manual Be familiar with the Blueprint and the Curriculum."— Presentation transcript:

1 GAA Fall Training September, 2011

2 Training Components Read and understand the 2011-12 GAA Examiner’s Manual Be familiar with the Blueprint and the Curriculum Standards Access the online GPS resources and webinars Access the onlineGAA Resource Board View archived DOE Elluminates online View current DOE presentations online

3 Read and Understand the GAA Examiner’s Manual Every teacher should have received a hard copy of the 2011-12 Examiner’s manual If you have not yet received a copy, contact your test coordinator Once you’ve read the manual, download and sign the verification form from the special education website and send it in the courier to me at Werz by September 30 th.

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5 GAA Website All DOE electronic forms/resources have now been posted on the special education website

6 CCSS GAA Calendar The GAA Calendar consists of self-imposed deadlines to help keep everyone on track Many teachers finish both collections long before the deadline ~ continue to do so! It’s understood that student illnesses may affect your ability to adhere to the deadlines You do not have to wait to schedule a review if you are finished with a collection

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8 Grade Level Blueprints and Curriculum Standards Familiarize yourself with the Blueprint and Curriculum Standards for each grade level to be assessed before completing your planning sheets These are available online and in Appendix D & E of the Examiner’s Manual

9 Access GPS resources and webinars online https://www.georgiastandards.org/standards/pa ges/BrowseStandards/GPS-Impairment.aspx Become familiar with the standards/elements Understand the “Big Ideas” and “Key Concepts” for each standard and element Get suggestions from content teachers at your school

10 Access GPS resources and webinars online (cont)

11 http://admin.doe.k12.ga.us/gadoe/sla/ag ps.nsf User name (full email address) Password (unique –assigned by DOE) Contact Terri Baggarly if you do not have access to the board or have misplaced your password Access the GAA Resource Board Online

12 Access the GAA Resource Board online (cont) The Resource Board contains: Free downloadable activities and materials for use with students with significant cognitive disabilities across grade levels and curricular areas Resources (internet, literature, etc.) to provide access to the general education curriculum Student and classroom success stories Adapted stories for all grade levels and directions on acquiring adapted literature Instructions for acquiring adapted books Instructional strategies and best practice guidelines Data Sheets Question & Answer section for teachers to post questions and receive responses Georgia Alternate Assessment (GAA) suggestions/tips Georgia Project for Assistive Technology (GPAT) information Activities and materials for High School Access Courses

13 View archived DOE Elluminate sessions online http://www.gadoe.org/ci_exceptional.aspx?PageReq=CIEXCElluminate Suggested archived webinars: Giving Access to the Math Standards - Math Concepts and Relevant Life Skills for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities, September 10, 2009 Giving Access to English Language Arts Standards - Listening Speaking and Viewing, Writing, and Reading for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities, October 8, 2009 Giving Access to Science Standards - Linking Science and Life Skills and Experiences, November 5, 2009 Giving Access to Social Studies Standards - Relating Themes in Social Studies to Relevant Life Skills and Experiences, December 10, 2009 Access to ELA - Writing Skills for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities, January 24, 2011

14 http://www.gadoe.org/ci_exceptional.aspx?PageReq =CIEXCElluminate Click “Recordings” Select month and year Select requested session Enter email address and name Click play While viewing, you may pause, rewind, and fast forward View archived DOE Elluminate sessions online (cont)

15 View current DOE presentations online http://www.doe.k12.ga.us/ci_testing.asp x?PageReq=CI_TESTING_GAA Available in the GAA Presentations Portlet Right side Click “more” to access all available presentations

16 Presentations Portlet View current DOE presentations online (cont)

17 2011-12 Changes Two different Student Demographic Information Forms (SDIF) will be used this year SDIF for grades K and 3-8 Tan Form SDIF for High School (regular administration and retesters) Orange Form

18 2011-12 Changes (cont.) Retest Info There are no preprinted student labels (that go on the SDIFs) for re-tests Must complete “box L” on SDIF Bubble in each retest subject Skip box L for all other students

19 2011-12 Changes High School Retest Students who entered high school in fall, 2008 and later who are pursuing a regular education diploma, who are assessed on the GAA and do not achieve a proficient score in one or more content areas, will be offered retest opportunities beginning in 2011-2012.

