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Presentation on theme: "Presentation Plus! Glencoe World Geography Copyright © by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Developed by FSCreations, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 Send."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Presentation Plus! Glencoe World Geography Copyright © by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Developed by FSCreations, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio Send all inquiries to: GLENCOE DIVISION Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 8787 Orion Place Columbus, Ohio Welcome to Presentation Plus!

3 Splash Screen

4 Chapter Introduction Section 1Living in Latin America Section 2People and Their Environment Chapter Summary & Study Guide Chapter Assessment Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slides. Contents

5 Intro 1

6 Intro 2 Discuss aspects of the Latin American economy and how geography affects transportation and communications.  Explain how Latin America’s forest resources are affected by economic development and how the region’s countries are working with other countries to solve economic and migration problems. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Chapter Objectives

7 Intro 3 As you read this chapter, use your journal to note examples of how geography affects life in Latin America and how the people of this region interact with their environment.

8 End of Intro

9 Section 1-1 Living in Latin America Identify the basis of the economy of many Latin American countries.  List the advantages and disadvantages for Mexico of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).  Discuss the causes and consequences of Latin America’s economically dependent status.  Explain how the region’s physical geography has affected transportation and communications. Objectives Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

10 Section 1-2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. campesino  latifundia  minifundia  cash crop  developing country  Terms to Know service industry  maquiladora  North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) export  Living in Latin America

11 Section 1-3 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Tijuana Honduras  Places to Locate Living in Latin America

12 Section 1-4 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.

13 Section 1-5 The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which went into effect January 1, 1994, provides for the elimination of many trade restrictions among the three countries of North America by Goods such as cars and clothing, if produced in North America, will no longer be subject to import tariffs, nor will farm products crossing national borders. Mexico is emerging with a stronger economy as a result of its expanding trade.

14 Section 1-6 Agriculture These highly mechanized commercial operations produce high yields in return for low labor costs. Latifundia and Minifundia Large agricultural estates owned by wealthy families or corporations are called latifundia.  (pages 237–238) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

15 Section 1-7 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again. (pages 237–238) Agriculture (cont.)

16 Section 1-8 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Agriculture (cont.) Campesinos have begun combining their farms into large, jointly run cooperatives. Small government-owned farms on which rural farmers grow crops for their families are called minifundia.  (pages 237–238)

17 Section 1-9 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Argentina, Mexico, and Brazil raise cattle for export on large ranches in grasslands areas.  Countries are at economic risk, however, if weather or other disasters destroy their cash crops. Cash Crops and Livestock Latin American countries are the world’s largest producers of coffee, bananas, and sugarcane for export.  (pages 237–238) Agriculture (cont.)

18 Section 1-10 What are the advantages of the latifundia system? What are the advantages of the minifundia system? Possible answers: Large commercial farms are probably more efficient and profitable. Workers on large farms probably have more guarantees of employment. Small farms mean independence for farmers. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. (pages 237–238) Agriculture (cont.)

19 Industrial Growth Latin America’s physical geography–high mountain ranges and dense rain forests–has made the growth of industry and access to natural resources difficult in many areas.  Section 1-11 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Industry Political instability in some Latin American countries has made foreign investors wary of investing in Latin American industry. (pages 238–240)

20 Section 1-12 Countries with relatively stable governments and sufficient human and natural resources have begun to overcome these obstacles. Industry (cont.) (pages 238–240)

21 Maquiladoras Foreign-owned factories called maquiladoras–most of which are built along the U.S.-Mexico border– provide jobs to people in the host country.  Section 1-13 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. They also benefit the foreign corporations by allowing them to hire low-cost labor and provide duty-free exports.  On the other hand, the maquiladoras also keep wages down, may encourage dangerous jobs, and often pollute the environment. (pages 238–240) Industry (cont.)

22 Section 1-14 What is the connection between political instability and foreign investment in Latin America? Possible answers: Political turmoil can lead to strikes, demonstrations, civil wars, terrorism, and street fighting. None of these provide a good environment for business. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. (pages 238–240) Industry (cont.)

