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A Study Of The Apostle Paul’s Letter To The Hebrews Don’t drift away! Don’t neglect your salvation! Don’t Depart! Don’t fall away! Don’t cast away your.

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1 A Study Of The Apostle Paul’s Letter To The Hebrews Don’t drift away! Don’t neglect your salvation! Don’t Depart! Don’t fall away! Don’t cast away your confidence! Don’t harden your heart! How can we neglect so great a salvation? ~ Hebrews 2:3

2 Hebrews: Christ Is Superior! Superior Person (1:1—4:13) Superior to Prophets (1:1-3) Superior to Angels (1:4—2:18) Superior to Moses (3:1-19) Superior to Joshua (4:1-13) Superior Priest (4:14—7:28) Superior to Aaron (4:14—6:12) Superior to Melchizedek (6:13—7:10) Superior to Levi (7:11-28)

3 Hebrews: Christ Is Superior! Superior Pact to Moses’ (8:1—10:18) Superior Promises (8:1-13) Superior Sanctuary (9:1-15) Superior Sacrifice (9:16-28) Superior Results (10:1-18) Superior Principle (Faith) to Moses’ (10:19—13:25) Superior Things (10:19-39) Superior Actions (11:1-40) Superior Relationship (12:1-29) Superior Way of Life (13:1-25) Superior Way of Life (13:1-25) Today we’ll consider verses 1-8.

4 After presenting numerous examples of faith in, and after presenting many encouragements of faith in, Paul concluded in by presenting some evidences of faith, evi- dences that God expected to exist in their lives if they were really walking by faith and not by sight. After presenting numerous examples of faith in chapter 11, and after presenting many encouragements of faith in chap- ter 12, Paul concluded in chapter 13 by presenting some evidences of faith, evi- dences that God expected to exist in their lives if they were really walking by faith and not by sight. Another way to look at is that ( as mentioned in our introduction to )…    Another way to look at chapter 13 is that ( as mentioned in our introduction to Hebrews )…   

5 After Paul demonstrated in that The Faith-Principle of Christ Estab- lishes a Better Relationship with God than what was possible through Moses, he concluded in by demon- strating that The Faith-Principle of Christ Is Also the Basis for a Superior Way of Life than what was possible under Moses. After Paul demonstrated in chapter 12 that The Faith-Principle of Christ Estab- lishes a Better Relationship with God than what was possible through Moses, he concluded in chapter 13 by demon- strating that The Faith-Principle of Christ Is Also the Basis for a Superior Way of Life than what was possible under Moses.

6 Let brotherly love continue. Hebrews 13:1 

7 Let brotherly love continue. The original term is philadelphia, from philia referring to fondness and adel- phia referring to siblings, literally those from the same womb; it’s trans- lated as in. So by this Paul was indicating at least two things… The original term is philadelphia, from philia referring to fondness and adel- phia referring to siblings, literally those from the same womb; it’s trans- lated as brotherly kindness in Second Peter 1:7. So by this Paul was indicating at least two things…

8 Let brotherly love continue. They were expect- ed to act as sib- lings would act. And…    1. They were expect- ed to act as sib- lings would act. And…   

9 Let brotherly love continue. They were breth- ren, people with the same parent; in this case, of course, that par- ent was God, im- plying that it was love among Chris- tians, not non- Christians, that Paul had in mind. 2. They were breth- ren, people with the same parent; in this case, of course, that par- ent was God, im- plying that it was love among Chris- tians, not non- Christians, that Paul had in mind. You know… You know…

10 Even though siblings may fight, just let a non-sibling come between them, and watch what happens—one sibling will protect the other! In fact… This is the very reason I believe Paul used philia instead of agape here; i.e., he wasn’t referring so much to how they treated each other as much as to how they protected each other from outsid- ers ( e.g. the Jews [and soon the Romans as well] who wanted to destroy Christianity, cf. ). This is the very reason I believe Paul used philia instead of agape here; i.e., he wasn’t referring so much to how they treated each other as much as to how they protected each other from outsid- ers ( e.g. the Jews [and soon the Romans as well] who wanted to destroy Christianity, cf. 12:12-17).

