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ASEE International Forum, Indianapoolis, Indiana, USA, 1 June 2014

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Presentation on theme: "ASEE International Forum, Indianapoolis, Indiana, USA, 1 June 2014"— Presentation transcript:

1 ASEE International Forum, Indianapoolis, Indiana, USA, 1 June 2014
Vision 20/25 Engineering for the Americas 1 ASEE International Forum, Indianapoolis, Indiana, USA, 1 June 2014

2 Panelists Maria Mercedes Larrondo Petrie, PhD
LACCEI Executive Director OAS Engineering for the Americas CoChair Jaime Bonilla Ríos, PhD LACCEI President Elect GEDC LatAm Chapter President Jose Carlos Quadrado, PhD IFEES President Past President of ASIBEI Renetta Garrison Tull, PhD LACCEI Women in STEM Leader Co-PI, ADVANCE Hispanic Women in STEM

3 Engineering in the Americas
Maria Mercedes Larrondo Petrie, PhD LACCEI Executive Director OAS Engineering for the Americas CoChair

4 Engineering in the Americas
Key elements of international collaborations Linkages among organizations Evolution of collaboration among the organizations OAS Vision 20/25 Highlight some Initiatives Accreditation Capacity Building Faculty Pedagogy Capacity Building Dean and Director Management and Leadership Capacity Building Women and Diversity in STEM

5 LACCEI = International Collaboration

6 International Collaboration
Need Infrastructure Linkages Critical Mass of Stakeholders Agreement Scale-up, Drill-down

7 Stakeholders, Organization and Linkages
Industry Companies and Professionals and their Organizations WFEO World Federation of Engineering Organizations UPADI Panamerican Federation of Engineering Organizations ASCE ASME IEEE Regions

8 Stakeholders, Organization and Linkages
Government Agencies and Organizations UN UNESCO United Nations OAS Organization of American States Ministries National Academies National Science Foundation Equivalents Accreditation Agencies

9 Stakeholders, Organization and Linkages
Universities Engineering Education Organizations IFEES International Federation of Engineering Education Societies ASIBEI LACCEI ABENGE ASECEI ASEE ANFEI CEEA CONDEFI CONFEDI Stakeholders Faculty Dean and Directors Students

10 Stakeholders, Organization and Linkages
Universities Engineering Deans or Directors Councils GEDC Global Engineering Deans Council GEDC Latin America LACCEI EDDC ASEE EDC Canadian EDC Nucleo de Decanos Stakeholders Faculty Dean and Directors Students

11 Stakeholders, Organization and Linkages
Universities Students and their Organizations SPEED Student Platform for Engineering Education Development Tau Beta Pi Honor Society Student Chapters of Professional Organizations Stakeholders Faculty Dean and Directors Students

12 OAS Engineering for the Americas
The Ministers of the 34 countries of the OAS created “Engineering for the Americas” (EftA) Three Focus Areas: Engineering Education Accreditation Job Creation Brought together the organizations from different sectors and industry

13 Linking across the Americas
In 2006, in the first symposium of Engineering for the Americas, an agreement to collaborate was signed by government, and academic organizations, at global, regional and national levels

14 Major outcome of EftA Outcome of their EftA collaborative effort: Proposal for creation of Greater Caribbean Region Engineering Accreditation System (GCREAS) was funded by the InterAmerican Development Bank Multi-national agency Multi-lingual agency Committed to become a signatory of the Washington Accord Currently accrediting

15 OAS Ministers’ Vision 20/25
Vision 20/25 in Science, Technology and Innovation for the America: Hemispheric Cooperation for Competitiveness and Prosperity in a Knowledge Economy Working Groups formed: Innovation Human Resource Training and Education National Quality Infrastructure Technology Development

16 WG1: Innovation Goal for 2025: To develop a culture of technology-based innovation in the Americas that fosters inclusiveness, entrepreneurship and creative thinking in academia, the private and public sectors and society in general

17 WG2: Human Resources Training and Education
Goal for 2025: To increase by at least 50% the number of female and male graduates in Science, Technology and Engineering (STE) and technical education, and to substantially improve study programs in these areas to respond to the changing needs of industry, especially Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSME), and specific communities.