23 NAFTA By encouraging trade among the United States, Mexico, and Canada, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has strengthened Mexico’s economy.  Section 1-15 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Trade and Interdependence Other Latin American countries are watching to see whether a free trade agreement like NAFTA could help their economies as well. (page 240)

24 Section 1-16 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again. Trade and Interdependence (cont.) (page 240)

25 Section 1-17 The economic troubles of the 1980s caused many of these countries to restructure their loans to allow more time to repay, but at a higher total cost.  Repayment of foreign debt, in turn, caused needed domestic programs to be halted in some countries for lack of funds. Foreign Debts Many Latin American countries have used loans from foreign countries to finance industrial development.  Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Trade and Interdependence (cont.) (page 240)

26 Section 1-18 What are some advantages and disadvantages to NAFTA? Possible answers: There are advantages to the host country of increased employment and general economic prosperity. Disadvantages include pollution to the host country and encouragement of low-cost jobs that are sometimes dangerous. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Trade and Interdependence (cont.) (page 240)

27 Section 1-19 Transportation Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. A trans-Andean highway runs through the Andes and links cities in Chile and Argentina. Latin America’s physical geography has limited the building of roads, but the region does have a major highway system, the Pan-American Highway.  (pages 240–241)

28 Section 1-20 As a result, inland waterways such as the Amazon River, the Paraná-Paraguay Rivers, and the Panama Canal are still major transport routes for both passengers and cargo.  Air travel will help overcome the obstacles of Latin America’s physical geography, but it remains a relatively expensive mode of transportation for most Latin Americans. Some Latin American countries have good railroads; other countries lack the funds to maintain their rail systems.  Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Transportation (cont.) (pages 240–241)

29 Section 1-21 How has the geography of Latin America affected its transportation systems? Possible answers: Transportation in the region is limited because of rugged terrain in many countries. Waterways have played an important role in transportation. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Transportation (cont.) (pages 240–241)

30 Section 1-22 Communications Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Newspapers, radio, and television may be censored during political unrest.  Few Latin Americans own phones or computers, although some countries are beginning to provide public access to the Internet. Communications networks are still developing in many countries of Latin America.  (page 241)

31 Section 1-23 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Why do you think most people in Latin America do not have telephones or computers in their homes? Possible answers: Countries may not have the money to extend telephone wires–necessary for both Internet access and telephones–into remote rural areas. People may not be able to afford personal computers. Communications (cont.) (page 241)

32 Section 1-24 Checking for Understanding __ 1.farm workers; generally, people who live and work in rural areas __ 2.farm crop grown to be sold or traded rather than used by the farm family __ 3.trade agreement made in 1994 by Canada, the United States, and Mexico __ 4.country in the process of becoming industrialized __ 5.commodity sent from one country to another for purposes of trade A.export B.campesinos C.latifundia D.minifundia E.cash crop F.developing country G.service industry H.maquiladora I.North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Define Match each definition in the left column with the appropriate term in the right column. E I F A B Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

33 Section 1-25 Checking for Understanding __ 6.in Latin America, large agricultural estates owned by families or corporations __ 7.in Latin America, small farms that produce food chiefly for family use __ 8.in Mexico, manufacturing plants set up by foreign firms __ 9.business that provides a service instead of making goods C D H Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Define Match each definition in the left column with the appropriate term in the right column. G A.export B.campesinos C.latifundia D.minifundia E.cash crop F.developing country G.service industry H.maquiladora I.North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)

34 Section 1-26 Critical Thinking Drawing Conclusions Why might political instability in a country discourage investors? A military government or dictator could decide to nationalize a foreign business. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.

35 Section 1-27 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Critical Thinking Identifying Cause and Effect What effects might defaulting on debt repayments have? Defaulting on debt repayments discourages investors and hampers future borrowing ability.

36 Section 1-28 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Critical Thinking Making Comparisons How are latifundia and minifundia systems of farming alike? Different? Latifundia are large, mechanized commercial estates. Minifundia are small subsistence farms. Both are owned by wealthy landowners.

37 Section 1-29 Analyzing Maps Place Study this economic activity map. Which countries produce the most oil? Venezuela, Columbia, Ecuador, and Mexico produce the most oil. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.

38 Section 1-30 Applying Geography Industrialization In a paragraph, discuss why industrialization requires good transportation and communications systems. Describe the impact of new technologies. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Possible answer: Without good roads, trucks cannot transport raw materials and products. Expanding telephone and Internet service could speed the flow of information.

39 Section 1-31 Close Reread the opening quotation and the first paragraph on page 237 of your textbook. Volunteer ways in which Latin America’s physical environment relates to the region’s economic development and quality of life.