11 Let brotherly love continue. The original term here means to sur- vive and is translat- ed as in. The original term here means to sur- vive and is translat- ed as endure in First Peter 1:25. Speaking of love and endurance…

12 Since Jesus prophesied of these dark days that (), Paul, as he concluded his letter, commanded them to work on keeping this fire alive. Since Jesus prophesied of these dark days that the love of many will grow cold, but he who endures to the end shall be saved ( Mat. 24:12b-13 ), Paul, as he concluded his letter, commanded them to work on keeping this fire alive. Paul later spoke of this to Timothy in, what we believe to be, his last letter penned in the mid 60’s. Notice that the only love some folks would have would be love for themselves:   

13 In the last days men will be unloving So… In the last days perilous times will come: for men will be lovers of themselves, lovers of money, boasters, proud, blas- phemers, disobedient to parents, un- thankful, unholy, unloving, unforgiving, slanderers, without self-control, brutal, despisers of good, traitors, headstrong, haughty, [ and ] lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God ( 2 Tim. 3:1-4 ). So… While they would love themselves, they wouldn’t love others or even God.

14 Do not forget to entertain strang- ers, for by doing so some have un- wittingly enter- tained angels. Hebrews 13:2 

15 Do not forget to entertain strang- ers, for by doing so some have un- wittingly enter- tained angels. Now, moving from love for those fami- liar to them, Paul went on to include an admonition to show concern for those unfamiliar to them, viz. Christian brethren from other places. ( and are about Christians.) Now, moving from love for those fami- liar to them, Paul went on to include an admonition to show concern for those unfamiliar to them, viz. Christian brethren from other places. (Verses 1 and 3 are about Christians.)

16 In Paul wrote,. In Galatians 6:10 Paul wrote, As we have opportunity, let us do good to all, especially those … of the household of faith. In James wrote, And… In James 2:15-17 James wrote, If a brother or sister is … destitute … [and] you do not give them … the things that are needed for the body, what does it profit? And… In Jesus said…   In Matthew 25:34-40 Jesus said…  

17 brethren Then the King will say to those on His right hand, “Come … inherit the kingdom pre- pared for you from the foundation of the world: for I was hungry, and you gave Me food; I was thirsty, and you gave me drink; I was a stranger, and you took Me in; I was naked, and you clothed Me; I was sick, and you visited Me; I was in pri- son, and you came to Me.” Then the right- eous will [ask Him, “When did we do these things?”] And the King will answer, “… inasmuch as you did it to one of the least of these my brethren, you did it to Me.”

18 So I believe that Paul’s main point to these Hebrews concerned outpost brethren; i.e., in their time there were many itinerant preachers who needed places to stay ( cf. ), not to mention brethren who had been driven from their homes ( as we talked about when we considered ). Besides that, as indicates, Jerusalem was a great trade city, so many Chris- tians were likely traveling through. So I believe that Paul’s main point to these Hebrews concerned outpost brethren; i.e., in their time there were many itinerant preachers who needed places to stay ( cf. 3 John 5-8 ), not to mention brethren who had been driven from their homes ( as we talked about when we considered 10:33 ). Besides that, as Revelation 18 indicates, Jerusalem was a great trade city, so many Chris- tians were likely traveling through.

19 Do not forget to entertain strang- ers, for by doing so some have un- wittingly enter- tained angels. It’s very likely that Paul was thinking of & when Abe and Lot entertained angels without realizing it, at least at first. It’s very likely that Paul was thinking of Genesis 18 & 19 when Abe and Lot entertained angels without realizing it, at least at first.

20 During the time these Hebrews lived— the time when supernatural occur- rences were coming to an end yet still in existence ( cf. & ), there may very well have been a chance for those brethren to encounter angels unknowingly; after all, as we noticed when studying, angels had a closer relationship to them than they do to us today. So, NO, …    During the time these Hebrews lived— the time when supernatural occur- rences were coming to an end yet still in existence ( cf. 1 Cor. 13:8-13 & Eph. 4:7- 13 ), there may very well have been a chance for those brethren to encounter angels unknowingly; after all, as we noticed when studying 1:14, angels had a closer relationship to them than they do to us today. So, NO, …   

21 Even if those brethren could’ve literally entertained angels as Abe and Lot did, I don’t believe we ever do that today; although, however, we may obtain blessings from our visitors just as Abe and Lot did from theirs, which was pro- bably Paul’s main point. Incidentally… Although I believe this principle of hos- pitality applies today, I also believe the principle of applies today: ; i.e., we must use good judgment. Although I believe this principle of hos- pitality applies today, I also believe the principle of Matthew 7:6 applies today: Do not … cast your pearls before swine … lest they turn and tear you in pieces ; i.e., we must use good judgment.

