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PowerPoint Presentation by Monica Belcourt, York University and Charlie Cook, The University of West Alabama Managing Human Resources Belcourt * Bohlander.

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Presentation on theme: "PowerPoint Presentation by Monica Belcourt, York University and Charlie Cook, The University of West Alabama Managing Human Resources Belcourt * Bohlander."— Presentation transcript:

1 PowerPoint Presentation by Monica Belcourt, York University and Charlie Cook, The University of West Alabama Managing Human Resources Belcourt * Bohlander * Snell 5 th Canadian edition Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited. All rights reserved. The Dynamics of Labour Relations

2 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–2 Objectives After studying this chapter, you should be able to: 1.Identify and explain the federal and provincial legislation that provide the framework for labour relations. 2.Explain the reasons employees join unions. 3.Describe the process by which unions organize employees and gain recognition as their bargaining agent. 4.Discuss the bargaining process and the bargaining goals and strategies of a union and an employer.

3 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–3 Objectives (cont’d) After studying this chapter, you should be able to: 5.Differentiate the forms of bargaining power that a union and an employer may utilize to enforce their bargaining demands. 6.Describe a typical union grievance procedure and explain the basis for arbitration awards.

4 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–4 Government Regulation of Labour Relations The Industrial Relations Disputes and Investigation Act Canada Labour Code

5 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–5 Labour Relations Board Administrating the statutory procedures for the acquisition, transfer and termination of bargaining rights Hearing complaints related to unfair labour practices Supervising strikes and lock out votes Determining whether bargaining was done in good faith Remedying violations of collective bargaining legislation.

6 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–6 Labor Relations Process 1.Workers desire collective representation. 2.Union begins its organizing campaign. 3.Collective negotiations lead to a contract. 4.The contract is administered.

7 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–7 Why Employees Unionize As a result of economic needs (wages and benefits). Dissatisfaction with managerial practices. To fulfill social and status needs. Unionism is viewed as a way to achieve results they cannot achieve acting individually. To comply with union-shop provisions of the collective agreement in effect where they work.

8 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–8 The Labour Relations Process Figure 14.1

9 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–9 Organizing Campaigns Union/Employee Contact Initial Organizational Meeting Formation of In-House Committee Application to labour relations board and issuance of certificate Election of bargaining committee and contract negotiations Steps in the Organizing Process Process

10 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–10 United Food and Commercial Workers International Union Authorization Card

11 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–11 Employer Tactics Opposing Unionization Stressing favourable employer-employee relationship experienced without a union. Emphasize current advantages in wages, benefits, or working conditions the employees may enjoy. Emphasize unfavourable aspects of unionism: strikes, union dues. Initiate legal action when union members and leaders engage in unfair labour practices.

12 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–12 Employer “Don’ts” during Union Organizing Campaigns Attending union meetings, spying on employee-union gatherings, or questioning employees about the content of union meetings. Questioning present or current employees about their union sentiments, particularly about how they might vote in a union election. Threatening or terminating employees for their union support or beliefs. Changing the working conditions of employees because they actively work for the union or simply support its ideals. Supplying the names, addresses, and phone numbers of employees to union representatives or other employees sympathetic to the union. Promising employees improvements in working conditions (wage increases, benefit improvements, and so on) if they vote against the union. Accepting or reviewing union authorization cards or pro-union petitions, because employees’ names are listed on these documents. Figure 14.2 Employer “Don’ts” During Union Organizing Campaigns

13 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–13 Unfair Labour Practices for Unions Unions are prohibited from interfering with the formation of an employer’s organization. Unions cannot intimidate or coerce employees to become or remain members of a union. Unions cannot force employers to dismiss, discipline or discriminate against non-union employees. Unions must provide fair representation for all employees in the bargaining unit.

14 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–14 How Employees Become Unionized Voluntary recognition Regular certification Prehearing votes

15 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–15 Contract Negotiation Once the bargaining unit has been certified by the labour relations board, the employer and the union must bargain in good faith over the terms and conditions of a collective agreement.

16 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–16 Decertification If the majority of employees indicate that they do not want to be represented by the union or They want to be represented by another union or If the union failed to bargain

17 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–17 Impact of Unionization on Managers Challenges to Management Prerogatives  Management prerogatives versus union participation in decision-making in the work place. Loss of Supervisory Authority  Constraints on management in directing and disciplining the work force by terms of the collective bargaining agreement.

18 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–18 Structures, Functions, and Leadership of Labour Unions Craft unions  Unions that represent skilled craft workers Industrial unions  Unions that represent all workers—skilled, semiskilled, unskilled—employed along industry lines Employee associations  Labour organizations that represent various groups of professional and white-collar employees in labour- management relations.