20 2011-12 Changes High School Retest (cont) Retesting is required only in the content area(s) for which the student achieved a proficiency level of Emerging Progress (not proficient). For each content area requiring a retest, both entries for the content area must be submitted. If the student was not proficient due to receiving a “1” in Generalization, he/she must be retested in all 4 content areas.

21 2011-12 Changes High School Retest (cont) The Grade 11 Retest Options: Retest Option 1: Administration begins on 9/6/11; High School portfolios are returned to Questar by 11/11/11. System will receive scores the week of 1/13/2012. Coweta will use Option #1. Retest Option 2: Administration begins on 9/6/11; High School portfolios are returned to Questar by 3/30/12. System will receive scores the week of 6/1/12. Retest Option 3: Administration begins on 1/9/12; High School portfolios are returned to Questar by 3/30/12. System will receive scores the week of 6/1/12.

22 2011-12 Changes High School Retest (cont) You must utilize the BLACK PORTFOLIO BINDERS when administering the High School Retest. Be certain to use the Student Demographic Information Form designated High School. Pre-ID Labels ARE NOT used for the High School Retest. You must hand bubble all information requested on the High School SDIF if the student is a retester. You must mark the content area(s) in which the student is retesting as required in Box L.

23 2011-12 Changes High School Math The mathematics courses to be assessed for the GAA must be selected based upon the high school math course offerings designated by the local system. Integrated courses for Math I and Math II or Discrete courses for GPS Algebra and GPS Geometry

24 2011-12 Changes High School Math (cont) It is a requirement that both mathematics entries on which a student is assessed come from the same course. If taking the integrated courses, the student must be assessed on Math I and Math II. If taking the discrete courses, the student must be assessed on GPS Algebra and GPS Geometry.

25 2011-12 Changes High School Math (cont) DO NOT assess students on any combination of integrated and discrete courses! For example: A student who is assessed on Math I for the first mathematics entry and on GPS Geometry for the second mathematics entry will receive a nonscorable code for the second mathematics entry. This will result in a nonscorable entry.

26 2011-12 Changes High School Math (cont) Integrated Math Math I and Math II

27 2011-12 Changes High School Math (cont) Discrete Math GPS Algebra & GPS Geometry

28 1 st and 2 nd Grade Changes The 1 st and 2 nd Grade GAA participation requirement was removed beginning with the 2010-11 school year with the discontinuation of CRCT for those grades. Most students were given local Benchmark assessments since those are required of all 1 st and 2 nd graders across the county. Many felt that the Benchmark held little meaning for select students, even with maximum appropriate accommodations, and an alternative was requested.

29 1 st and 2 nd Grade Changes (cont) Beginning with the 2011-12 school year, IEP Teams will have the flexibility to recommend participation in a “Mock GAA” for those 1 st and 2 nd graders who the team determines the Benchmark assessment, even with maximum appropriate accommodations, is inappropriate This is an IEP Team decision and should be treated and documented in the IEP as such

30 1 st and 2 nd Grade Changes (cont) What is a “Mock GAA”? Selection of 1 ELA Standard and 1 Math Standard to assess throughout the course of the year 1 st and 2 nd grade standards are available at www.georgiastandards.org or on the CCSS GAA web page www.georgiastandards.org Follow the same collection criteria and timeline as the formal GAA Mock GAA Entry sheets will be posted on the website All other formal GAA forms may be used (annotation, observation, interview, data sheet) Labels will not be required Planning sheets will not be required A file folder may serve as the binder

31 1 st and 2 nd Grade Changes (cont) Mock GAAs are considered informal assessments Hand-written entry sheets, etc., are acceptable Scoring will be completed locally by teachers, test coordinators, and consultants after the regular GAAs leave the system Participation in the Mock GAA satisfies the IDEA requirement that systems mandating assessments for all students in a grade level (such as Benchmarks) provide an alternative for students with disabilities, when needed.

