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Effective Safe and Supportive School Climate and Culture

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1 Effective Safe and Supportive School Climate and Culture
Presented by: Michele Carmichael ISBE Principal Consultant Behavioral Health Supports in Schools

2 Definitions Safe Supportive Climate Culture
Safe: in a position or situation that offers protection, so that harm, damage, loss or unwanted tampering is unlikely Supportive: providing additional help, encouragement, information Climate: school climate refers to the quality and character of school life. It is based on patterns of school life experiences and reflects norms, goals, values, interpersonal relationships, teaching, learning and leadership practices and organizational structures(National School Climate Council). It plays a role in: the adoption of new practices; large transformational changes; social and emotional learning; the prevalence of mental health issues the prevalence of school violence and bullying; academic success; teacher attrition; and much more. According to the National School Climate Center, most researchers agree that the essential school climate areas of focus include: Safety (e.g. rules and norms; physical safety; social-emotional safety); Relationships (e.g. respect for diversity; school connectedness/engagement; social support– adults; social support – students; leadership); Teaching and Learning (e.g. social, emotional, ethical and civic learning; support for learning; professional relationships); and the Institutional Environment (e.g. physical surrounding). Culture: the integrated pattern of thoughts, communications, actions, customs, beliefs, values and institutions associated wholly or partially with racial, ethnic, linguistic groups as well as with spiritual, biological, geographical or sociological characteristics. Culture is dynamic in nature and individuals may identify with multiple cultures over the course of their lifetimes (Gilbert, Goode, & Dunne, 2007; HHS OMH, 2005)

3 US DOE Guiding Principles*
Guiding Principle 1: Climate and Prevention Guiding Principle 2: Clear, Appropriate, and Consistent Expectations and Consequences Guiding Principle 3: Equity and Continuous Improvement . *http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/letters/colleague title-vi.html

4 US DOE-DOJ Joint “Dear Colleague” Letter
“The Departments strongly support schools in their efforts to create and maintain safe and orderly educational environments that allow our nation’s students to learn and thrive. Many schools have adopted comprehensive, appropriate, and effective programs demonstrated to: (1) reduce disruption and misconduct; (2) support and reinforce positive behavior and character development; and (3) help students succeed. Successful programs (may incorporate a wide range of strategies to reduce misbehavior and maintain a safe learning environment, including conflict resolution, restorative practices, counseling, and structured systems of positive interventions. The Departments recognize that schools may use disciplinary measures as part of a program to promote safe and orderly educational environments”

5 US DOE-DOJ Joint “Dear Colleague” Letter
“Regardless of the program adopted, Federal law prohibits public school districts from discriminating in the administration of student discipline based on certain personal characteristics.” “Federal law also prohibits discriminatory discipline based on other factors, including disability, religion, and sex.”

6

7 Framework for Safe & Successful Schools*
Efforts to improve school climate, safety, and learning are not separate endeavors. They must be designed, funded, and implemented as a comprehensive school-wide approach that facilitates interdisciplinary collaboration and builds on a multitiered system of supports *Cowan, K. C., Vaillancourt, K., Rossen, E., & Pollitt, K. (2013). A framework for safe and successful schools [Brief]. Bethesda, MD: National Association of School Psychologists.

8 Illinois’ Essential Elements of School Improvement
Leadership Professional Development Curriculum Instruction Assessment Conditions for Learning Community & Family Data Driven Decision Making

9 Curriculum & Instruction Governance/ Management
IL-SIP Systems Curriculum & Instruction Curriculum Instruction Governance/ Management Leadership Comprehensive Planning-Data Driven Decision-Making Professional Development Assessment Learning Supports-MTSS Conditions for Learning Community and Family Engagement Content contained is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

10 Trauma Informed Practices
What? Substance Use and Abuse Family & Community Engagement 21st Century SEL PBIS Trauma Informed Practices Restorative Practices Wraparound Transition Planning Health Centers SASS LRE Military Families Poverty Bullying Prevention Autism Mental Health Special Education

11 Improving Student Outcomes
PBIS Learning Supports Improving Student Outcomes Wraparound 21st Century Trauma Informed Practices Military Families Transition Planning Health Centers SEL Mental Health Autism Family & Community Engagement Bullying Prevention Special Education LRE Poverty SASS Restorative Practices

12 How? MTSS: Framework for organizing a continuum of interventions
Ensure ALL students get appropriate instruction & supports within a safe & supportive environment Maximize student achievement AND Increase social, emotional, behavioral student competencies Process vs organizational framework

13 MTSS “MTSS encompasses: Wellness promotion;
Universal screening for academic, behavioral, and emotional barriers to learning; Implementation of evidence-based interventions that increase with intensity as needed; and Values cultural and ethnic diversity.

14 Intensive Individualized
MTSS cont. Intervention Early Intervention Intensity & Duration of intervention based on student need(s) Wellness Promotion/Prevention

15 MTSS cont. Monitoring of on-going student progress in response to implemented interventions, and Engagement in systematic data-based decision-making about services needed for students based on specific outcomes.

16 MTSS cont. Holistic approach to integrate academic, social, emotional, behavioral and physical efforts (Whole Child) State, Community, LEA, School, Classroom

17 MTSS Evidence supporting social, emotional and behavioral supports within a MTSS framework: Grounded in the Public Health Model Grounded in Organizational Theory Ground in Ecological Approach Theoretical foundations in: Behaviorism ABA PBS Randomized control trials in behavioral supports Meta-Analyses on social, emotional supports

18 Essential Element: Leadership MTSS requires effective leadership,
leadership that is dedicated to principles that ensure high levels of success for all students. This leadership is symbolized by a collaborative style that is focused on the mission that all students will achieve and the creation of a system to be certain that good intentions are translated into success.

