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TH1RTEEN R3ASONS WHY 8 th Grade ELA. PURPOSE 13 Reasons Why is a contemporary novel written by Jay Asher. This is a story of a teenage girl living in.

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Presentation on theme: "TH1RTEEN R3ASONS WHY 8 th Grade ELA. PURPOSE 13 Reasons Why is a contemporary novel written by Jay Asher. This is a story of a teenage girl living in."— Presentation transcript:

1 TH1RTEEN R3ASONS WHY 8 th Grade ELA

2 PURPOSE 13 Reasons Why is a contemporary novel written by Jay Asher. This is a story of a teenage girl living in a small town. This novel is very high-interest and includes very sensitive topics. I hope that by reading we accomplish three tasks (in addition to learning the standards in the curriculum):  Create an open dialog about bullying and suicide with the intention of prevention.  Realize that all actions have ripple effects.  Increase our levels of empathy and understanding.

3 THE BOTTOM LINE Teen suicide is a scary and real topic. If you are feeling overwhelmed or suicidal, please seek help, either from a counselor, parent or online/phone resource. Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline National Suicide Hotline SUICIDE ( ) National Institute for Mental Health HOPE National Institute for Mental Health See my website for other links.website

4 PRE-READING 13 Reasons Why

5 ABOUT THE AUTHOR Except for six months in Wyoming, I've lived my entire life in California. It was during those six months in Sheridan, Wyoming that I came up with the idea for Thirteen Reasons Why. I've worked at an independent bookstore, a chain bookstore, an outlet bookstore, and two public libraries. Before those jobs, I worked at a shoe store, a trophy shop, and an airline. My very first writing award earned me a free fruit smoothie every day for a year. I've won a lot of awards since then, but that one tasted the best!

6 AWARDS AND OTHER INFO Turn to the 5 th page of the book. Read the awards, praise and readers’ comments. For more information, visit thirteenreasonswhy.com.thirteenreasonswhy.com

7 CURSE WORDS IN BOOKS Curse words only have as much power as we give them. How can a writer effectively capture a character who is a racist, a drug addict, or an abuser without giving that character authentic language to speak? In a moment of rage, I know I do not cry “Oh muffins!” CCSS RL.8.3 Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

8 SO…WE CAN READ CURSE WORDS, BUT WE CAN’T SAY THEM IN SCHOOL? EXACTLY! We read about racism in Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry, but it’s not allowed in school. We read about violence in The Outsiders, but it’s not allowed in school. This is authentic dialog/language for our character. End of story. I don’t expect you to think this is a free pass to repeat it. I expect you to have the maturity to read it and acknowledge the need for authentic dialog. After all, we have learned that authentic dialog is necessary to be a good writer! CCSS RL.8.3 Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

9 UNCOMFORTABLE CONTENT There will be things that happen in this book that make me uncomfortable. They might make you uncomfortable too. Unfortunately, I’m uncomfortable because these are things that happen every day to teenagers in our country. I wish that we could live in a world free of bullies, gossip and lies. Maybe that’s why we read about it. CCSS RL.8.3 Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

10 BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE 13 Reasons Why

11 BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE We are going to be doing some research about different topics from the book, such as bullying, suicide, harassment, teasing and assault. In your groups, you will be responsible for creating a Google Presentation (which is similar to a Power Point) that shares information about these topics. CCSS W. 8.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

12 GOOGLE PRESENTATIONS 1.Get in your assigned groups. 2.Visit my webpage (www.kflater.weebly.com)www.kflater.weebly.com 3.Click on the 13 Reasons Why tab 4.Find your hour and topic 5.Open the presentation CCSS W. 8.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

13 GOOGLE PRESENTATIONS Answer the questions on the handout you were given. You may want to divvy out questions to different group members. Each of the questions will then become a slide on your presentation. CCSS W. 8.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