18 WG2: Human Resources Training and Education
Targets: 1. Increase inter-American cooperation in STE education by: promoting academy public–private partnerships; sharing best practices; exchanging faculty and students and developing programs of excellence such as dual degrees among universities; and, strengthening the OAS hemispheric initiative Engineering for the Americas (EftA)

19 WG2: Human Resources Training and Education
Targets: 2. Promote technical education to create a critical mass of qualified technicians for strategic industries by fostering the creation of technical specializations; upgrading study programs with the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs); and, promoting local and regional partnerships with universities and the public and private sectors.

20 WG2: Human Resources Training and Education
Targets: 3. Upgrade STE study programs and seek their international recognition by incorporating entrepreneurial, innovation and sustainability components; creating academia-public–private partnerships (cooperatives and internship programs); and promoting, at local and international levels, the exchange of best practices, applied research and the use of ICTs and advanced networks.

21 WG2: Human Resources Training and Education
Targets: 4. Provide opportunities for faculty to continue professional development such as and post-doctoral degrees, and sabbaticals. 5. Attract the best students towards STE careers, especially women and minority groups, by increasing awareness on the importance of STE, establishing scholarship funds, and, making loans and other financial assistance options available to them. 6. Create and/or strengthen extension services for the community and industry (MSMEs), including technology parks, incubators, and, advisory, consulting and access to national quality infrastructure services.

22 WG2: Human Resources Training and Education
Targets: 6. Create and/or strengthen extension services for the community and industry (MSMEs), including technology parks, incubators, and, advisory, consulting and access to national quality infrastructure services.

23 WG2: Human Resources Training and Education
Targets: 6. Create and/or strengthen extension services for the community and industry (MSMEs), including technology parks, incubators, and, advisory, consulting and access to national quality infrastructure services.

24 WG3: National Quality Infrastructure
Goal for 2025: To ensure that all OAS member states have access to internationally recognized quality infrastructure services to foster competitiveness, innovation, trade and consumer safety

25 WG4: Technology Development
Goal for 2025: To strengthen Inter-American cooperation in science, technology and innovation in selected priority areas to achieve more effective and faster technological development in the region.

26 Major Outcomes in WG2 Goal for 2025:
600 graduate scholarships given by Mexico for non-Mexican faculty and students to study MS or PhD in STE in the Monterrey Tec campuses in Mexico Mobility program will be announced July 21, 2014 Surveys completed in student perception of STE and industry needs Delphi surveys being completed by traditional engineering program disciplines (Industrial, Chemical, Civil, Mechanical and Electrical.

27 National and Region Indicators have been proposed
Human Resource Training and Education Indicators: University students by scientific fields Univ graduates, master’s graduates and doctorates by scientific field Researchers per thousand labor force S&T personnel (technicians, R&D scholars/doctorates, researchers, S&T services personnel, technicians and equivalent staff) Researchers by sector of employment (higher education, enterprises, government, non profit/private organizations) Researchers by scientific field (agricultural science, engineering and technology, medical sciences, natural and exact sciences) Researchers by graduation level (doctorates, basic university degree, master and other post-secondary diploma)

28 ACCREDITATION In the AMERICAS

29 Mutual recognition of accreditation accords
International Engineering Alliance Washington Accord – 1989 for engineering (~4 years duration) Sydney Accord – 2001 for engineering technology (~3 yr,) Dublin Accord – 2001 for technician engineering (~2 yrs) In the Americas, only the US and Canada have signed.