22 Remember the prisoners as if chained with them and those who are mistreated, since you yourselves are in [the] body also. Hebrews 13:3 

23 Remember the prisoners as if chained with them and those who are mistreated, since you yourselves are in [the] body also. Common sense alone tells us that this command included more than just thinking about tor- mented and impris- oned Christians from time to time; i.e., it obviously in- cluded praying for them, as well as visiting them and taking things such as food and clothing to them if possible. This idea here is much like in where the term means more than just checking on someone. This idea here is much like in James 1:27 where the term visit means more than just checking on someone.

24 Remember the prisoners as if chained with them and those who are mistreated, since you yourselves are in [the] body also. By penning these two phrases, Paul was reminding them of their Savior’s teaching to treat others the way they would want to be treated if they were in their shoes ( ), in which, es- pecially at this time, they could very well have found them- selves! By penning these two phrases, Paul was reminding them of their Savior’s teaching to treat others the way they would want to be treated if they were in their shoes ( Mat. 7:12 ), in which, es- pecially at this time, they could very well have found them- selves! By the way… By the way…

25 Remember the prisoners as if chained with them and those who are mistreated, since you yourselves are in [the] body also. I placed brackets around the definite article here be- cause it isn’t in the original, meaning that Paul wasn’t referring to the church body, but to the physical body. I placed brackets around the definite article the here be- cause it isn’t in the original, meaning that Paul wasn’t referring to the church body, but to the physical body.

26 Remember the prisoners as if chained with them and those who are mistreated, since you yourselves are in [the] body also. One reason I believe Paul had Christians in mind in this verse is because he said ; be- sides, the immediate context ( as well as the entire context of Hebrews ) suggests that Paul was writ- ing about the en- couragement of per- secuted Christians. One reason I believe Paul had Christians in mind in this verse is because he said the prisoners; be- sides, the immediate context ( as well as the entire context of Hebrews ) suggests that Paul was writ- ing about the en- couragement of per- secuted Christians.

27 Marriage is honor- able among all and the bed undefiled; but fornicators and adulterers God will judge (condemn). Hebrews 13:4 

28 Although before studying this verse I believed it was sim- ply a declarative statement, I now believe it’s an im- perative statement; i.e., I believe that the first part of this verse should read,. Why? Although before studying this verse I believed it was sim- ply a declarative statement, I now believe it’s an im- perative statement; i.e., I believe that the first part of this verse should read, Let marriage be honorable among all, and let the bed be undefiled. Why? Well… Well… Marriage is honor- able among all and the bed undefiled; but fornicators and adulterers God will judge.

29 Interlinears and most versions render it as a command. 1. Interlinears and most versions render it as a command. This corresponds to the flow of the entire chapter that’s full of exhorta- tions to do this or that. 2. This corresponds to the flow of the entire chapter that’s full of exhorta- tions to do this or that.

30 Every verse immediately surrounding this one indicates that it was also meant to be in the form of a com- mand: (), (), (), and (). And… 3. Every verse immediately surrounding this one indicates that it was also meant to be in the form of a com- mand: Let brotherly love continue ( v. 1 ), Don’t forget to entertain ( v. 2 ), Remember the prisoners ( v. 3 ), and Let your conduct be without covet- ousness ( v. 5 ). And… Before the word, Nestle’s text has the Greek word gar which means for or because; i.e., let the marriage bed be undefiled because God will punish fornicators. 4. Before the word fornicators, Nestle’s text has the Greek word gar which means for or because; i.e., let the marriage bed be undefiled because God will punish fornicators.

31 It has been suggest- ed that this clause was penned by Paul to counteract the mistaken belief by some ( e.g. Origen and the Essenes ) that celi- bacy was more hon- orable or holier than marriage; after all, Paul did tell Timothy that some people would come along and forbid marriage: Marriage is honor- able among all and the bed undefiled; but fornicators and adulterers God will judge.