14 GOOGLE PRESENTATION Follow the guidelines at the following webpage to create a strong presentation. professional-presentation/ Your group will be presenting to the class, so decide who is going to say what and PRACTICE! CCSS W. 8.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

15 LITERARY DOMINOES TH1RTEEN R3ASONS WHY

16 DOMINOES In your group, set up a chain of dominoes at least 25 pieces long. What happens when you knock over the first domino? CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.3CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.3 Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

17 LITERARY DOMINOES Just like the game of dominoes, there are actions and reactions in novels. In Thirteen Reasons Why, you will be asked to determine the final outcome as well as the events that led to this outcome. Throughout the novel, you will keep a set of “plot cards” or index cards. As each major plot event happens, jot it down with the page number on the card and write a short 2-5 sentence summary of what happened. At the end of the novel, you will be asked to set the cards up like dominoes, leading to the final event. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.3CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.3 Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

18 SAMPLE CARD CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.10CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6–8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

19 PAGES 1-35 TH1RTEEN R3ASONS WHY

20 WRITING PROMPT (1-35) Sir? Why does this novel start with this word? Make predictions and connections. CCSS RL.8.3 Analyze how particular lines of dialog or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

21 RESPOND Why “Sir?” Share your ideas. CCSS RL.8.3 Analyze how particular lines of dialog or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

22 BEGIN READING Read pages 1-4 out loud. CCSS RL8.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

23 DISCUSS Is this book engaging at the beginning? Why or why not? What would you consider to be a good book opening? CCSSSL.8.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade 8 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

24 DISCUSS  What do you find engaging on a cover?  What do you find interesting on the first page? CCSSSL.8.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade 8 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

25 TAPE 1: JUSTIN FOLEY Need a volunteer to read Clay’s intro (pages 5-6) Cassette 1: Side A (pages 7-28) Cassette 1: Side B (pages 28-31) JibmlC1R9A&feature=share&list=PL388735F120BA5657http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=- JibmlC1R9A&feature=share&list=PL388735F120BA5657 Finish pages on your own. CCSS RL8.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

26 BEWARE OF SURPRISE GIFTS Clay is initially thrilled to receive a package, but quickly changes his tune. What are some potential consequences of Hannah’s tapes? Could the consequences be worse than she hoped?  Discuss in small groups and as a class whether or not the gift will do what Hannah expects.  Why is Clay so upset about the tapes?  What are the desired effects, and could there be other reasons? CCSS RL.8.6 Analyze how differences in points of view of the characters and the audience or reader create such effects as suspense or humor.

27 ENRICHMENT Read O. Henry’s “The Gift of the Magi” to understand how gifts often have unintended effects: Writing Prompt– How does this story connect to Thirteen Reasons Why? Consider the tapes as a gift for or from Hannah when constructing your 1 page response. CCS RL.8.5 Compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts and analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to its meaning and style.

28 PAGE TH1RTEEN R3ASONS WHY

29 CASSETTE 1: SIDE B ALEX STANDALL Pages (Read with tape) Pages (Read on your own) Pages (Read with tape) Pages (Reciprocal teaching/reading) ist=PLC E4D8AB CCSS RL8.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

30 TRUTH OR RUMOR Discuss whether you think Hannah’s rumor would have stopped, if any one person hadn’t passed it on. Connect this to your life – we hear rumors all the time. Come up with five things you could do next time you hear a rumor. Discuss the best options. CCSSSL.8.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade 8 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

31 TWISTED RUMORS Remember the game of telephone? Let’s play! Please do your best to repeat exactly what is heard. CCSS SL.8.3 Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and relevance and sufficiency of the evidence and identifying when irrelevant evidence is introduced.

32 TWISTED RUMORS What does this teach you about rumors? Can they always be trusted? How quickly can something be misunderstood? CCSS SL.8.3 Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and relevance and sufficiency of the evidence and identifying when irrelevant evidence is introduced.