32 2011-12 Changes (cont.) Teachers who have previously administered the GAA will be given 2 work days to be used during the year to work on GAA documentation requirements The work days should be scheduled in cooperation with your school administration to avoid conflicts The special education department will pay for substitute teachers Direct questions to Terri Baggarly

33 How did we do? GEORGIA STATEWIDE (All Grades): ELA: 89% Established or Extending Progress Mathematics: 92% Established or Extending Progress Science: 98% Established or Extending Progress Social Studies: 98% Established or Extending Progress

34 How did we do? (cont) COWETA COUNTY (All grades): ELA: 91% Established or Extending Progress Mathematics: 92% Established or Extending Progress Science: 97% Established or Extending Progress Social Studies: 99% Established or Extending Progress

35 Nonscorable Entries Statewide 2010-11 NS CodeNumberPercent of NS Percent of all entries ME771.63%0.13% ES491.04%0.08% NA3,36971.44%5.68% IE1,03121.86%1.74% IT1433.03%0.24% OG80.17%0.01% IS390.83%0.07% Total 4,716 of 59,288 Entries 100%7.95%

36 Nonscorable Entries Coweta Co 2010-11 NS Code Number of NS Entries Percent of NS Percent of all entries ME00% ES00% NA4291.30%4.72% IE36.52%0.34% IT00% OG00% IS12.17%0.11% Total 46 of 890 Entries 100%5.17%

37 2011-12 GaDOE GAA Training Focus The GaDOE Testing Division and Special Education Services and Supports Division used results to guide the training focus for this year Several key areas were identified as ongoing weaknesses to be addressed throughout the year in GaDOE Elluminate sessions

38 Understanding of the “intent” of each standard/element assessed Clearing up the misunderstanding of what constitutes a prerequisite skill Instructional vs. Assessment tasks Alignment of tasks to the standard and element Clear and concise documentation 2011-12 GaDOE GAA Training Focus (cont)

39 The GaDOE Testing Division and Intellectual Disabilities Program Manager, along with Questar, did an excellent job of explaining and providing specific, relevant examples of the preceeding training points At this time, all teachers will need to access the GaDOE Elluminate and follow the instructions to view that portion of their presentation 2011-12 GaDOE GAA Training Focus (cont)

40 Providing Learning Opportunities through Instruction Teach, then Assess! 40

41 Giving Students Opportunities to Learn The purpose of the GAA is to measure student achievement and progress relative to selected skills that are aligned to grade level GPS. The expectations can be different in terms of depth and/or complexity. Assistive technology and adapted materials may be needed to give access. The focus may be on prerequisite skills, but must apply to the grade level content and standard. The level of instruction must be appropriately challenging for each individual student. 41

42 Giving Students Opportunities to Learn Access to the curriculum should be a part of ongoing instruction and should not be limited to singular events represented by the assessment tasks on the GAA. It is vital that students participate in instructional activities prior to assessment in order to give the students the greatest opportunity to learn and retain knowledge and skills related to the academic curriculum. 42

43 Georgia Performance Standards Instructional Practices and Resources Opportunities to Learn Georgia Alternate Assessment 43

44 Understanding the GPS In order to best serve our students, it is vital that teachers are provided with the necessary resources and training opportunities to enable them to understand the Big Ideas of the GPS standards and elements. Big Ideas are key concepts– the intent of the standard and element. Look for big ideas in key nouns found in the standard and element 44

