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1 The following is a presentation given by the TENRM faculty at The Washington Center for the Improvement of Undergraduate Education Conference on February.

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Presentation on theme: "1 The following is a presentation given by the TENRM faculty at The Washington Center for the Improvement of Undergraduate Education Conference on February."— Presentation transcript:

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2 1 The following is a presentation given by the TENRM faculty at The Washington Center for the Improvement of Undergraduate Education Conference on February 22, Click the left mouse button to move forward through the presentation. Click the right mouse button to reverse. Environmental Education in a Tribal College: An Emergent Learning Community

3 2 Environmental Education in a Tribal College: An Emergent Learning Community Phillip Duran, Ted Williams, Sharon Kinley, Roberto Gonzalez-Plaza, Northwest Indian College, Gigi Berardi, Lynn Robbins, Western Washington University E nvironmental Science Education is a colossal task for at least three reasons: the history of neglect and under-funding of reservation Indian education, the phenomenal changes taking place in "mainstream" science and science education and the outstanding perception that "science" is the only knowledge that describes reality coherently...

4 3 The meltdown of scientific reductionism

5 4 TENRM derives its essence from the personal (tribal) identity of the students, from faculty and the community advocating non-coercion and non-abandonment and from systemic, non- linear "science" learning. We hope to graduate self-reliant, psychologically independent human beings who work for the welfare of their communities.

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7 6 Articulation (H. Nouwen) The person who can articulate the movements of inner life, the person who can name experiences is no longer a victim of the system, psychologically, and no longer a victim of itself

8 7 Coexistence & compassion  Coexistence of science & Indian knowledge (in the sense of orchestrate) (“integrate”)  Coexistence of spirits realized in compassion ( the source of authority)

9 8 What are we doing today ?  First, Phillip Duran will discuss an Indian college theory of being  Second, Gigi Berardi will review the fundamental principles of the program  Thirdly, Ted Williams will discuss the challenges of the program

10 9 The Circle, the Powers “You have noticed that everything an Indian does is in a circle, and that is because the Power of the World always works in circles, and everything tries to be round…” -Black Elk (Oglala Lakota)

11 10 The Sacred Directions East South West North

12 TurtleTurtle Island

13 12 The Seasons of Life Child Adolescent Adult Elder

14 13 Cardinal Virtues ( Lakota ) Bravery Fortitude Compassion Wisdom

15 14 The Times of the Day Sunrise Noon Sunset Night

16 15 Sacred Plants Tobacco Sage Cedar Sweet Grass

17 16 Four Sides of the Human Being Spiritual Emotional Physical Mental

18 17 Human Development Protection Nourishment Growth Wholeness

19 18 Native Science EARTH All Things RelatedEverything Has Spirit Natural Law Preeminent Change is Constant All Matter Vibrating Energy System of Cycles (Earth is our Mother  respect) Renewal

20 19 Western Paradigm EARTH Take more than you need Accumulation for profit Linear patterns of behavior Individualism Conquest / Control Earth a Resource (Earth is a Commodity  control) Consumption Development Preeminence of written law Individualism

21 20 Westward Expansion Indian Land Loss of land base Broken Treaties Depopulation Land transferred to settlers Tribal unity destroyed Native religions outlawed Children severed from parents Subsistence to dependency “Kill the Indian, save the Man”

22 21 Mending the Sacred Hoop identity crisis tuberculosis unemployment poverty housing alcohol mortality invisibility short life expectancy diabetesyouth suicides sacred sites religious freedom hazardous waste sovereignty life patenting broken treaties political conflict education adoptions assimilation Indian values FAS

23 22 Indigenous Education relevantholistic compassionate spiritual ecological communal experiential practical oral “All My Relations”

24 23 Motherhood “[The mother] studies the family life of the birds, so exquisite in its emotional intensity and its patient devotion, until she seems to feel the universal mother-heart beating in her own breast.” -Ohiyesa (Dakota)

25 24 Child’s First Lesson “In due time children take of their own accord the attitude of prayer, and speak reverently of the Powers. They feel that all living creatures are blood brothers and sisters; the storm wind is to them a messenger of the Great Mystery.” -Ohiyesa (Dakota)

26 25 How Science is Changing From “Geology” to “Earth System Science” Earth a Single System (of subsystems) Quantum Theory and Views of Reality From “steady state” to expanding universe “Environmentalism” vs. Traditional Knowledge From“Unrelated” Phenomena to Complex Adaptive Systems Separate Disciplines Merging into Meta Domains of Knowledge

27 26 Educational Paradoxes Non-Linear “Science” using Linear Resources Natives Fear of “Science” but not Nature Experiment vs. Experience vs. Reality Land-based Education in a Temporal Environment Tribal Graduates for a Consumer Society Tribal Identity amidst Mainstream Ideologies