33 WRITING PROMPT (36-53)  Think of a problem at home or at school that you feel comfortable sharing. In your packet, map out plausible reasons that trace the logical progression of the problem. Make sure that the sequence of events is in order.  Hannah doesn’t seem to take responsibility for her actions. What responsibility do you have in your own problem? CCSS W.8.9 Apply grade 8 Reading standards to literature

34 INVESTIGATE How many times have we received an or a post, along with six million other people, that turns out to be a hoax? Hannah states that for any problem, there are thirteen different explanations from thirteen different perspectives. Investigate Snopes, the urban legend fact finder (www.snopes.com). Click on the top scams of the day. With a partner, pick the scam with the closest connection to what Hannah’s classmates think. Present your evidence to other groups or to the entire class.www.snopes.com CCSS W.8.7 Conduct short research projects to answer a question

35 PAGES TH1RTEEN R3ASONS WHY

36 CASSETTE 2: SIDE A JESSICA DAVIS Pages (Read as class) Page (Read with tape) Ow&feature=share&list=PLC E4D8 AB CCSS RL8.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

37 MORE THAN A SCRATCH Writing Prompt (54-68): Hannah describes her fight with Jessica on this tape. She also says that the fight ended with Jessica scratching her, leaving her fingernail in Hannah’s forehead. This left a mark which turned into a scar. Every time Hannah looked at the scar, she didn’t see a blemish but a reminder of this event. We might call this emotional scarring with physical evidence. Do you have anything physical that triggers an emotional reaction? CCSS W.8.10 Write routinely over extended time frames for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

38 WHAT IS A GOOD FRIEND? Open your packet to the “What is a Good Friend?” page. Complete the chart. 1.A good friend is loyal. 2.A good friend is intelligent. 3.A good friend is sensitive. 4.A good friend has a sense of humor. 5.A good friend is honest. 6.A good friend listens. 7.A good friend is supportive. 8.A good friend is generous. CCSS RL.8.1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

39 PAGES TH1RTEEN R3ASONS WHY

40 CASSETTE 2: SIDE B TYLER DOWN Pages (Read as a group) Pages (With the tapes) Pages (Reciprocal teaching/reading) CCSS RL8.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

41 DISCUSSION Tyler is described as “creepy.” Many in our society also describe the press or paparazzi as creepy too. Does Tyler have any redeeming value? What is the value, if any, of the pictures he takes? Examine yearbooks (yearbooks at least ten years old). Find various pictures that hint at a bigger story. Copy the pictures and write caption stories beneath that provide a plausible explanation. Technology Integration: Look at the way professionals manipulate images on sites like CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.3CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.3 Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

42 PEEPING TOM The name comes from the legend of Lady Godiva's naked ride through the streets of Coventry, in order to persuade her husband to alleviate the harsh taxes on the town's poor. The story goes that the townsfolk agreed not to observe Godiva as she passed by, but that Peeping Tom broke that trust and spied on her. The ride is still commemorated (clothed) in the city each year. As the picture shows, there's no longer any taboo about watching it. Whatever the truth of the ride through the town, there are no accounts of this story which mentioned a 'Peeping Tom' character until the 18th century and that has to been seen as a later invention. Why that embellishment was given to the story isn't clear. The name 'Peeping Tom' is first recorded in the Coventry city accounts in 1773, recording a new wig and paint for the effigy of Tom the Tailor (which clearly must have existed for some time prior to that). The first record that alludes to his dubious habits is in Grose's Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, 1796: "Peeping Tom, a nick name for a curious prying fellow." Peeping Toms aren't of course restricted to mediaeval times. Towards the end of the 20th century they got a new activity to partake in, or at least a new name was given to an old activity. The term dogging was coined in the UK - meaning 'spying on couples having sex in a car or some other public place'. CCSS L.8.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words or phrases based on grade 8 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

43 ETYMOLOGY Sometimes a mere definition won’t do. We want to know the history of a word or phrase. That’s when we look up the etymology of the word. 1.Visit 2.Look up the words in your packet to find the history of the word or phrase 3.Is it what you expected? CCSS L.8.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words or phrases based on grade 8 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

44 PAGES TH1RTEEN R3ASONS WHY

45 CASSETTE 3: SIDE A COURTNEY CRIMSEN Pages (Read with tapes) Pages (Read as a class) CCSS RL8.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

46 WHAT’S THE REAL STORY? With a partner, choose a yearbook from the counter. Look at the pictures, and try to relate to this chapter. What’s the real story? Is High School as great as the yearbook portrays?