45 Teach first, then Assess! 45 Lear n Teac h Assess Lear n Teac h Asse ss GAA Collection Period 1 Collection Period 2

46 Teach first, then Assess! Opportunities for learning Exposure to materials Activities for learning and practice Assessment Student demonstrates what they know about the content and meaning of the standard and element Teaching Exposure Practice What I have learned How I show you Assessment 46

47 Access to the curriculum should be a part of ongoing instruction. not a single task/event used as an assessment task for GAA Students participate in instructional activities prior to assessment to allow opportunities for learning concepts and skills related to the standards. Teach first, then Assess! 47

48 Teach, then Assess! The opportunity to learn via the academic curriculum should be provided throughout the school year. Ongoing academic instruction should provide access to a variety of standards from the curriculum–not just those assessed on the GAA. Instruction between collection periods which will allow students to demonstrate the greatest amount of progress in the standards and elements on which they were assessed. 48

49 Teach, then Assess! The student’s knowledge, as demonstrated through Collection Period 1 evidence, demonstrates the student’s initial skill on a task that clearly connects to the intent of the standard and element. Assessment tasks for Collection Period 1 may occur: After introductory lessons At the end of a unit Prior to teaching a new unit that builds on previous skills 49

50 Teach, then Assess! Additional tasks that provide exposure or practice with vocabulary or concepts related to the standards can be done for instructional purposes, but should not be used for assessment purposes. Example: a Bingo activity may provide additional practice with vocabulary related to the Civil War but is not an assessment of knowledge of the standard. 50

51 Teach, then Assess! Consider the following: Matching vocabulary words such as measure, point, and distance before the student determines the distance between two points Learning to read a map key or compass rose before locating GA on a map Identifying,= symbols before using them to compare numbers Word searches, crossword puzzles, word banks that expose students to the concepts of character, plot, and setting 51

52 Teach, then Assess! The preceding tasks could be helpful to familiarize the student with the terms, materials, and concepts used to access the standard. However, the tasks DO NOT, in and of themselves, constitute aligned tasks. 52

53 Teach, then Assess! Matching vocabulary words such as measure, point, and distance before the student determines the distance between two points. Matching vocabulary is not necessary for measurement. E.g., a student can measure by comparison and matching. 53

54 Teach, then Assess! Learning to read a map key or compass rose before locating GA on a map Georgia can be located without a map key or knowledge of a compass rose 54

55 Teach, then Assess! Identifying,= symbols before using them to compare numbers Math symbol recognition is not necessary to compare numbers. The symbols can be learned while addition is being practiced, but it is not a prerequisite skill. 55

56 Teach, then Assess! Word searches, crossword puzzles, word banks that expose students to the concepts of character, plot, and setting. Students should show differentiated responses that give an indication of understanding. 56

57 Alignment Scenarios Alignment through prerequisite skills The intent of the standard and element

58 Alignment through Prerequisite Skills Instructional tasks submitted for the assessment can focus on prerequisite skills that allow the student to be exposed to and assessed on the standard/element at a level that is meaningful and purposeful for the student. Prerequisite skills must still focus on the intent of the grade level standard and element. 58

59 Prerequisite Skills A Prerequisite Skill is one that is essential to the acquisition of the standard and element Addresses the intent of the standard and element being assessed 59

60 Is it a Prerequisite Skill? To determine if a skill is truly a prerequisite to learning the targeted skill, the following questions should be asked : 1. Can working on this skill eventually lead to the skill targeted by the element (at a less complex level)? 2. Is the skill prerequisite for the intent of the standard and element? 3. Should acquisition of the skill be part of the instruction that precedes the assessment? 60

61 Is it a Prerequisite Skill? M3N5 c. Understand the fraction a/b represents a equal sized parts of a whole that is divided into b equal sized parts. Student is identifying numbers through matching. 1. Does number identification alone ever get the student closer to an understanding of fractions? NO 2. A student has to be able to identify number representations only if the task is designed using fractional numbers. 3. In this case, number identification is not a prerequisite for this standard and element; it could be a part of the ongoing instruction that precedes the assessment via this particular task. 61

