Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

The Importance of Physical Education In Our Schools Chad Fenwick and Adriana Valenzuela Physical Education Advisors for LAUSD A presentation for Elementary.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "The Importance of Physical Education In Our Schools Chad Fenwick and Adriana Valenzuela Physical Education Advisors for LAUSD A presentation for Elementary."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 The Importance of Physical Education In Our Schools Chad Fenwick and Adriana Valenzuela Physical Education Advisors for LAUSD A presentation for Elementary School Teachers

3 Experts Agree Exercise Prevents Obesity Type II Diabetes Heart Disease Osteoporosis Cancer Depression Absenteeism Increases Learning BDNF Attention Memory Math Reading Behavior

4 How exercise affects the brain Mood regulation Self-esteem Impulse control Combats toxic effects of stress hormones Improves neural arousal Combats depression Improves behavior Memory retention – Better encodes information

5 How exercise affects the brain Exercise makes it easier for our nerves to wire together. Neurogenesis in hippocampus which is important for learning and memory BDNF - Increases neuronal communication AEROBIC ACTIVITY GROWS NEW BRAIN CELLS!!

6

7 1999 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990, 1999, 2009 (*BMI 30, or about 30 lbs. overweight for 5’4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

8 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1985 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

9 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1986 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

10 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1987 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

11 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1988 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

12 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1989 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

13 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

14 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1991 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

15 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1992 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

16 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1993 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

17 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1994 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

18 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1995 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

19 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1996 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

20 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1997 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%

21 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1998 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%

22 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1999 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%

23 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2000 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%

24 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2001 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

25 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2002 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

26 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2003 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

27 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2004 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

28 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2005 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

29 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2006 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

30 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2007 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

31 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2008 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

32 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2009 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

33 “1 in 2 Latino children will develop Type II diabetes during their lifetimes if the obesity epidemic is not corrected.” Narayan, et. al., 2003Narayan, et. al., 2003

34

35

36 Evolved out of NEED. Conserve They drive us to load up on and Because tomorrow we will have to

37 Physical Education/Physical Activity Physical education teachers the students the skills and knowledge to be physically active the rest of their lives. The more physical skills the students learn the lower their BMI The more physical skills the students learn the physically active they are and the lower their BMI Physical education classes are one of the only places students have to learn these skills anymore.

38 Studies of Studies

39

40

41  37.2% of children in the US overweight or at risk.  Overweight girls have more behavior problems than all boys and non-overweight girls  Weight is negatively related to academic performance (Overweight children have lower math skills, overweight boys also have lower reading skills)  Higher BMI in boys is associated with significantly lower verbal skills (P < 0.10), social skills (P < 0.05), and motor skills (P < 0.05)  Association of overweight with academic performance and social and behavioral problems: an update from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study. Judge S, Jahns L. J Sch Health. 2007; 77:

42 BDNF BDNF is a THE MOTHER OF ALL BRAIN GROWTH FACTORS which regulate the survival, growth & differentiation of neurons during development and is vital to continue our Brain’s job of Adapting to the world- LEARNING. BDNF functions to translate activity into synaptic & nerve plasticity in the adult animal. BDNF is MIRACLE GRO for the brain and is Evolution’s great gift to us that is made when we use our brain cells. BDNF is an anti-depressant, anti-toxic stress factor and correlates with intelligence and memory.

43 Language Arts – GORT-4 Grade Level %+230% These increases are in a four month period.

44 3 Years of Literacy Data Naperville Central H.S. 1st Period 8th Period

45 2 years of Math Data Naperville Central H.S 2 years of Math Data Naperville Central H.S

46 Delaine Eastin “This statewide study provides compelling evidence that the physical well-being of students has a direct impact on their ability to achieve academically.”

47 Statewide Study Individually matched scores from the spring 2001 Stanford Achievement Test, Ninth Edition (SAT-9) with the state-mandated physical fitness test, (FITNESSGRAM) given in 2001 to students in 5th, 7th, and 9th grade.

48 School PE was increased from once a week to 5 times a week. 250 students participated, and the intervention scheduled for three months. Prior physical activity had consisted of ball play only. Physical education department added running, hip hop dance, aerobics, spinning, indoor rowing, and military boot camp training. After school activities were offered every day. Food served at school was changed to offer only healthy “ super foods. ” All junk food was removed. ABSENTEEISM decreased by 38%. CONCENTR ATION ABILITY was measured and it improved 33%. Teachers reported, “ The increase in exercise had great effects on CLASSROOM BEHAVIOR. ” Exercise had a major impact on GRADES; there was an average of 1.5 grade improvement across the board. The Institute for Human Physiology, Copenhagen University, Chris MacDonald, and Danmarks Radio (TV DR 1) partnered in this project. Johannes Skolen Copenhagen, Denmark

49 Exercise and Depression

50 20 versus 40 minutes of intense play Engaging in regular, vigorous aerobic exercise with peers in an organized setting decreased depressive symptoms in dose–response fashion among overweight children. This randomized trial in a community sample is the first experimental demonstration of a dose– response benefit of physical training on depressive symptoms in children (that is, where increasing amounts of training result in increased benefits, demonstrating a cause–effect relationship). Petty et al : Exercise Effects on Depressive Symptoms and Self-Worth in Overweight Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Pediatric Psychology Advance Access published February 16, 2009 N=207, 7–11 years, were randomly assigned to low or high dose (20 or 40 min/day) aerobic exercise programs (13 weeks),or control group.