47 MUST HAVE KILLED HER Page 95 – Courtney does come off as genuinely sweet. Hearing her story here, on these tapes, must have killed her. What literary device is used in this passage? CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.5aCCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.5a Interpret figures of speech (e.g. verbal irony, puns) in context.

48 FIGURES OF SPEECH We’re going to focus on 2 types of Figures of Speech: 1.Metaphors 2.Similes CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.5aCCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.5a Interpret figures of speech (e.g. verbal irony, puns) in context.

49 METAPHORS AND SIMILES Metaphors and similes are tools an author uses for comparisons. Let’s play Battleship like a boss! CCSS L.8.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. That’s a simile! CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.5aCCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.5a Interpret figures of speech (e.g. verbal irony, puns) in context.

50 WHAT IN THE WORLD ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT? The first thing you need to understand is the difference between similes and metaphors.  Both are examples of figurative language.  Both are used to compare seemingly unrelated items.  The big difference…2 words: like or as. CCSS L.8.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.5aCCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.5a Interpret figures of speech (e.g. verbal irony, puns) in context.

51 METAPHOR OR SIMILE? Her hands were as cold as ice. (Simile) Her hands were chunks of ice. (Metaphor) Her cheeks were like faded roses. (Simile) The roses in her cheeks are faded. (Metaphor) He was my knight in shining armor. Computers are the vehicles of tomorrow. All the world's a stage. Good as gold. Carry a torch for someone. Like a bull in a china shop. Have your cake and eat it too. Hot as heck! Life is like a box of chocolates. Right as rain CCSS L.8.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.5aCCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.5a Interpret figures of speech (e.g. verbal irony, puns) in context.

52 YOUR TURN! Write 3 metaphors and 3 similes in your workbook. They should be original ideas, not common sayings. CCSS L.8.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.5aCCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.5a Interpret figures of speech (e.g. verbal irony, puns) in context.

53 PAGES TH1RTEEN R3ASONS WHY

54 ISN’T IT IRONIC? CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.5aCCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.5a Interpret figures of speech (e.g. verbal irony, puns) in context.

55 ACTUALLY, IT’S NOT! CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.5aCCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.5a Interpret figures of speech (e.g. verbal irony, puns) in context.

56 CAN YOU IDENTIFY IRONY? As we read, there will be instances of irony in this chapter. Can you identify them? Has anything ironic happened to you? Complete the page from your packet titled “Irony”. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.5aCCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.5a Interpret figures of speech (e.g. verbal irony, puns) in context.

57 CASSETTE 3: SIDE B MARCUS COOLEY Read (As a class) Read (With the tapes) Read (By yourself) CCSS RL8.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

58 PAGES TH1RTEEN R3ASONS WHY

59 CASSETTE 4: SIDE A ZACH DEMPSEY Read (Reciprocal teaching/reading) Read 163 (With tapes) Read (With class) Read (With tapes) Read (By yourself) CCSS RL8.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

60 ONE KIND THING Turn to page 156-  We are going to have our very own activity just like this called “One Kind Thing”  When you think of “One Kind Thing” to say to a classmate, drop a note in his or her paper pocket  In 1 week, we’ll read them! CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.4CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

61 PAGES TH1RTEEN R3ASONS WHY

62 CASSETTE 4: SIDE B RYAN Read pages (As a class) Read pages (With tapes) Read pages (By yourself) CCSS RL8.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