19 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–19 Types of Unions The Canadian Labour Congress International and National unions Local unions

20 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–20 Typical Organization of a Local Union Local Union Meeting (Normally Monthly) President Business Representative Various Committee Chairpersons Vice-Presidents Secretary/Treasurer Sergeant at Arms Training and Education Grievance Committee: Chief Steward and Shop Stewards Collective Bargaining Social Local Union Members

21 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–21 Structure and Functions of Local Unions Local Officers  Elected officials who lead the union and serve on the bargaining committee for a new contract. Union Steward  An employee, as a nonpaid union official, represents the interests of members in their relations with management. Business Unionism  The term applied to the goals of labour organizations, which collectively bargain wages, hours, job security, and working conditions.

22 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–22 Labour Relations in the Public Sector Political nature of the labour management relationship  Alternate services are not available  Source of management authority  Strikes in public sector- essential services

23 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–23 Types of Arbitration Compulsory Binding Arbitration  A process for employees such as police officers, firefighters, and others in jobs where strikes cannot be tolerated to reach agreement. Final-offer Arbitration  The arbitrator must select one or the other of the final offers submitted by the disputing parties with the award is likely to go to the party whose final bargaining offer has moved the closest toward a reasonable settlement.

24 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–24 The Collective Bargaining Process Figure 14.4

25 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–25 The Bargaining Process Collective Bargaining Process  The process of negotiating a collective agreement, including the use of economic pressures by both parties. Bargaining Zone  Area within which the union and the employer are willing to concede when bargaining. Interest-based Bargaining  Problem-solving bargaining based on a win-win philosophy and the development of a positive long- term relationship.

26 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–26 The Bargaining Zone and Negotiation Influences Source: Adapted from Ross Stagner and Hjalmar Rosen, Psychology of Union-Management Relations (Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Company, 1965), 96. Adapted with permission from Brooks/Cole Publishing Co. Figure 14.5

27 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–27 Highlights in HRM Items in a Collective Agreement Typical clauses will cover Wages Grievance procedures Vacations Holidays Work schedules Management rights Union security Transfers Discipline Training No strike/no lockout clause Overtime Safety procedures Severance pay Seniority Pensions and benefits Outsourcing Progressive clauses will cover Employee access to records Limitations on use of performance evaluation Elder care leave, child care, work- family balance provisions Flexible medical spending accounts Protection against hazards of technology equipment Limitations against electronic monitoring Bilingual stipends Domestic partnership benefits Highlights 14.7

28 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–28 Management and Union Power in Collective Bargaining Bargaining Power  The power of labour and management to achieve their goals through economic, social, or political influence Union Bargaining Power  Strikes, pickets, and boycotts Management Bargaining Power  Hiring replacement workers, where allowed  Continuing operations staffed by management  Locking out employees

29 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–29 Picketing Striking Union Power in Collective Bargaining Boycotting Boycott Our Employer This Union On Strike Unfair On Strike Don’t Buy Here

30 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–30 Employer Power in Collective Bargaining Demanding concessions Locking out workers Management methods for applying economic pressure during bargaining: Outsourcing normal work Hiring replacement workers, where allowed

31 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–31 Union Security Agreements Dues Checkoff  Gives the employer the responsibility of withholding union dues from the paychecks of union members who agree to such a deduction. “Shop” Agreements  Require employees to join or support the union.  Union shop requires employee membership.  Agency shop allows voluntary membership; employee must pay union dues and fees.

32 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–32 Administration of the Collective Agreement Negotiated grievance procedures. The grievance procedure is a formal procedure that provides for the union to represent members and non-members in processing a grievance.

33 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–33 Grievance Arbitration Rights Arbitration  Arbitration over interpretation of the meaning of contract terms or employee work grievances. Submission to arbitrate  Statement that describes the issues to be resolved through arbitration.

34 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–34 The Arbitration Hearing The arbitrator declares the hearing open and obtains the submission to arbitrate. Parties present opening statements. Each side presents its case using witnesses and evidence; witnesses can be cross examined. Parties make closing statements. Arbitrator closes hearing and designates date and time for rendering the award.

35 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–35 The Arbitration Award Four factors arbitrators use to decide cases:  The wording of the collective agreement (or employment policy in nonunion organizations).  The submission to arbitrate (statement of problem to be solved) as presented to the arbitrator.  Testimony and evidence offered during the hearing.  Arbitration criteria or standards (similar to standards of common law) against which cases are judged.

36 Copyright © 2008 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Ltd.14–36 Key Terms arbitration award arbitrator authorization card bargaining power bargaining unit bargaining zone business agent collective bargaining process compulsory binding arbitration craft unions employee associations final offer arbitration grievance procedure industrial unions interest-based bargaining labour relations process management rights rights arbitration submission to arbitrate unfair labour practices (ULPs) union shop union steward


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