32 In another last days passage from Paul to Timothy, he wrote that in the latter times some will depart from the faith ( cf. ) forbidding to marry (). In another last days passage from Paul to Timothy, he wrote that The Spirit ex- pressly says that in the latter times some will depart from the faith, giving heed to deceiving spirits and doctrines of demons ( cf. Heb. 13:9a ), speaking lies in hypocrisy, having their own consci- ence seared with a hot iron, forbidding to marry, and commanding to abstain from foods which God created to be received… ( 1 Tim. 4:1-3a ).

33 What’s the differ- ence between these two? Well, adultery is to commit any sexual act against a biblical marriage. Marriage is honor- able among all and the bed undefiled; but fornicators and adulterers God will judge.

34 Fornication is to commit any unlaw- ful sexual act period. So fornication is adultery, incest, homosexuality, pre- marital sex, besti- ality, etc., which is why the NKJV usu- ally translates the original term here as (cf. ). Fornication is to commit any unlaw- ful sexual act period. So fornication is adultery, incest, homosexuality, pre- marital sex, besti- ality, etc., which is why the NKJV usu- ally translates the original term here as the sexually im- moral (cf. 1 Cor. 5:10). Marriage is honor- able among all and the bed undefiled; but fornicators and adulterers God will judge.

35 Let your conduct be without covet- ousness, and be content with such things as you have. Hebrews 13:5a 

36 Let your conduct be without covet- ousness, and be content with such things as you have. Although this word literally referred to the love of money ( as in ), the word came to refer to a yearning for better circum- stances in general, which is obviously what Paul had in mind here for the following reasons:  Although this word literally referred to the love of money ( as in 1 Tim. 6:10 ), the word came to refer to a yearning for better circum- stances in general, which is obviously what Paul had in mind here for the following reasons: 

37 Let your conduct be without covet- ousness, and be content with such things as you have. The word re- fers to that which presently sur- rounds someone, i.e. his current situation, which is reminiscent of where Paul wrote,. 1. The word have re- fers to that which presently sur- rounds someone, i.e. his current situation, which is reminiscent of Philippians 4:11 where Paul wrote, I have learned to be content in whatever circum- stances I find my- self.

38 In the immediate context Paul wrote of God helping them and never leav- ing them () as well as the fact that they could find themselves mis- treated and in prison (). And… 2. In the immediate context Paul wrote of God helping them and never leav- ing them ( vv. 5b-6 ) as well as the fact that they could find themselves mis- treated and in prison ( v. 3 ). And… In the remote context—the entire letter, Paul had been encouraging them to press onward through what- ever negative circumstances they found themselves in for Christ’s sake. 3. In the remote context—the entire letter, Paul had been encouraging them to press onward through what- ever negative circumstances they found themselves in for Christ’s sake. So…    So…   

39 Let your conduct be without covet- ousness, and be content with such things as you have. Since this simply means to live your lives, then Paul was in essence telling them to live your lives without yearn- ing for better physi- cal lives under Mos- es ( at least what was left of it ), because that would result in forfeiting better, spiritual, eternal lives under Christ with God. Now… 

40 Why did Paul feel it necessary to give them this exhortation? Because the indication back in was that some of these brethren had lost much for Christ; so Paul was probably en- couraging them here to not use up their time and energies trying to get back what they once had, especially at this point in time when things would likely only get worse. So we could para- phrase it like this:. Why did Paul feel it necessary to give them this exhortation? Because the indication back in 10:33-34 was that some of these brethren had lost much for Christ; so Paul was probably en- couraging them here to not use up their time and energies trying to get back what they once had, especially at this point in time when things would likely only get worse. So we could para- phrase it like this: Just be content, placing your lives in the hands of God.