30 To obtain international recognition, programs are accredited by other signatory agencies

31 What is being done to increase the numbers of accredited Engineering programs in Latin America and the Caribbean?

32 #1: New Accrediting Agencies have been created with the commitment of signing the Washington Accord
Inter American Development Bank funded creation of: ACAAI: Central American Accrediting Agency for Architecture and Engineering Programs based on Engineers Canada GCREAS: Greater Caribbean Region Engineering Accreditation Systems Based on ABET IEEE and University of the West Indies created CACET: Caribbean Accreditation Council for Engineering and Technology based on Engineering Council of the UK

33 #2: A regional accord has been signed to move toward mutual recognition and mobility within the LAC region In 2010, the ALAI Latin American Engineering Accreditation Accord was signed by national and regional accrediting agencies and engineering education associations: Argentina (CONFEDI) Bolivia (CEUB) Brasil (ABENGE and CONFEA) Central America (ACAAI) Chile (Acredita and CONFEDI) Colombia (ACOFI) Mexico (CACEI) Paraguay (CPI)

34 #3: Professional societies are assisting accreditation agencies to align their process to comply with Washington Accord IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers) is working with the Peruvian accrediting agency (ICACIT, founded in 2001) translated the ABET materials into Spanish trained evaluators Assisted in ICACIT-ABET simultaneous accreditation visits since 2007, and ICACIT accreditation visits starting in 2009

35 #4: Bridging the knowledge and experience gap through capacity building
The Ministers of Science and Technology of the 34 countries in the Organization of American States (OAS) launched Engineering for the Americas initiative and cited engineering program accreditation as one of the 3 priority focus areas. LACCEI has been working with the OAS since 2006 on strategies to advance accreditation

36 #4: Bridging the knowledge and experience gap through capacity building
LACCEI developed a model to provide a systematic approach for universities to attain an accreditable or substantially equivalent engineering program LACCEI developed the Par Amigo “Friendly Peer” or “Peer Mentor” Accreditation Training Program Generic + agency-specific workshops to build capacity and expertise in the accreditation process Database of Par Amigos experts Workshop materials in English and Spanish LACCEI sponsors the OAS Forum for Accrediting Agencies at their annual conference

37 Par Amigo initiative objectives:
assisting engineering programs with the selection of accrediting method and agency assisting engineering programs through the accreditation process and the preparation of the self-study serving as a multilingual and multicultural resource of information, practical assistance and mentors for engineering programs considering or seeking accreditation developing faculty leaders in program accreditation and evaluation for accrediting agencies in the Americas certifying and maintaining a Par Amigo registry who are familiar with and current in accreditation processes and provide cost effective assistance to engineering programs seeking accreditation. (Require each Par Amigo donate one week a year of free training/consulting/advice.)

38 Engineering Education Capability Maturity Model
Extension of an integrated process improvement model, the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) Goal: To increase capability of an institution’s educational processes. Process capability - the inherent ability of a process to produce planned results.

39 Based on the Capability Maturity Model Level 5: Optimizing
Continuously improving process Change management Level 4: Managed Predictable process Quantitative management Level 3: Defined Standard, consistent process Develop your process Engineering management Level 2: Repeatable Disciplined process Follow management principles Project management Level 1: Initial

40 EE-CMM Level 1 - Initial Few processes are defined.
Processes are adhoc and mostly reactive. Productivity and quality vary. Success depends on individual effort. Current levels of quality and productivity of peer programs/institutions are not known. To advance to the next level – Level 2: identify and analyze peer programs, define its mission, goals, and objectives, impose more structure and control on educational process to enable more meaningful measurement.

41 EE-CMM Level 2 - Repeatable
Have policies for managing educational programs and procedures to implement these policies. Have established disciplined processes to identify inputs and outputs of the process, constraints and resources used to produce the final product. Basic project management practices are used to track cost, retention and productivity and compare them with peer institutions. Faculty document course syllabi, goals, objectives, learning outcomes, results and feedback, so successful course delivery can be repeated. A strong curriculum for each degree program includes engineering sciences, humanities, social sciences, communication skills & an appropriate professional component. To advance to Level 2 from Level 1: Use policies to guide degree programs in establishing management processes. Stabilized program planning and tracking produce repeatable earlier successes. Effectively control process using a program management system, following realistic plans based on performance in previous terms.