40 End of Section 1

41 Section 2-1 People and Their Environment Describe how development has affected Latin America’s forest resources.  Explain how Latin American governments are working to balance forest conservation with human and economic development.  Discuss the challenges posed by the growth of Latin America’s urban population.  Identify the regional and international issues that continue to pose challenges for Latin American countries. Objectives Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

42 Section 2-2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. deforestation  slash-and-burn  reforestation  shantytown Terms to Know sustainable development  People and Their Environment

43 Section 2-3 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. El Salvador São Paulo  Places to Locate People and Their Environment

44 Section 2-4 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.

45 Section 2-5 Because of industrial development, the border between Mexico and the United States has many environmental challenges. About 12 million gallons (45,424,800 l) of raw sewage flow daily into the Tijuana River, which then empties into the Pacific Ocean. Other rivers carry toxic industrial pollution into the United States. Some stretches of the Rio Grande, for example, are so polluted that the water is not safe to touch.

46 Section 2-6 Managing Rain Forests More than 13 percent of the Amazon rain forest has been destroyed for roads, settlements, and mining.  Deforestation threatens the lifestyles of indigenous people and risks the extinction of many species of plants and animals that grow or live nowhere else. Latin American rain forests are gradually disappearing.  Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 242–244)

47 Section 2-7 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Managing Rain Forests (cont.) Brazil and other rain forest countries are working to provide for the needs of their populations–living space and natural resources–without further destroying the rain forest. (pages 242–244) As the rain forest is depleted, there are fewer trees to absorb carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas that is increasingly trapping more heat in the atmosphere and contributing to global warming. 

48 Farms and Ranches Versus Forests Slash-and-burn farming–clearing land by cutting and burning vegetation– results in depleted soil that can be used for only a year or two.  Section 2-8 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Farmers and ranchers then move on and clear more land. Managing Rain Forests (cont.) (pages 242–244)

49 Section 2-9 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Brazil has set aside about 10 percent of its Amazon rain forest for national forests or parks in which logging is banned.  Citizens in Costa Rica are working to conserve their forests, as well.  Reforestation, along with new farming, mining, and logging methods can protect the forests. Planting for the Future Commercial logging operations also destroy the rain forest.  Managing Rain Forests (cont.) (pages 242–244)

50 Section 2-10 Make one suggestion for preserving the rain forest while allowing the people to make a living. Possible answers: Encourage shade farming for crops like coffee, so that fewer trees would be cut down. Have people replant areas that have been devastated. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Managing Rain Forests (cont.) (pages 242–244)

51 Section 2-11 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Urban Environments Some are forced to live in makeshift slums and shantytowns, where diseases spread rapidly because of the lack of sanitation systems or running water.  Many countries have no clean air laws, making air pollution a serious problem for people in these cities. Overcrowded Cities As Latin America’s rural workers migrate to cities, they often cannot find adequate housing or jobs.  (pages 244–245)

52 Section 2-12 Urban Environments (cont.) (pages 244–245) Building a Better Life National and local governments, international agencies, and grassroots efforts have begun to help Latin American countries address the problems of their overcrowded cities.

53 Section 2-13 What might an overpopulated city, such as Mexico City, do to combat the problem of housing? Possible answers: The national government could budget money for housing. The city government could start a program to turn abandoned buildings into housing for the working poor. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Urban Environments (cont.) (pages 244–245)

54 Section 2-14 Regional and International Issues Disputed Borders In Latin America many territorial disputes have occurred, usually over the rights to natural resources. (pages 245–247)

55 Section 2-15 Population Growth and Migration High birthrates that contribute to overpopulation in some Latin American countries have begun to slow down.  (pages 245–247) Regional and International Issues (cont.) However, many skilled workers who might otherwise remain in their home countries and help address many problems are emigrating from Latin America. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

56 Disaster Preparedness Physical geography makes Latin America especially vulnerable to natural disasters such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and hurricanes.  Section 2-16 Governments in the region are cooperating to help Latin Americans prepare for and anticipate emergencies rather than reacting after the fact. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 245–247) Regional and International Issues (cont.)

57 Section 2-17 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again. (pages 245–247) Regional and International Issues (cont.)

58 Section 2-18 Air and water pollution have increased.  Chemical runoff is now crossing borders and threatening neighbor countries. Industrial Pollution Environmental laws have not kept up with the growth of industry and commercial farms.  Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 245–247) Regional and International Issues (cont.)

59 Section 2-19 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again. (pages 245–247) Regional and International Issues (cont.)