41 For He Himself has said, “I will never leave you nor for- sake you” ( ). So we may boldly say, “The Lord is my Helper; I will not fear! What can man do to me” ()? For He Himself has said, “I will never leave you nor for- sake you” ( Deu. 31: 5-8 ). So we may boldly say, “The Lord is my Helper; I will not fear! What can man do to me” ( Ps. 118:6 )? Hebrews 13:5b-6

42 For He Himself has said, “I will never leave you nor for- sake you” ( ). So we may boldly say, “The Lord is my Helper; I will not fear! What can man do to me” ()? For He Himself has said, “I will never leave you nor for- sake you” ( Deu. 31: 5-8 ). So we may boldly say, “The Lord is my Helper; I will not fear! What can man do to me” ( Ps. 118:6 )? Let me begin here by saying that in Eng- lish a double nega- tive equals a posi- tive; e.g., to say “He hasn’t eaten nothing ” actually means that he has eaten some- thing. However, in Greek the opposite is the case; i.e., the more negatives, the greater the empha- sis. Now…   

43 For He Himself has said, “I will never leave you nor for- sake you” ( ). So we may boldly say, “The Lord is my Helper; I will not fear! What can man do to me” ()? For He Himself has said, “I will never leave you nor for- sake you” ( Deu. 31: 5-8 ). So we may boldly say, “The Lord is my Helper; I will not fear! What can man do to me” ( Ps. 118:6 )? In our translation of, there’s only one negative—, but in the original there are two negatives be- fore the word and three negatives before the word. So what’s the significance? Well…    In our translation of verse 5b, there’s only one negative— never, but in the original there are two negatives be- fore the word leave and three negatives before the word forsake. So what’s the significance? Well…   

44 For He Himself has said, “I will never leave you nor for- sake you” ( ). So we may boldly say, “The Lord is my Helper; I will not fear! What can man do to me” ()? For He Himself has said, “I will never leave you nor for- sake you” ( Deu. 31: 5-8 ). So we may boldly say, “The Lord is my Helper; I will not fear! What can man do to me” ( Ps. 118:6 )? A more literal trans- lation would have God promising — with strong emphasis— something along these lines: By the way…  A more literal trans- lation would have God promising — with strong emphasis— something along these lines: I will never, never leave you! I will never, never, never forsake you! By the way… 

45 For He Himself has said, “I will never leave you nor for- sake you” ( ). So we may boldly say, “The Lord is my Helper; I will not fear! What can man do to me” ()? For He Himself has said, “I will never leave you nor for- sake you” ( Deu. 31: 5-8 ). So we may boldly say, “The Lord is my Helper; I will not fear! What can man do to me” ( Ps. 118:6 )? The word is very strong in the original, referring to leaving someone totally helpless or in dire straits. The word forsake is very strong in the original, referring to leaving someone totally helpless or in dire straits.

46 For He Himself has said, “I will never leave you nor for- sake you” ( ). So we may boldly say, “The Lord is my Helper; I will not fear! What can man do to me” ()? For He Himself has said, “I will never leave you nor for- sake you” ( Deu. 31: 5-8 ). So we may boldly say, “The Lord is my Helper; I will not fear! What can man do to me” ( Ps. 118:6 )? The word re- fers to courage; i.e., Paul was saying, with courage. So…  The word boldly re- fers to courage; i.e., Paul was saying, So we—with courage— may say…. So… 

47 The whole point here is that, as long as they trusted in God, they needed no one and nothing else; i.e., covetousness ( which implies worry & anxiety ) for better earthly/physical circumstances was detrimental and wholly unnecessary! Paul’s attitude was, (). The whole point here is that, as long as they trusted in God, they needed no one and nothing else; i.e., covetousness ( which implies worry & anxiety ) for better earthly/physical circumstances was detrimental and wholly unnecessary! Paul’s attitude was, as having nothing, yet possessing all things ( 2 Cor. 6:10 ). And…   

48 We might add to this the comforting promise of : (or to those who are faithful). We might add to this the comforting promise of Romans 8:28: All things work together for good to those who love God (or to those who are faithful). Jesus said to His apostles, (). And… Jesus said to His apostles, I am with you always, even to the end of the age ( Mat. 28:20 ). And… I love the exclamation of : I love the exclamation of Isaiah 12:2: God is my salvation! [So] I will trust [in Him] and not be afraid!

49 What a wonderful way for Paul to begin closing his thoughts to these weary brethren! No matter what happened to them, the Lord would never, never leave them! They could leave Him ( which is why this book was penned ), but He would never, never, never forsake them!

