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© 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang 13-1 Chapter 13 Intelligent Systems Over.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang 13-1 Chapter 13 Intelligent Systems Over."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang 13-1 Chapter 13 Intelligent Systems Over the Internet Turban, Aronson, and Liang Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, Seventh Edition

2 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang 13-2 Learning Objectives Understand intelligent systems operating across the Internet. Examine the concept of intelligent agents. Learn intelligent agent applications. Explore the concept of Web-based semantic knowledge. Understand recommendation systems. Design recommendation systems.

3 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang 13-3 Spartan Uses Intelligent Systems to Find the Right Person and Reduce Turnover Vignette Supermarket chains experience over 100% turnover –Employee replacement expensive –Front-end positions critical in terms of customer relationships Spartan employed automated hiring system –Analyze applicant profile –Selects candidates from huge applicant pool –Reduced turnover rate to 59% –Increased operational efficiency –Integrated with other systems

4 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang 13-4 Intelligent Systems Programs with tasks automated according to rules and inference mechanisms Web used as delivery platform –May include semantic information Semantic Web Generally perform specific tasks –Information agents –Monitoring agents –Recommendation agents

5 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang 13-5 Intelligent Agents Program that helps user perform routine tasks –Software agents, wizards, demons, bots Degree of independence or autonomy Three functions –Perception of dynamic conditions –Actions that affect environment –Reasoning

6 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang 13-6 Intelligence Levels Wooldridge –Reactivity to changes in environment –Ability to choose response –Capability of interaction with other agents Lee –Level 0 Retrieve documents from URLs specified by user –Level 1 User-initiated search for relevant pages –Level 2 Maintain user profiles Notify users when relevant materials located –Level 3 Learning and deductive reasoning component to assist user in expressing queries

7 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang 13-7 Components Owner –User name, parent process name, or master agent name Author –Development owner, service, or master agent name Account –Anchor to owner’s account Goals and metrics –Determines task’s point of completion and value of results Subject Description –Description of goal’s attributes Creation and Duration –Request and response date Background information Intelligent subsystem –Can provide several of the above characteristics

8 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang 13-8 Agents Can act on own or be empowered Can make some decisions Can decide when to initiate actions Unscripted actions Designed to interact with other agents, programs, or humans Automates repetitive, narrowly defined tasks Continuously running process Must be believable Should be transparent Should work on a variety of machines May be capable of learning

9 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang 13-9 Successful Intelligent Agents Decision support systems Employee empowerment for customer service Automation of routine tasks Search and retrieval of data Expert models Mundane personal activity

10 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang Classifications Organization agents –Task execution for processes or applications Personal agents –Perform tasks for users Private or public agents –Used by single user or many Software or intelligent agents –Ability to learn Franklin and Graesser’s autonomous agents

11 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang Characteristics Agency –Degree of measurable autonomy –Ability to run asynchronously Intelligence –Degree of reasoning and learned behavior Mobility –Degree to which agents move through networks and transmit and receive data Mobile agents –Nonmobile are two dimensional –Mobile are three dimensional

12 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang Web Based Software Agents /Mailbot agents Softbots: –Agents offering assistance with Web browsing –Assistance with frequently asked questions –Search engines –Metasearch engines Network agents –Monitor –Diagnose problems –Security –Resource management

13 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang E-commerce Agents Identify needs Search for product Find best bargain Negotiate price Arrangement of payment Arrange delivery After sales service Advertisement Payment support Fraud detection

14 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang Other Agents Computer interfaces Agents to facilitate learning –Speech agents –Intelligent tutoring Support for activities along supply chain Administrative office management –Workflow, computer-telephone integration Web mining for information Monitoring for alerts Collaboration among agents Mobile commerce using WAP-based services

15 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang DSS Agents Agent types –Data monitoring, data gathering, modeling, domain management, learning preferences –Holsapple and Whinston Map types against –Characteristics »Homeostatic goals, persistence, reactivity –Reference points »Client, task,domain –Hess Map types against –Components »data., modeling, user interface

16 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang Multi-agent Systems Multiple software agents used to perform tasks –Multiple designers –Agents work toward different goals –Can cooperate or compete Distributed artificial intelligence –Single designer –Decomposes tasks into subtasks –Distributed problem solving –Single goal

17 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang Semantic Web Content presentation Organization standard Enables access to Web-based knowledge Allows Web-based collaboration and cooperation Technologies –XML Scripting language employing user defined tags –Web services XML-based technologies comprised of four layers –Transport, XML messaging, service description, publication and integration

18 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang 13-18

19 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang Components of Semantic Web Resource Description Framework data model –Relate Uniform Resource Identifiers to each other Point to Web resources Language with defined semantics Standardized terminologies for knowledge domain –Service logic establishes rules governing use Proof Trust

20 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang Advantages and Limitations Advantages: –Easy to understand –Systems and modules easily integrated –Saves development time and expense Allows for incremental and rapid development –Updates automatically –Resources reuse Limitations: –Oversimplified graphical representation –Needs additional tools –Incorrect definitions –Information may be incorrect or inconsistent –Security

21 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang Recommendation Systems Personalized –Collect and analyze each user’s information and needs Profile generation and maintenance –Profiling method determination –Initial profile generation –Data processing for pattern recognition –Feedback collection –Analyze feedback and adapt Profile exploitation and recommendation –Identify useful information –Compare user profile to new items –Locate similar users, create neighborhood, make prediction

22 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang Recommendation Systems Collaborative filtering –Market segmentation used to predict preferences –Compares individual to population in order to locate similar users Similarity index metrics –Infer interests –Predicts preferences based on weighted sums Content-based filtering –Recommendations-based on similarities between products –Attribute based –Works with small base of data –Neglects aesthetic aspects of products

23 © 2005 Prentice Hall, Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, 7th Edition, Turban, Aronson, and Liang Management Issues Expense Security Systems integration and flexibility Hardware and software requirements Agent accuracy Agent learning Invasion of privacy Competitive intelligence and industrial intelligence Other ethical issues Heightened expectations Systems acceptance


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