62 Is it a Prerequisite Skill? M3N5 c. Understand the fraction a/b represents a equal sized parts of a whole that is divided into b equal sized parts. Student is using manipulatives to demonstrate fractional representation based on parts of a whole. 1. Can repeated exposure to parts of a whole ever get the student closer to an understanding of fractions? YES 2. This skill is a prerequisite as it addresses the intent of the standard and element. 3. This could be a part of ongoing instruction both before and after the baseline task is presented as a means of familiarizing the student with the terms, materials, and concepts necessary to access the standard and to show progress. 62

63 Is it a Prerequisite Skill? S4E3 a. Demonstrate how water changes states from solid (ice) to liquid (water) to gas (water vapor/steam) and changes from gas to liquid to solid. Student is working on identifying different states of water (solid/ice and liquid/water). 1. Can repeated exposure to ice and water get the student closer to an understanding of how water changes to different states. Yes 2. This skill is a prerequisite as it addresses the intent of the standard and element. 3. This could be a part of ongoing instruction both before and after the baseline task is presented as a means of familiarizing the student with the terms, materials, and concepts necessary to access the standard and to show progress. 63

64 What is Alignment? Alignment is the connection between the written, taught, and tested curriculum*. The connection must be to grade-level academic standards. Assessment tasks can be decreased in depth, breadth, and complexity but must still connect back to the intent of the standard and element being assessed. *Diane Browder, UNCC, 2006 64

65 Validation Check for Alignment When looking at the skill in isolation, can you still identify the academic domain? Could a curriculum content expert link it back to the specific state standard? Has the intent of the element been addressed? Do all four assessment tasks align to the standard and element? Have opportunities for teaching and learning aligned to the assessed content been provided? 65

66 The Intent of the Standard and Element The intent of the standard and element refers to the “Big Idea” that which they were designed to teach. E.g., ELA6LSV1 (b) Displays appropriate turn taking behaviors The intent of this LSV standard is for the student to display appropriate turn-taking behaviors during student-to-teacher, student-to-student, and group verbal interactions. 66

67 The Intent of the Standard and Element Do the following tasks address the intent of this LSV standard and element? Waiting in line for a turn at the drinking fountain Participating in a conversation about your weekend Playing a game of catch Responding to questions about your likes and dislikes NO YES NO YES 67

68 The Intent of the Standard and Element What is the intent of the following standard? E.g., S5P2 (c) Investigate the properties of a substance before, during, and after a chemical reaction to find evidence of change. The intent of this Physical Science standard is for the student to recognize the effects of a chemical reaction. 68

69 The Intent of the Standard and Element Do the following tasks address the intent of this Physical Science standard and element? Baking brownies for a bake sale Recognizing that the brownies changed states after baking; stating that heat caused chemical reaction Making iced tea while working in the school cafeteria Recognizing that tarnished pennies soaked in lemon juice become shiny again, while pennies soaked in water do not NO YES NO YES 69

70 Alignment Scenarios Example 1: Georgia Studies Economic Understandings SS8E5 – The student will explain personal money management choices in terms of income, spending, credit, saving, and investing. What is the intent of this standard? What are some ways this standard can be accessed by students with significant cognitive disabilities (SWSD)? Consider the following examples: 70

71 71

72 “N completed a worksheet where she had to identify coins and dollar bills by name.”