63 HANNAH’S POEM Turn to page 190 T2LaqbA CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.2CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

64 SOUL ALONE BY HANNAH BAKER I meet your eyes you don’t even see me You hardly respond when I whisper hello Could be my soul mate two kindred spirits Maybe we’re not I guess we’ll never know My own mother you carried me in you Now you see nothing but what I wear People ask you how I am doing You smile and nod don’t let it end there Put me underneath God’s sky and know me don’t just see me with your eyes Take away this mask of flesh and bone and see me for my soul alone CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.2CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

65 HOW CAN WE READ POETRY? 1.Line by line for a literal translation 2.Go back over the literal translation to find meaning CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.2CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

66 STILL DON’T GET IT? IT’S REALLY PRETTY SIMPLE! Poetry is an expression…like art, music, writing, or dancing. Could be expressing a feeling Could be telling a story Could be sharing an image Could be teaching a lesson Basically, it does what the author wants it to do! CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.2CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

67 LET’S TRY SOME ANALYSIS! CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.2CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

68 THE RED WHEELBARROW BY WILLIAM CARLOS WILLIAMS so much depends upon a red wheel barrow glazed with rain water beside the white chickens. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.2CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

69 YOUR TURN! We’re going to visit the LMC to look through the poetry books. Choose a book, sit at the tables, and read through it. Find a poem that sounds interesting to you. Complete the “Poetry Analysis” page from your packet. Be prepared to share your poem and analysis with the class. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.2CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

70 PAGES TH1RTEEN R3ASONS WHY

71 CASSETTE 5: SIDE A CLAY Read pages (Reciprocal reading) Pages (With tape) Pages (By yourself) CCSS RL8.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

72 AFTER THE DEATH OF ANNA GONZALES Each of you (with your assigned partner) will get a poem from this book. Practice reading it out loud for meaning. 1.How does it remind you of 13 Reasons Why? 2.What is this poem saying? CCSS RL.8.5 Compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts and analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to its meaning and style.

73 QUESTIONS: 1. HOW DOES IT REMIND YOU OF 13 REASONS WHY? 2. WHAT IS THIS POEM SAYING?

74 PAGES TH1RTEEN R3ASONS WHY

75 CASSETTE 5: SIDE B JUSTIN AND ??? Read pages (Read as a class) Read pages 229 (With tape) Read pages (Read by yourself) CCSS RL8.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

76 GUILT Do you think Hannah feels guilty for her part in the rape? Is she just as at fault as everyone else? Is Justin at fault? Are you guilty if you just sit by and let something horrible happen? CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.3CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.3 Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

77 DISCUSSION It is too late for Clay to do anything to help Hannah, but what is his responsibility, if any, toward Bryce and Jessica? What would you do? We have looked at individual responsibility toward Hannah, but what is the group responsibility? In your personal reflection, consider the collective responsibility of the school and the people on Hannah’s list; compare this with how you see your own personal responsibility. Answer the question of whether or not you would mail the tapes. Would you tell Hannah’s parents? The school administration? Your own family? The police? CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.3CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.3 Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

78 WRITING PROMPT - GUILT Think about a time when you stood by and let something bad happen. Write about that time. Take responsibility for your part. Identify how you will change your actions in the future. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.4CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

79 PAGES TH1RTEEN R3ASONS WHY

80 CASSETTE 6: SIDE A JENNY Read pages Read pages (With tapes) Read pages (With class) Read pages 246 (With tapes) Read pages (By yourself) CCSS RL8.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

81 CENTRAL IDEA Jenny Kurtz knocked over a stop sign. Hannah does not report this fact and a student dies. Make a “road sign” that shares the central message of the novel, using a word pun. Think – “Stop Bullying” for a Stop sign CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.2CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

82 DESIGN A SIGN – WHAT WOULD IT SAY? SKETCH YOUR DESIGN ON THE “DESIGN A SIGN” PAGE OF THE PACKET. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.2CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text. STOP BULLYING