60 Section 2-20 What might Latin American countries do to encourage skilled, educated people not to emigrate? Possible answers: Attract foreign investment to provide employment for them. Offer them government grants. Hire them to set up businesses or government programs that will benefit the country and make good use of their skills and education. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. (pages 245–247) Regional and International Issues (cont.)

61 Section 2-21 Checking for Understanding __ 1.makeshift communities on the edges of cities __ 2.traditional farming method in which all trees and plants in an area are cut and burned to add nutrients to the soil __ 3.technological and economic growth that does not deplete the human and natural resources of a given area A.sustainable development B.deforestation C.slash-and- burn D.reforestation E.shantytown Define Match each definition in the left column with the appropriate term in the right column. C A E Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

62 Section 2-22 Checking for Understanding __ 4.replanting young trees or seeds on lands where trees have been cut or destroyed __ 5.the loss or destruction of forests, mainly for logging or farming D B Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Define Match each definition in the left column with the appropriate term in the right column. A.sustainable development B.deforestation C.slash-and- burn D.reforestation E.shantytown

63 Section 2-23 Critical Thinking Predicting Consequences How might the destruction of the Amazon rain forest affect your life? Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Possible answer: Destruction of the Amazon rain forest might send urban expansion into rural areas and open up more transportation networks.

64 Section 2-24 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Critical Thinking Making Comparisons Compare the ways urban populations in Latin America and those in your state have modified their physical environments. Overcrowding and unaffordable housing are issues in both regions.

65 Section 2-25 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Drawing Conclusions What circumstances might make environmental protection a low priority for some Latin American governments? Leaders might see industrial and economic development as an immediate priority. Critical Thinking

66 Section 2-26 Analyzing Maps Human-Environment Interaction Study the maps of the Amazon rain forest below. What kinds of activities are responsible for these changes? Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.

67 Section 2-27 Analyzing Maps Logging, slash-and-burn agriculture, mining, cattle ranching, and resettlement are responsible for these changes.

68 Section 2-28 Applying Geography Mental Mapping Without consulting a map, identify the Latin American countries most at risk from hurricanes. Write a description of ways that a hurricane is a threat to these countries.

69 Section 2-29 Close Create a crossword puzzle using one clue and word from each subhead in this section.

70 End of Section 2

71 Chapter Summary 1 Latin America’s economy is based on the export of agricultural products.  A small group of wealthy families or businesses owns a large percentage of the agricultural land in Latin America.  The economy of many Latin American countries is linked to one or two cash crops.  The maquiladora system, trade agreements, and international borrowing are attempts to speed the industrialization of many Latin American countries. Key Points Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Section 1: Living in Latin America (pages 237–241)

72 Chapter Summary 2 Geographic and economic realities have presented obstacles to developing transportation and communications in the region. Key Points Section 1: Living in Latin America (pages 237–241)

73 Chapter Summary 3 Section 2: People and Their Environment (pages 242–247) A key challenge for the Latin American region is sustainable development.  Damage to the Amazon rain forest has both local and global consequences.  Slash-and-burn cultivation contributes to Latin America’s environmental challenges.  Latin America’s urban environmental problems are a result of rapid urbanization. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Key Points

74 Chapter Summary 4 Section 2: People and Their Environment (pages 242–247) Solutions to the region’s environmental concerns will come through cooperation among local, national, regional, and international governments and organizations. Key Points

75 End of Chapter Summary

76 Chapter Assessment 1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Checking for Understanding __ 1.the loss or destruction of forests, mainly for logging or farming __ 2.technological and economic growth that does not deplete the human and natural resources of a given area __ 3.in Latin America, large agricultural estates owned by families or corporations __ 4.farm crop grown to be sold or traded rather than used by the farm family A.campesino B.latifundia C.minifundia D.maquiladora E.cash crop F.sustainable development G.deforestation H.service industry I.reforestation J.shantytown Define Match each definition in the left column with the appropriate term in the right column. F B E G

77 Chapter Assessment 2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Checking for Understanding __ 5.farm workers; generally, people who live and work in rural areas __ 6.in Latin America, small farms that produce food chiefly for family use __ 7.makeshift communities on the edges of cities __ 8.in Mexico, manufacturing plants set up by foreign firms __ 9.replanting young trees or seeds on lands where trees have been cut or destroyed __10.business that provides a service instead of making goods A.campesino B.latifundia C.minifundia D.maquiladora E.cash crop F.sustainable development G.deforestation H.service industry I.reforestation J.shantytown Define Match each definition in the left column with the appropriate term in the right column. C J D A I H