19 Essential Element: Professional Development
Professional development for teachers is determined by data (including classroom observations and review of lesson plans) that demonstrate teachers' attention to academic, social, emotional, and behavioral expectations and standards.

20 Essential Element: Conditions for Learning http://isbe
Integrate supports through collaboration MTSS for academic, physical, social, emotional, and behavioral programming Resources identified and allocated/reallocated for MTSS’s implementation. Implementation is monitored and evaluated for continuous improvement

21 Essential Element: Conditions for Learning cont.
School personnel actively model and foster a positive school environment where students feel valued and are challenged to be engaged and grow cognitively. School Leadership actively models and fosters a positive school environment where staff members feel valued and are challenged to be engaged and grow professionally.

22 Conditions for Learning cont.
Essential Element: Conditions for Learning cont. The environment of the school (physical, social, emotional, and behavioral) is safe, welcoming, and conducive to learning. The school culture supports teachers in practicing effective and responsive instruction to meet individual student needs. All teachers invite valid and reliable Learning Supports identified by their school leadership into their classrooms including but not limited to programs/strategies, co-teaching opportunities, and consultation.

23 Conditions for Learning cont.
Essential Element: Conditions for Learning cont. The school culture promotes and supports the academic, physical, social, emotional, and behavioral skill development and engagement of students. The school culture promotes and supports the physical, social, emotional, and behavioral health of all school personnel. All school personnel work effectively and equitably with racially, culturally, linguistically, and economically diverse students.

24 Essential Element: Community and Family Engagement
School Leadership and primary caregivers engage in regular communication to provide mutual supports and guidance between home and school for all aspects of student learning. All teachers communicate regularly with primary caregivers and encourage them to participate as active partners in teaching and reinforcing physical, social, emotional, behavioral, and academic competencies.

25 Essential Element: Assessment
Data-driven process Screening Diagnostic Progress Monitoring/ Formative Assessment Evaluative Assessment Screening Diagnostic Progress Monitoring Evaluation

26 Screening Assessment Social, Emotional, Behavioral screening
Pediatrician Child Find 0-3 EC School-age Local Indicators Attendance, Nurse visits, ODRs, …

27 Diagnostic Assessment
Functional Behavior Assessment Simple/Practical Mild to moderate problem behaviors Not dangerous Occurring in few settings Complex Analysis Moderate to severe behavioral issues May be dangerous May occur in multiple settings

28 Progress Monitoring (Formative) Assessment
Social, emotional, behavioral progress monitoring Is the intervention working (Universal, Targeted & Individual) Continue? Revise? Change? Lack of student progress

29 Progress Monitoring (Formative) Assessment
Social, emotional, behavioral progress monitoring Lack of student progress Implemented with fidelity? Match the function of behavior? Correct function? Appropriate intervention? Need additional supplemental supports? Is the intervention being implemented with fidelity? Does the intervention match the function of behavior? Has the correct function been identified? Has the appropriate intervention been implemented? Does the student need additional supplemental supports?

30 Multi-Tiered System of Support

31 Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA)/ Behavior Support Planning(BSP)
Simple/Practical Mild to moderate problem behaviors Not dangerous Occurring in few settings Complex Analysis Moderate to severe behavioral issues May be dangerous May occur in multiple settings

32 FBA/BSP “A primary goal of FBA is to guide the development of effective positive interventions based on the function of the behavior.”* Interventions based on FBA result in significant change in student behavior. ** * Horner, 1994 ** Carr et al., 1999; Ingram, Lewis-Palmer, & Sugai, 2005 * Horner, 1994 ** Carr et al., 1999; Ingram, Lewis-Palmer, & Sugai, 2005

33 FBA/BSP At the Universal – Tier 1 Prevention Level
FBA can be used as a school-wide practice to predict environmental changes and develop interventions to prevent. At the Targeted – Tier 2 Early Intervention Level FBA can be used as a simple assessment/intervention process for students with mild to moderate issues. At the Intensive – Tier 3 Individualized Level FBA involves a more complex assessment/intervention process for students with more chronic, intensive behavior issues which potential cross multiple domains and where Universal and targeted interventions were unsuccessful at supporting the student. * Horner, 1994 ** Carr et al., 1999; Ingram, Lewis-Palmer, & Sugai, 2005 * Horner, 1994 ** Carr et al., 1999; Ingram, Lewis-Palmer, & Sugai, 2005

34 Basic FBA to BSP Portland State University University of Oregon
Trainer’s Manual Authors Sheldon Loman, Ph.D. Portland State University M. Kathleen Strickland-Cohen, Ph.D. University of Oregon Chris Borgmeier, Ph.D. Robert Horner, Ph.D.

35 Illinois Statewide Technical Assistance Collaborative
ISTAC Illinois Statewide Technical Assistance Collaborative Service entity Training and Technical Assistance

36 ISTAC SERVICES Basic FBA/BSP
Statewide team of Technical Assistance Specialists Provision of both training and targeted technical assistance Content aligned with Eight Essentials Technical assistance provided through a coach the coach model at district or coop level Common goals: build local capacity and establish sustainability

37 ISTAC TRAINING CURRICULUM
ISTAC SERVICES Basic FBA/BSP Evidence-based/Evidence-informed Practices for: Data-driven decision making Systemic support structures School climate and culture Inclusive educational environments Leadership skill development Student behavior Stakeholder engagement Transition planning and other special education mandates

38 ISTAC TRAINING CURRICULUM
Available to all public schools All trainings accessible through statewide training calendar https://www.illinoiscsi.org/Pages/Calendar. aspx & Duplicate trainings offered on regional basis to ensure statewide consistency and equitable access

39 Closure/Contacts Michele Carmichael
Behavioral Health Supports & Schools, ISTAC 217/


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