83 PAGES TH1RTEEN R3ASONS WHY

84 CASSETTE 6: SIDE B BRYCE Read pages (With class) Read pages (With tapes) Read pages (By yourself) A9E&feature=share&list=PLC E4D8AB&index=13http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g_dIAhF- A9E&feature=share&list=PLC E4D8AB&index=13 CCSS RL8.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

85 SELF-FULFILLING PROPHESY The self-fulfilling prophecy is a statement that alters actions and therefore comes true. For example, a person stating “I’m probably going to have a lousy day,” might alter his actions so that such a prediction is fulfilled by his actions. This may be an unconscious gesture. A person who might espouse a self-fulfilling prophecy in a positive way “I’m going to have a great day,” might act in ways that will actually make this prediction true.

86 EXAMPLES * You expect your new classmate to be shy so you don’t speak much to him, and he therefore does seem shy. * A coach expects new players to be uncoordinated and unskilled so he does not play them often, and when he does they are rusty and do not perform well. * Your teacher expects you to do well and she spends extra time with you preparing for the exam, so you get an A.

87 HANNAH’S SELF-FULFILLING PROPHECY She finally acted on the rumors that surrounded her. Hannah wasn’t doing what she thought was right but what others thought was true.

88 WRITING PROMPT Do rumors have the ability to change your perception about yourself? Turn to the page “Self Fulfilling Prophecy” in your packet and respond using personal anecdotes. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.9CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

89 PAGES TH1RTEEN R3ASONS WHY

90 CASSETTE 7: SIDE A MR. POTTER Read pages (As a class) Read pages 269 (With tapes) Read pages (Reciprocal reading) CCSS RL8.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

91 WRITING PROMPT Imagine that you are Mr. Porter and Hannah comes to you, what would you have done differently? What would you have said to Hannah?

92 PAGES TH1RTEEN R3ASONS WHY

93 CASSETTE 7: SIDE B Read pages (As a class) CCSS RL8.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

94 DISCUSSION The Beginning: At the very end of the book, Clay ends the book by saying, “Skye.” Is there a significance to ending the book this way? Have you changed? How and why? CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.4CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

95 WRITING PROMPT Turn to the page titled “Final Thoughts” in your packet. Write your final thoughts, including how effective Asher is with his novel. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.1CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.1 Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence

96 FINAL ACTIVITIES TH1RTEEN R3ASONS WHY

97 FAVORITE QUOTES Find 13 different quotes that “speak to you” from the novel. These quotes should provide an insight into how to lead your life. Copy the 13 quotes and pages numbers onto the page titled “Favorite Quotes” in your packet. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.3CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.3 Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

98 CREATE A QUOTE PAGE BASED ON YOUR THIRTEEN FAVORITE QUOTATIONS FROM THE BOOK

99 FINAL ASSESSMENTS TH1RTEEN R3ASONS WHY

100 FINAL ASSESSMENTS Your final “test” or evaluation for this novel will have 4 parts: Part 1 – Prepare a Paper Bag Presentation Part 2 – Present Paper Bag Presentation Part 3 – Listen to and evaluation Paper Bag Presentations Part 4 – Write a compare and contrast essay CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.4 Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with relevant evidence, sound valid reasoning, and well- chosen details; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.4 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.5 Integrate multimedia and visual displays into presentations to clarify information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add interest. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.5 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.6 Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See grade 8 Language standards 1 and 3 here for specific expectations.) CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.6here

101 MY CHARACTER’S LIFE IN A BAG This exercise will allow you to “speak” for your character and clarify his or her thoughts and identity. Directions: Select a character from the novel Thirteen Reasons Why. Bring six items in a paper bag that represent important aspects about your character. Or, if you’d prefer, make a presentation that would work as a “digital paper bag”. For each object, provide evidence (1-2 quotations) from the novel. 1.An award or object that would feel like an award to your character. 2.An item that represents your character’s identity. 3.A book or poem that relates to your character or represents him or her. 4.A piece of artwork or song that relates to your character or represents him or her. 5.An object that symbolizes something important to your character. 6.An object that symbolizes something important to your character.