28 27 Returning to the Circle "Upon suffering beyond suffering, the Red Nation shall rise again and it shall be a blessing for a sick world. A world filled with broken promises, selfishness and separations. A World longing for light again. I see a time long after the skies have grown dark and dirty and the water has become bad smelling. I see a time of seven generations when all the colors of mankind will gather under the Sacred Tree of Life and one whole earth will become one circle again." - Chief Crazy Horse

29 and the beginning The End…

30 29 “When people live far from scenes of the Great Spirit’s making, it’s easy for them to forget his laws.” -Tatanga Mani (Stoney) “Only in reference to the earth can [the Indian] persist in his true identity.” -N. Scott Momaday (Kiowa) ~~~

31 30 “There is one God looking down on us all. We are all children of the one God. God is listening to me. The sun, the darkness, the winds, are all listening to what we now say.” -Geronimo (Apache) “If you have one hundred people who live together, and if each one cares for the rest, there is One Mind.” -Shining Arrows (Crow)

32 31 “We do not walk alone. Great Being walks beside us. Know this and be grateful.” -Polingaysi Qöyawayma (Hopi) “We may misunderstand, but we do not misexperience.” -Vine Deloria, Jr. (Yankton Sioux) ~~~~~

33 32 “We believed in one God, the Great Spirit. We believed in our own kind of Ten commandments. And we behaved as though we believed in them.” -Vine Deloria, Jr. (Yankton Sioux) “We are related, we are all one. The Indian acknowledges this and so discovers the most liberating aspect of Native science: life renews, and all things which support life are renewable.” -Dr. Pam Colorado (Oneida)

34 33 Principles and Adaptation of the Tribal Environmental And Natural Resources Management (TENRM) Model for Tribal Colleges

35 34 By Gigi Berardi, Dan Burns, Phil Duran, Roberto Gonzalez-Plaza, Sharon Kinley, Lynn Robbins, Ted Williams, and Wayne Woods TENRM Is a NSF-Funded Project of the Science and Mathematics Division Northwest Indian College 2522 Kwina Road Bellingham, WA NSF Grant No. DUE

36 35 SECTION I. INTRODUCTION

37 36 WELCOME Background to TENRM Profile of TENRM

38 37 SECTION II. FOUNDATIONS OF THE TENRM PROGRAM

39 38 Mission of the Program Goals and Program Features Foundation Principles  Theoretical Assumptions, and Other Guiding Principles

40 39 Foundations of TENRM Program First Principle Integration of Tribal & Western Knowledge – Coarticulation and Coexistence of Knowledge Second Principle Non-Abandonment Policy and Non-Coercion Third Principle Developmental Education

41 40 SECTION III. STRUCTURE OF THE PROGRAM

42 41 Curriculum and Themes  Courses Expected Competencies External Evaluation

43 42 To Be the Eagles’ View Water Land and Land Use Oceans Making Connections, Finding a Balance Bringing It All Together (Project)

44 43 Curriculum and Themes Courses Expected Competencies External Evaluation

45 44 Biology Chemistry Computer Applications Economics English Humanities Mathematics Indian History and Culture Physical Geography or Geology Political Science Speech Spiritual/Cultural Study Statistics

46 45 SECTION IV. LESSONS LEARNED

47 46 Student Assessment Program Leadership Building Community Through Addressing Conflict Retention Best Practices

48 47 SECTION V. ADAPTING THE TENRM MODEL FOR YOUR SITE

49 48 Getting Started Adapting the Model Revisiting the Continuum of Possibilities

50 49 CHALLENGESOf The TENRM learning community Living and teaching the coexistence and paradoxes of Western and Native knowledges Student success and encouragement (AKA Retention) Living as a whole community Program sustainability - life within the larger community

51 50 Living and Teaching in two worlds What is “integration” of parallel systems of knowledge and how is it done in TENRM? How do faculty pay attention? Emergent Design The need for faculty cohesion and understanding of systems of knowledge requires significant time for faculty development and community building Rainbow Lodge!

52 51 How Do we address Educational Paradoxes? Non-Linear “Science” using Linear Resources Natives Fear of “Science” but not Nature Experiment vs. Experience vs. Reality Land-based Education in a Temporal Environment Tribal Graduates for a Consumer Society Tribal Identity amidst Mainstream Ideologies

53 52 The WHOLE STUDENT THE WHOLE COMMUNITY What is “retention”? – the complex lives of Indian students – the Iceberg Model How non-abandonment and non-coercion live in TENRM Implications for faculty and students – maintaining the community under difficult circumstances – conflict, life and death

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55 54 TENRM Within the Larger Community PROGRAM SUSTAINABILITY Fear and lack of understanding of the ecological model of education Neglect and under funding of Indian colleges vs. the cost of cohort education – moving toward sustainability Relating to and growing into the larger college and Native Community

56 55 Our QUESTIONS Integrity and Sustainabilty How do we maintain the essence of the Native learning community as we grow into the larger community? How do we continue to evolve the program maintaining integrity with science, native culture and academic standards?

57 56 Your Questions How do these dilemmas live at your school? What questions and comments do you have? The conversation continues - END of PRESENTATION – - Use your Browser’s BACK button to return -


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