51 Lincoln Middle School Incidents/Suspensions

52

53 Phenomenon  Woodland Elementary School 2005 Fall PE one day per week / 50 minutes Jan - June PE4life Program Five days a week / 45 minutes. -Inner city school with 80% of kids on free lunch program  PE4LIFE added Cardiac monitored watches, Dance Dance Revolution, A few exercise bicycles/fitness machines. AND A NEW ATTITUDE

54

55 Physical Activity and API Scores (Concurrent Relationship) API Score Percent who engaged in any physical activity 1st (Lowest) 2nd 3rd 4th 5th (Highest) API Quintile

56 Physical Activity and Annual Changes in Test Scores ReadingLanguageMathematics Percent who engaged in any physical activity Change in SAT-9 (NPR) Source: California Healthy Kids Survey & STAR data files.

57 The World of Brain Research A Sampling of Studies Linking Movement and Academic Success “Obesity is linked to poor academic performance, including increased absenteeism, lower GPA, and fewer years of schooling. All students benefit from increased physical activity, but low- performing schools have more to gain due to student exposure to more academic risk factors, including: violence, low expectations, and lack of exposure to caring relationships.” Taras & Potts-Datema, 2005Taras & Potts-Datema, 2005

58 ALBANY PARK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 4-YEAR API GROWTH

59 -120 minutes -360 minutes -720 minutes

60 The World of Brain Research A Sampling of Studies Linking Movement and Academic Success “There is NO evidence in the research literature that increased physical education negatively impacts student performance in the core academic subject areas.” Physical Education Research for Kids, Literature Review, 2009

61 8 µV 3 µV Compatible Incompatible Higher FitLower Fit Pontifex et al. (2011). JOCN, 23,

62 The World of Brain Research A Sampling of Studies Linking Movement and Academic Success “Physical activity increases concentration, mental cognition, and facilitates executive function.” Hanson & Austen, 2003Hanson & Austen, 2003 Maher, 2006Maher, 2006 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2007Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2007 Caterino & Polak, 1999Caterino & Polak, 1999 Etnier, et. al., 1997Etnier, et. al., 1997 Trudeau & Shepard, 2008Trudeau & Shepard, 2008 Tomporowski, et. al., 2008Tomporowski, et. al., 2008 Hanson & Austen, 2003Hanson & Austen, 2003 Maher, 2006Maher, 2006 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2007Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2007 Caterino & Polak, 1999Caterino & Polak, 1999 Etnier, et. al., 1997Etnier, et. al., 1997 Trudeau & Shepard, 2008Trudeau & Shepard, 2008 Tomporowski, et. al., 2008Tomporowski, et. al., 2008

63 Clinical status at 10 months (6 months after treatment) among patients who were remitted (N = 83) after 4 months of treatment in Exercise (N = 25), Medication (N = 29), and Combination (N = 29) groups. Compared with participants in the other conditions, those in the Exercise condition were more likely to be partially or fully recovered and were less likely to have relapsed. Exercise - An Antidepressant? Exercise or Zoloft

64 Conditions That Are Caused or Worsened by A Sedentary Life Angina, heart attack, coronary artery disease Breast cancer Colon cancer Congestive heart failure Depression Gallstone disease High blood triglyceride High blood cholesterol Hypertension Less cognitive function Low blood HDL Lower quality of life Obesity (more difficult time with weight control) Osteoporosis Pancreatic cancer Peripheral vascular disease Physical frailty Premature mortality Prostate cancer Sleep apnea Stiff joints Stroke Type 2 diabetes S Sedentary Life Style Increases The Progression Of : ADHD, Anxiety, Addiction Alzheimer’s Chronic Back Pain Cognitive Decline Debilitating Illness Disease Cachexia Falls Resulting in Broken Hips Physical Frailty Spinal Cord Injury Stress Vertebral Femoral Fractures

65

66

67

68

69 The World of Brain Research A Sampling of Studies Linking Movement and Academic Success “Physical activity, when integrated into the curriculum, takes up little time, and improves on-task behavior.” North Carolina Department of EducationNorth Carolina Department of Education ★ ncpe4me.com - Energizers - 85% of districts use them ★ 28,000 teachers trained North Carolina Department of EducationNorth Carolina Department of Education ★ ncpe4me.com - Energizers - 85% of districts use them ★ 28,000 teachers trained

70 The World of Brain Research A Sampling of Studies Linking Movement and Academic Success Students who participated in school physical education programs did not experience a harmful effect on their standardized test scores, though less time was available for other academic subjects - Sallis, McKenzie, Kolody, Lewis, Marshall, and Rosengard, Shephard, Dwyer, Coonan, Leitch, Hetzel, and Baghurst, 1983

71 Exercise and Learning Juvenal ( A. D.) “We should pray that there be a sound mind in a sound body”. Thomas Jefferson “You must have a healthy body to learn to read, and you must be able to read to be healthy”.

72 Costs of Obesity 6 years ago California estimated the costs of obesity to be 20 Billion dollars 2009 they estimated 40 Billion dollars

73 QUESTIONS & ANSWERS THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME!


Download ppt "The Importance of Physical Education In Our Schools Chad Fenwick and Adriana Valenzuela Physical Education Advisors for LAUSD A presentation for Elementary."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google