73 Alignment Scenarios When looking at the skill in isolation, can you identify the academic domain? NO Could a curriculum expert link it back to the standard? NO Has the intent of the standard been addressed? NO Is this a prerequisite skill for this task? This skill is NOT a prerequisite for access to this standard. The task is NOT aligned. 73

74 “N was required to make a purchase, calculate her change, and stay within her budget.” This task was submitted for the same student for Collection Period 2. 74

75 Alignment Scenarios When looking at the skill in isolation, can you identify the academic domain? YES Could a curriculum expert link it back to the standard? YES Has the intent of the standard been addressed? YES Is this a prerequisite skill for this task? This is an aligned task. 75

76 Alignment Scenarios Example 2: Data Analysis and Probability MM1D1– Students will determine the number of outcomes related to a given event. (a) Apply the addition and multiplication principles of counting. What is the intent of this standard and element? What are some ways this standard can be accessed by students with significant cognitive disabilities (SWSD)? 76

77 77

78 “The student was given a worksheet with single digit addition symbols/facts. The student was instructed to count the pictures to write the correct number to compute the addition problems.” 78

79 Alignment Scenarios When looking at the skill in isolation, can you identify the academic domain? YES Could a curriculum expert link it back to the standard? NO Has the intent of the standard been addressed? NO Is this a prerequisite skill needed for this task? This skill is NOT a prerequisite for access to this standard. The task is NOT aligned. 79

80 “The student was given a worksheet with two digit addition by one and two digits. The student was instructed to compute the addition problems.” 80

81 Alignment Scenarios When looking at the skill in isolation, can you identify the academic domain? YES Could a curriculum expert link it back to the standard? NO Has the intent of the standard been addressed? NO Is this a prerequisite skill for this task? This skill is NOT a prerequisite for access to this standard. The task is NOT aligned. 81

82 Alignment Scenarios Example 3: Data Analysis and Probability MM1D1– Students will determine the number of outcomes related to a given event. (a) Apply the addition and multiplication principles of counting. The following task addresses the addition and multiplication principles of counting by adding the possible number of outcomes based on the combination of events…in a simplified way. 82

83 “K will determine the number of possible outcomes when making sandwiches with two types of bread and two kinds of meat.” 83

84 Alignment Scenarios When looking at the skill in isolation, can you identify the academic domain? YES Could a curriculum expert link it back to the standard? YES Has the intent of the standard been addressed? YES Is this a prerequisite skill for this task? This is an aligned task. 84

85 The Dos and Don’ts of Documentation Less Can Be More

86 The Dos and Don’ts of Documentation When reviewing evidence documentation, the teacher and portfolio reviewer must ask him or herself the following questions: What, specifically, was the student asked to do as it aligns to the standard and element? What were the actual questions/actions asked of the student? What were the student’s answers? How did he/she respond? Were the answers/responses correct? Has evaluation of student performance by the teacher been clearly documented? What was the type and frequency of prompting required for the student to successfully complete the task? 86

87 The Dos and Don’ts of Documentation Documentation Dos Provide all necessary and required documentation Document accuracy and prompting separately Documentation is specific to the individual student Documentation should be clear and concise Documentation Don’ts Contradictory or superfluous annotations Documentation of encouragement, directions, or supports (physical assistance) that do not lead the student to the correct answer 87

88 The Dos and Don’ts of Documentation Physical Prompt Leads to the correct answer Ensures correct responding Most intrusive level of prompting Used if student does not respond to less intrusive forms of prompting (verbal, model, etc.) Hand-over-hand to indicate a response is physical prompting Physical Assist Does not lead to the correct answer Aides the child to “independently” indicate an answer or make a selection Used if student requires partial or full support of body Provided by holding the child’s arms or wrists and guiding some movements 88

89 Documentation Dos 89

90 Documentation Dos Task description is clearly stated Determined which item he should spend his money on first given 2 choices on an activity sheet Student work has been clearly evaluated Answered 2 out of 4 correctly for an accuracy of 50% Prompting has been clearly documented Type: Independent Frequency: None Setting: Special Ed classroom Interactions: Special Ed teacher and nurse 90