102 SAMPLE “DIGITAL PAPER BAG” ARTIFACT – CLAY JENSEN

103 OBJECT 1: AN AWARD OR OBJECT THAT WOULD FEEL LIKE AN AWARD TO YOUR CHARACTER. Nice Guy Award

104 ORAL PRESENTATION RUBRIC CATEGORY4321 Aspects of CharacterShows a full understanding of the aspects of the character. Shows a good understanding of the aspects of the character. Shows a partial understanding of the aspects of the character. Does not seem to understand the character very well. Items in BagContains 6 thoughtful and appropriate items. Contains 6 appropriate items. Contains 6 items, but not all seem appropriate. Contains inappropriate or insufficient items. Development of Supporting Evidence Provides supporting evidence clearly and fully. Satisfactorily provides supporting evidence. Partially provides supporting evidence. Minimally provides supporting evidence. Organization and Coherence Exhibits and exemplary logical and coherent structure. Exhibits satisfactorily a logical and coherent structure. Partial coherence and cohesiveness. Minimal coherence and cohesiveness. Stays on TopicStays on topic all (100%) of the time. Stays on topic most (90- 99%) of the time. Stays on topic some (75- 89%) of the time. On topic less than 75% of the time. Command of spoken language Always (100%) demonstrates command of spoken language and English conventions Mostly (80-99%) demonstrates command of spoken language and English conventions Sometimes (70-79%) demonstrates command of spoken language and English conventions Demonstrates command of spoken language and English conventions less than 70% of the time.

105 ORAL PRESENTATION RUBRIC CONTINUED CATEGORY4321 Posture and Eye ContactStands up straight, looks relaxed and confident. Establishes eye contact with everyone in the room during presentation. Stands up straight and establishes eye contact with everyone in the room during the presentation. Sometimes stands up straight and establishes eye contact. Slouches and/or does not look at the people during the presentation. Speaks ClearlySpeaks clearly and distinctly all (100%) the time. Speaks clearly and distinctly almost all (95- 99%) the time. Speaks clearly and distinctly most (94-85%) the time. Speaks clearly and distinctly less than 85% of the time. PreparednessStudent is completely prepared and has obviously rehearsed. Students seems pretty prepared but might have needed a couple more rehearsals. The student is somewhat prepared, but it is clear that rehearsal was lacking. Student does not seem at all prepared to present. Listens to Other Presentations Listens intently. Does not make distracting noises or movements. Listens intently but has one distracting noise or movement. Sometimes does not appear to be listening but is not distracting. Sometimes does not appear to be listening and has distracting noises or movements. Evaluates PeersAnswers all three evaluation questions when evaluating each peer with thoughtful answers. Answers all three evaluation questions when evaluating each peer. Answers two evaluation questions when evaluating each peer. Answers one evaluation question when evaluating each peer.

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107 PEER EVALUATION QUESTIONS 1.Discuss one thing that you liked about the presentation. 2.Discuss one thing that showed effort. 3.Discuss one thing that could be improved. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.3CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.3 Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and relevance and sufficiency of the evidence and identifying when irrelevant evidence is introduced.

108 COMPARISON/CONTRAST ESSAY In this essay, you are to compare and contrast yourself with a character from Thirteen Reasons Why. Follow the outline below: Paragraph 1- Instruction: State the purpose of your essay. Include the title and author of the book. Paragraph 2: Describe THREE aspects of your personality. Paragraph 3: Describe THREE aspects of your character’s personality. Paragraph 4: Discuss the similarities and differences between you and the character. Paragraph 5 – Conclusion: Summarize main ideas. End with style. For instance, included a rhetorical question or quote. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.4CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

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