78 Chapter Assessment 3 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. What three cash crops supply much of Latin America’s income? Coffee, bananas, and sugarcane supply much of Latin America’s income. Reviewing Facts Section 1: Living in Latin America

79 Chapter Assessment 4 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. How can dependence on a single crop affect a country’s economy? Natural disasters can wipe out an entire year’s crops. Reviewing Facts Section 1: Living in Latin America

80 Chapter Assessment 5 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. How do unstable governments prevent industrial development? Investors are wary of doing business there. Reviewing Facts Section 1: Living in Latin America

81 Chapter Assessment 6 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. What obstacles have slowed the development of Latin America’s transportation and communications systems? Lack of government funds and difficult geographical barriers have slowed down the development of Latin America’s transportation and communications systems. Reviewing Facts Section 1: Living in Latin America

82 Chapter Assessment 7 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. What are the environmental effects of slash-and-burn cultivation? Deforestation, loss of the rain forest, and leaching of soil nutrients by erosion are the environmental effects of slash-and-burn cultivation. Reviewing Facts Section 2: People and Their Environment

83 Chapter Assessment 8 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Why do some people believe that preservation of the Amazon rain forest is a global concern? Some people believe that the Amazon rain forest acts as a filtering system for the atmosphere, produces oxygen, and decreases atmospheric carbon dioxide. Reviewing Facts Section 2: People and Their Environment

84 Chapter Assessment 9 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. How are Latin American countries addressing the problems resulting from rapid urbanization? Latin American countries are building new water supply systems, expanding public transportation, and using abandoned buildings to house the homeless. Reviewing Facts Section 2: People and Their Environment

85 Chapter Assessment 10 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Why do border disputes slow the economic development of the Latin American region? Disputes divert resources that could be better spent on human services and development. Reviewing Facts Section 2: People and Their Environment

86 Chapter Assessment 11 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Critical Thinking Making Generalizations Has the maquiladora system had a positive or a negative effect on Mexico’s people? Explain. The system had a positive effect because it employed local people, offered investment incomes, and made goods cheaper to buy. The system had a negative effect because it damaged the environment, ignored labor laws, and created low-paying jobs.

87 Chapter Assessment 12 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Critical Thinking Predicting Consequences How might the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) change migration patterns in Latin America? What are the implications? Possible answer: NAFTA might slow migration by creating jobs in local industries.

88 Chapter Assessment 13 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Locating Places Match the letters on the map with the places of Latin America. __1.Panama __2.Belém __3.Brazil __4.São Paulo __5.Santiago __6.Bogotá __7.Costa Rica __8.Lima __9.Mexico __10.Rio de Janeiro __11.Mexico City D E B G I F J A H K C

89 Chapter Assessment 14 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. What would be the best way for the owner of a latifundium in Ecuador to ship a banana crop to the eastern United States? Possible answers: Owners of latifundia could ship their crops by truck on the Pan-American Highway, by freight car on a railway, on a barge through the Panama Canal, or by boat on the Amazon River.

90 End of Chapter Assessment

91 Geography Online Explore online information about the topics introduced in this chapter. Click on the Connect button to launch your browser and go to the Glencoe World Geography Web site. At this site, you will find interactive activities, current events information, and Web sites correlated with the chapters and units in the textbook. When you finish exploring, exit the browser program to return to this presentation. If you experience difficulty connecting to the Web site, manually launch your Web browser and go to

92 STP 1 Choose the best answer for the following multiple- choice question. If you have trouble answering the question, use the process of elimination to narrow your choices.

93 STP 2 1.On average, 34 of every 1,000 Latin Americans owned computers in Which countries had higher rates of computer ownership than the regional average? ANicaragua and Panama BArgentina, Mexico, Panama, and Uruguay CArgentina, Mexico, and Uruguay DGuatemala, Nicaragua, and Panama Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Test-Taking Tip Reread the title and x- and y-axis labels of the graph to determine the information the graph shows. Notice that Guatemala, Nicaragua, and Panama all fall short of the regional average. Tackle each answer choice one by one, eliminating those that contain even one country that has a lower rate than the regional average.

94 GeoFact 1 Environmentalists express concern over the possible effects of unregulated industrial growth brought about by NAFTA. The monarch butterfly, which migrates annually between Canada and Mexico, is serving as a monitor of environmental changes. Scientists keep track of the monarch butterfly to determine NAFTA’s effects on the environment.