91 Documentation Don’ts ?????? ? 91

92 Documentation Don’ts Task description is specific, but it is unclear as to what skill the student is being evaluated on Spinning the Spinner? Gluing? Adding the money? Answering questions about spending within his budget? Evaluation of student work combines accuracy and prompting on multiple aspects of task Spinning: Independent = 5 pts. x 5 = 25 pts. Gluing: Full Physical = 1 pt. x 5 = 5 pts. Adding Total: Verbal = 4 pts. X 1 = 4 pts. Answ Questions: Independent = 5 pts. X 2 = 10 pts. 44/65 pts. = 68% 92

93 Documentation Don’ts Documentation of Prompting is confusing Type: Full, Verbal, Independent Frequency: Limited “Answered the questions independent of any clues.” Setting: Special Ed classroom Interactions: Special Ed teacher and classmates What is the nature of the interaction with classmates as it occurred during the assessment task? 93

94 The Dos and Don’ts of Documentation Had the focus of the task been on the student’s ability to answer questions about making spending decisions within a personal budget, he would have demonstrated a higher level of accuracy and greater independence thus contributing to a higher score in Achievement/ Progress. Accuracy: 2/2 for a score of 100% Complexity: Answered 2 Yes/No questions after completing a multi-part task. Independence: Answered questions independently 94

95 Documentation Dos Observation and interview forms can be submitted as a secondary-type of evidence to document either a pre-planned or naturally occurring event that demonstrates a student’s ability on a task that is aligned to a standard and element. In the absence of direct student work, however, it is very important that the information requested on the forms be filled out completely, specifically, and concisely in order for the student to get the appropriate score. 95

96 Documentation Dos 96 T he task description is concise and specific. The student is to respond to verbally presented questions by choosing the correct symbol from a choice of (2) two. ELA4LSV1 c. Responds to questions with appropriate information The documentation specifically addresses the information requested– What were the questions asked of the student: “What month is it? (asked 5 times) What were the student’s responses: Chose the snowflake (January) each time Were the student’s responses correct: Correct answers for an accuracy of 100% (5/5) The nature of the interaction is described– Interacted with nurse who asked the quest Prompting is clearly annotated (separate from accuracy)– Independently chose each answer

97 Documentation Don’ts Less can be more; do not include unnecessary information Review the documentation – without explanation, will someone else be able to understand what the student was asked to do and the connection to the standard and element? Documentation that is unclear, contradictory, or superfluous can result in lower scores for the student–or in the entry being nonscorable. 97

98 Documentation Don’ts 98 ELA8R1 b: Applies, analyzes and evaluates common organizational structures (e.g., graphic organizers, logical order, cause and effect relationships, comparison and contrast). T he task description is generic to cover a number of separate tasks. It is unclear what the task is or how it aligns to the standard and element. The documentation does NOT address the information requested– What were the questions asked of the student: ? What were the student’s responses: ? Were the student’s responses correct: 22/25 88% There is no documentation to address how the student interacted with all of these people during the assessment task.

99 The Dos and Don’ts of Documentation Had the Observation Form documented a specific aligned task for which the requested information was provided, this evidence could have contributed to a higher overall score in Achievement/Progress. Accuracy: + 22/25 for a score of 88% Was this 25 questions total, 25 questions for each of the many tasks the student completed, or 25 questions for one particular task not specifically described? Complexity: ? Without knowing what the questions are, how difficult the questions are, how many answer choices are provided, or how similar the distractors are, it is impossible to gauge the true complexity of the task. Independence: Limited verbal prompting Was the same prompting required each time? 99

100 Demonstrating Achievement/Progress Accuracy Complexity Independence

101 Demonstrating Achievement/Progress Achievement/Progress assesses the increase in the student’s proficiency of skill in the aligned standards- based tasks across the two collection periods. Increase in the Accuracy of student responses Increase in the Complexity of the tasks Increase in Independence as demonstrated through a decrease in the type and frequency of prompting 101