42 EE-CMM Level 3 - Defined To advance to Level 3 from Level 2:
Educational process for management & educational activities is documented, standardized, and integrated into a standard process for the institution. Mission, goals & objectives are published in the catalog and posted. All programs use approved, tailored version of institution’s standard process for developing and maintaining degree programs/courses. This level includes all in Level 2. To advance to Level 3 from Level 2: Publish learning outcomes in syllabi Document strategies to achieve outcomes Publish University & College mission statements Publish educational objectives for each program in the catalog Involve constituencies in reviewing and updating educational objectives Peer review proposed programs & courses Integrated program management Faculty development program

43 EE-CMM Level 4 – Managed Collect/use detailed measures of educational program/courses to quantitatively understand & control both the process & the programs. This level includes all in Level 3. To advance to Level 4 from Level 3: Document & implement feedback & assessment processes to determine if intended outcomes are being achieved Quality management Quantitative process management Comparison with peer institutions Document sufficient staff allocation and compensation Document good facilities and strong institutional support Involve constituencies in evaluating program outcomes

44 EE-CMM Level 5 - Optimizing
Continuous process improvement thru quantitative feedback from process and from testing innovative ideas & technologies. This level includes all in Level 4. To advance to Level 5 from Level 4: Manage changes in the educational process Manage changes in technology Manage student retention and rate of graduation Involvement by all faculty Feedback results in changes in educational program

45 Par Amigo Workshops will be presented at the next LACCEI conference
Accreditation Team Z.O. Gephardt, USA M.A. McPherson, PA A. Camacho, CO Lead the successful accreditation of UNINORTE’s 6 Engineering programs by ABET Par Amigo Workshops will be presented at the next LACCEI conference 22-24 July 2014 in Guayaquil, Ecuador (for more information:

46 CAPACITY BUILDING THROUGH INTERNATIONAL RECOGNIZED CERTIFICATIONS

47 Prof. Development of Engineering Faculty, Deans, and Students
For Faculty: COPEC and LACCEI, in partnership with IGIP are offering courses towards the ING PAED (Engineering Pedagogist) certification LACCEI offers Research and English improvement stays at its Florida Headquarters For Faculty and Program Directors: LACCEI is offering Par Amigo certification ABCs of Accreditation Translated workshops and materials on advanced topics given by ABET and CEAB

48 Prof. Development of Engineering Faculty, Deans, and Students
For Students: LACCEI in partnership with SPEED offer FLEI workshops on leadership, globalization and soft-skills LACCEI in partnership with SPEED sponsors national, hemispheric and global student research/project competitions.

49 Prof. Development of Engineering Faculty, Deans, and Students
For Deans: GEDC Latin America is providing professional development for deans For Deans and Program Directors: LACCEI in partnership with IGLU (in English: Institute for University Management and Leadership will be announcing IGLU-Ingenieria certification courses that are customized for Engineering Deans and Engineering Program Directors

50 GEDC LaTAM Jaime Bonilla Ríos, PhD LACCEI President Elect
GEDC LatAm Chapter President

51

52 GEDC LatAm Topics Next GEDC LatAm meeting September 28-30, 2014
The present and future of Engineering in LatAm Accreditation Issues Internationalization Role of the National and International Accreditations on Quality of Engineering Education Curriculum innovations in Engineering Schools Best Practice Industry-University Programs Research Activities in Development of an Engineer Leading Faculty through Institutional Changes MOOCS: Threat or Opportunity? Global Visión Innovation Experiential Learning Next GEDC LatAm meeting September 28-30, 2014 Viña del Mar, Chile Universidad Andrés Bello

53

54 IGLU - INGENIERIA Jose Carlos Quadrado, PhD IFEES President
Past President of ASIBEI Past President of SEFI

55 Women and diversity in STEM in the AMERICAS
Renetta Garrison Tull, PhD LACCEI Women in STEM Leader Co-PI, ADVANCE Hispanic Women in STEM

56 LACCEI Collaboration Community
> 10,000 in the database, designing specialized search engine for searching for academic or research collaborators

57 LACCEI 12 university founded LACCEI is 2003
Has grown to more than 180 universities interested in collaborating academically and in research with Latin American and Caribbean Engineering progs. Responsible OAS EftA Engineering Education inits