50 Remember those who rule over you, who have spoken the Word of God to you, whose faith follow, consider- ing the outcome of their conduct. Hebrews 13:7 

51 Remember those who rule over you, who have spoken the Word of God to you, whose faith follow, consider- ing the outcome of their conduct. The original term here is slightly dif- ferent than the one in. They are synonyms, but be- cause this word is more closely relat- ed to the words for mention and mem- orial, …    The original term here is slightly dif- ferent than the one in verse 3. They are synonyms, but be- cause this word is more closely relat- ed to the words for mention and mem- orial, …   

52 Remember those who rule over you, who have spoken the Word of God to you, whose faith follow, consider- ing the outcome of their conduct. …it’s believed that Paul used this one instead of the other one again because here he was refer- ring to thosewho were dead, perhaps martyred. And this is probably correct for the following reasons:    …it’s believed that Paul used this one instead of the other one again because here he was refer- ring to those who were dead, perhaps martyred. And this is probably correct for the following reasons:   

53 The phrase may be sim- ply translated or, eli- minating the idea of present rule ( cf. other versions & notes on ). Besides… 1. The phrase those who rule may be sim- ply translated teachers or leaders, eli- minating the idea of present rule ( cf. other versions & notes on 2:10 ). Besides… The next phrase,, is in the past tense, more liter- ally reading. 2. The next phrase, who have spoken … to you, is in the past tense, more liter- ally reading who spoke to you. The clause indicates that they were dead. And… 3. The clause considering the outcome of their conduct indicates that they were dead. And…, being in the present tense, discusses living, ruling leaders. So… 4. Verse 17, being in the present tense, discusses living, ruling leaders. So… Paul charged them to do three things in regard to these leaders:   

54 Remember those who rule over you, who have spoken the Word of God to you, whose faith follow, consider- ing the outcome of their conduct. Memorialize or honor them. 1. Memorialize or honor them.

55 No, he wasn’t telling them to worship them in the sense of sainting them and putting them up as idols, but ( as he said to the Thessalonians ) he was them to [,NIV] (, NASB ). (How often does that occur today, especially in our proud country?) No, he wasn’t telling them to worship them in the sense of sainting them and putting them up as idols, but ( as he said to the Thessalonians ) he was urging them to appreciate [respect, NIV] those who diligently labor among you and … give you instruction … esteem them very highly in love because of their work ( 1 The. 5:12-13, NASB ). (How often does that occur today, especially in our proud country?)

56 Remember those who rule over you, who have spoken the Word of God to you, whose faith follow, consider- ing the outcome of their conduct. Imitate them. 2. Imitate them. (We get our English word “mimic” from this Greek term.)

57 Remember those who rule over you, who have spoken the Word of God to you, whose faith follow, consider- ing the outcome of their conduct. Ponder the result of their lives. 3. Ponder the result of their lives. And what was that? Jesus never, never, never forsook them ( cf. ); so, as says,. And what was that? Jesus never, never, never forsook them ( cf. 2 Tim. 4:16-17 ); so, as Revelation 14:13 says, Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord … [be- cause] they rest from their labors, & their labors follow them.

58 Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever. Hebrews 13:8 

59 Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever. Paul began this let- ter by quoting God as saying to His Son, (), then here he ended it with the same senti- ment. So what’s the point here? Well…  Paul began this let- ter by quoting God as saying to His Son, You are the same, and Your years will not fail ( 1:12 ), then here he ended it with the same senti- ment. So what’s the point here? Well… 

60 Keeping both the immediate and re- mote contexts in mind, it seems very clear to me that Paul was telling them that just as the Lord has always been with the faithful in the past, so He would be with these brethren in their time and all others from that time on.

61 Putting ourselves in the shoes of these first century brethren, Paul was saying to them that yesterday (); today (); forever- more (). So…    Putting ourselves in the shoes of these first century brethren, Paul was saying to them that as a sacrificial high priest, Jesus … yesterday … offered Himself for your sin ( 9:23-28 ); likewise, as a sympathetic high priest, Jesus … today … represents you at the throne of God ( 4:14-16 ); besides that, He’ll continue to do this for all His people … forever- more ( 7:23-28 ). So…   

62 God and Jesus are faithful to the faith- ful, and because of that, Paul went on in to talk to them about how they could remain faithful. But that’s for our next installment. God and Jesus are faithful to the faith- ful, and because of that, Paul went on in verses 9-17 to talk to them about how they could remain faithful. But that’s for our next installment.


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