95 Interdisciplinary Connection 2 Health The Brazil nut tree has the potential to treat or prevent health ailments. In the Amazon rain forest, indigenous people use the oil from this nut, which is rich in vitamin E and selenium, to treat skin conditions. Antioxidants may also help slow the progression of eye cataracts. Researchers are also studying the Brazil nut as possible treatments for Alzheimer’s disease.

96 FYI 1 HondurasHonduras Many Hondurans communicate by placing messages on the radio. They do so because only major cities in Honduras have telephones, while most towns have only one public telephone and a telegraph office.

97 Honduras BananasMachinery Language:Spanish Population:6,700, per square mi. 60 per square km Landmass:43,278 square mi. 112,090 square km Currency:Lempira Government:Republic Major Export Major Import

98 SkillBuilder 1 Creating an Outline Outlining may be used as a starting point for a reader who wants to understand and organize information. The reader begins with the rough shape of the material and gradually fills in the details in a logical manner.

99 SkillBuilder 2 Learning the Skill Outlining can be used as a method of note taking and organizing information. There are two types of outlines– informal and formal. An informal outline is similar to taking notes–you write words and phrases needed to remember main ideas. A formal outline has a standard format.  To make a formal outline, begin by thinking about big ideas and dividing them into units of information. Give each of these major ideas a heading–a word or phrase that will identify the concept. Each major idea will be followed by two or more subtopics, or parts of main ideas. Include supporting details within each subtopic. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Creating an Outline

100 SkillBuilder 3 To create a formal outline, follow these steps:  Learning the Skill Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Identify the general topic of the outline, and write the topic as a question. Refer to the topic question as you work to be sure you are recording the most important ideas.  Write the main ideas that answer this question. Label these with Roman numerals.  Write subtopics under each main idea. Label these with capital letters.  Write supporting details for each subtopic. Label these with Arabic numerals and lowercase letters. Creating an Outline

101 SkillBuilder 4 Practicing the Skill 1.What are the most important topics in Chapter 10, Section 2? The most important topics in Chapter 10, Section 2 are Managing Rain Forests, Urban Environments, and Regional and International Issues. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display possible answer. Study the incomplete outline of Chapter 10, Section 2, on page 250 of your textbook. The main ideas generally correspond to the section headings in the chapter. Fill in the missing information for Section 2 of Chapter 10. When you have completed your outline, answer the following questions: Creating an Outline

102 SkillBuilder 5 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display possible answer. Practicing the Skill Study the incomplete outline of Chapter 10, Section 2, on page 250 of your textbook. The main ideas generally correspond to the section headings in the chapter. Fill in the missing information for Section 2 of Chapter 10. When you have completed your outline, answer the following questions: 2.What are the four main subtopics under the heading “Regional and International Issues”? The four main subtopics are disputed borders, population growth and migration, disaster preparedness, and industrial pollution. Creating an Outline

103 SkillBuilder 6 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display possible answer. Practicing the Skill Study the incomplete outline of Chapter 10, Section 2, on page 250 of your textbook. The main ideas generally correspond to the section headings in the chapter. Fill in the missing information for Section 2 of Chapter 10. When you have completed your outline, answer the following questions: 3.What are two situations in which an outline such as this might be useful? Possible answers: An outline such as this is useful when giving a talk or taking notes. Creating an Outline

104 SkillBuilder 7 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display possible answer. Practicing the Skill Study the incomplete outline of Chapter 10, Section 2, on page 250 of your textbook. The main ideas generally correspond to the section headings in the chapter. Fill in the missing information for Section 2 of Chapter 10. When you have completed your outline, answer the following questions: 4.In addition to being useful to readers, how would an outline help writers? An outline would help writers stay organized. Creating an Outline

105 Maps and Charts Contents Map The Shrinking Rain Forest Charts Mexico: Workers in Maquiladoras Population Growth in Selected Cities Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slide.

106 Maps and Charts 1

107 Maps and Charts 2

108 Maps and Charts 3

109 Political Map Transparency

110 Daily Focus Skills Transparency 1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.

111 Daily Focus Skills Transparency 2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.

112 End of Custom Shows WARNING! Do Not Remove This slide is intentionally blank and is set to auto-advance to end custom shows and return to the main presentation.

113 End of Slide Show


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