58 LACCEI Invitation multilingual,
LACCEI 2014 Conference July 2014 Guayaquil, Ecuador low cost, 1 free registration per Institution Member multilingual, EftA Encuentro opportunity to join initiatives Proceedings published with ISBN, indexed, archived, invited to LACCEI Journal Hemispheric Student Research Competition $75 conference registration for students competing Winner is sponsored to compete SPEED Global Student Competition in World Engineering Education Forum of IFEES ~500 participants

59 Gracias, Merci, Obrigado, Thank You
LACCEI Board of Directors 160+ Universities Skype: LACCEI

60 OAS-LACCEI Women in STEM initiative
2010 The Inter-American Year of Women (OAS) An opportunity to evaluate successes and challenges in the defense of women’s human rights and gender equity and equality, and create awareness regarding gender issues. “The low representation of women in science and engineering is a major hindrance to global capacity building in science and technology” Women for Science. An Advisory Report, InterAcademy Council, 2006

61 OAS-LACCEI Women in STEM initiative US data
In the US, women make up about half of the total workforce and receive half of the degrees in certain scientific fields, yet they represent only about 20% of the nation’s scientific and technical workers (US-NA, 2007). (Beyond Bias and Barriers, National Academies of Science, 2006) Percentage of STEM PhD degrees awarded to Women Source: National Science Foundation (2006). Survey of Earned Doctorates, , Arlington, VA.

62 OAS-LACCEI Women in STEM initiative US Data
Ten-year Comparison of Undergraduate Women Enrolled in Engineering Disciplines in the U.S

63 OAS-LACCEI Women in STEM initiative US data
% Women in Engineering Degree Programs in 1998 and 2008 (Summarized NSF data in Larrondo Petrie, Beltran Martinez, LACCEI 2010) Degree % Women 1998 %Women 2008 % Change BS 19.73% 17.53% -2.19% MS 20.11% 21.60% 1.49% PhD 17.50% 22.12% 4.62% Total 19.61% 18.63% -0.98%

64 OAS-LACCEI Women in STEM initiative BRAZIL data
CNPq Census of Research Groups Researchers by Sex (%) – CNPq Census of Research Groups % of Women Researchers and Women Group Leaders (2008) Scientific Areas % of Women % Women Group Leaders Engineering and Computer Sciences 27.31 21.90 Exact Sciences and Earth Sciences 33.73 28.21 Agrarian Sciences 37.86 32.29 Applied Social Sciences 47.69 44.20 Biological Sciences 53.29 51.26 Health Sciences 59.27 55.44 Human Sciences 60.40 56.37 Arts and Linguistics 66.46 66.49 TOTAL 48.89 44.52 Source: Strategies and Successes in Getting Women and Gender Considerations included in Brazil Scientific Institutions and Policies, Alice Abreu (2010) Source: Strategies and Successes in Getting Women and Gender Considerations included in Brazil Scientific Institutions and Policies, Alice Abreu (2010)

65 OAS-LACCEI Women in STEM initiative BRAZIL data
CNPq Census of Research Groups Percentage of Women Students in Research Groups by Level 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 PhD 49.1 51.8 52.8 54.4 55.1 MSc 52.2 55.7 56.7 57.7 Undergraduates 58.2 58.1 57.4 58.5 59.5 Total 54.1 56.0 57.3 Source: Strategies and Successes in Getting Women and Gender Considerations included in Brazil Scientific Institutions and Policies, Alice Abreu (2010)

66 OAS-LACCEI Women in STEM initiative Equity in LAC in STEM research?
Other countries in the Latin America and Caribbean % of women enrolled in technological careers: -Chile: 15% (2007) - Costa Rica: 20% (2004) According to a 2009 UN study, 46% of STEM researchers in LAC are female, Argentina, Cuba, Brazil, Paraguay and Venezuela have achieved gender parity. (Women and Girls in Science and Technology: increasing opportunities in Educatiomn, Research and Employment, Eva M. Rathberger, UN, 2009)


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