102 Demonstrating Achievement/Progress Achievement/Progress is scored by evaluating the net change in accuracy, complexity, and independence from Collection Period 1 to Collection Period 2. Both tasks in each collection period are considered together when evaluating the student’s ability. The greater the positive increase in these dimensions, the higher the Achievement/Progress score. 102

103 Achievement/Progress: Accuracy Accuracy of student work is considered across both pieces of evidence submitted for each collection period. 1. More correct responses in Collection Period 2 than in Collection Period 1; higher percentage of correct responses 2. Accuracy that stays the same across both collection periods 3. Decrease in accuracy from CP1 to CP2 4. Accuracy that is low in CP1 because the student is doing a very complex task and high in CP2 because the student is doing an easier task may not result in a higher score in A/P 103

104 Achievement/Progress: Accuracy 104 Example 1Example 2Example 3Example 4 CP1 Primary 50% 58% 100% 96% 97% 0% 10% CP1 Secondar y 65% 100% 98%20% CP2 Primary 88% 92% 100% 65% 70% 90% 95% CP1 Secondar y 96% 100% 75%100% ?

105 Achievement/Progress: Complexity Many ways to demonstrate and increase in complexity More questions or answer choices 5 questions to 10 questions 2 choices to 4 choices Different types of answer choices provided Matching vs. Multiple Choice vs. Short Answer Pictures vs. words Greater similarity between distractors Boy vs. Tree to Boy vs. Man Correct plus unlikely to all similar/possible 105

106 Achievement/Progress: Complexity Move from concrete to abstract concepts Manipulatives to pictures to words/numbers Concrete to representational to abstract Deeper level of knowledge within the same skill; moving from prerequisite skill to application closer to standard/element Describe to explain to interpret Label to compare to analyze 106

107 Achievement/Progress: Independence Increase in Independence–decrease in type and frequency of prompting Decrease in EITHER prompting type OR frequency Decrease in BOTH prompting type AND frequency From prompted in Collection Period 1 to independent participation in Collection Period 2 107

108 Achievement/Progress: Independence Types Physical Model Gestural Verbal Frequency Continuous Frequent Limited Independent 108

109 Achievement/Progress: Independence 109 Example 1Example 2Example 3 CP1 Primary -Frequent Verbal -Limited Gestural - Continuous Verbal --Limited Gestural -Partial Physical -Limited Verbal -Limited Gestural -Limited Verbal -Limited Gestural Independen t - Continuous Verbal -Frequent Verbal CP1 Secondar y -Partial Physical -Continuous Verbal Independen t -Frequent Verbal CP2 Primary -Limited Verbal -Limited Gestural -Limited Verbal -Limited Gestural -Limited Verbal -Limited Gestural - Limited Verbal Independen t CP1 Secondar y --Limited Verbal -Limited Verbal -Limited Gestural Independen t Independence

110 Demonstrating Achievement/Progress If there is no change in either accuracy, complexity, or independence, A/P score is “1” If the tasks from one collection period to the other are too different, A/P score is “1” No consistent skill to evaluate across the two collection periods 110

111 Demonstrating Achievement/Progress All students progress at different rates. It is important that the tasks on which the student is assessed demonstrate an appropriate level of challenge for the student and represent the student’s true knowledge and skill on the standard/element. The evidence submitted should be an authentic representation of the student’s ability. A student may show more progress in one content area than another or in one strand than another. A student who demonstrates “some” progress (A/P “2”) is showing progress- a “2” is good! 111

112 THANK YOU for your participation. This presentation will be available on the special education website for future viewing/reference Don’t hesitate to ask questions! We are here to support you throughout this process

113 Direct GAA questions to Terri Baggarly teresa.baggarly@cowetaschools.net (770) 254-2810 ext. 2011 Dr. Peggy Guebert peggy.guebert@cowetaschools.net (770) 254-2810 ext. 2006 Your consultant Your test coordinator


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