Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Let’s have a parti (ciple )!!! Using –ing and –ed adjectives to increase verbal repertoire (participial adjectives) ESL English Learner Wednesdays/Fridays.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Let’s have a parti (ciple )!!! Using –ing and –ed adjectives to increase verbal repertoire (participial adjectives) ESL English Learner Wednesdays/Fridays."— Presentation transcript:

1 Let’s have a parti (ciple )!!! Using –ing and –ed adjectives to increase verbal repertoire (participial adjectives) ESL English Learner Wednesdays/Fridays Workshop #2 scared embarrassing flustered amazing flushed draining ashamed interesting thrilled embarrassed thrilling frightened overwhelming

2 I AM SO CONFUSING!!!!! Have you heard/said this before?

3 I AM SO CONFUSED!!!!! Here is what should be said.

4 THAT IS SO CONFUSING!!!!! Or, this is correct, too.

5 Why are these answers correct?

6 Here is why…

7 Let’s look at our statement... “I am so confused”

8 Now, let’s view it differently-- In simple present, we would say “This confuses me,” “You confuse me,” “He confuses me,” “She confuses me” or “They confuse me”

9 Therefore, when looking at the “-ed” adjective…. Remember that “-ed” describes how you feel at that time… Since only living creatures have feelings, the description of how you feel needs an “-ed” adjective.

10 It describes how you feel because of something that someone (or something) did to you.

11 I AM SO CONFUSED!!!!! An adjective ending in –ed receives or feels an action.

12 I AM SO CONFUSED!!!!! An action happens to you, causing the feeling…

13 This confuses me, so I am confused. In other words, this is what you mean.

14 so... Why is it “–ed”?

15 Answer: You cannot have a result without a cause first.

16 Therefore, the feeling you or others have HAS to look like past tense even if it is an adjective.

17 so... Can a stick or a rock feel “worried?”

18 Answer: Sticks and rocks cannot feel worried or any other “–ed” adjective. Only living creatures can feel.

19 When looking at the “-ing” adjective…. Remember that “-ing” describes how someone or something else appears to be doing at that time… Since he, she, or it is the noun…the description needs an adjective

20 This has the same appearance as present continuous verbs: Therefore, as present continuous has a form of “be” before it, as in: This is confusing me. or You are confusing me.

21 …We can then say “You are (or This is, She is, He is, etc.) confusing me, so you are confusing.” In other words, because you are actively confusing me as we speak, what you are (to me or others) is a confusing person.

22 THAT IS SO CONFUSING!!!!! The person or thing creates or causes the feeling.

23 This confuses me, so it is confusing to me. In other words, this is what you mean.

24 THIS IS CONFUSING!! The adjective here follows the word “is”, which looks like a verb.

25 THIS IS CONFUSING!! This is called a “stative verb” and describes a “state of being.”

26 THIS IS CONFUSING!! Stative verbs (like “is”) are unique in that they get an adjective.

27 THIS IS CONFUSING!! There is no activity involved. They are passive by nature.

28 Some common stative verbs before –ed or –ing adjectives are: is, are, am (all forms of be) feel appear seem look sound

29 Here is a good way to check: If it’s a feeling that is received, check it with “by + noun” at the end… I am confused by you. Since you can say this, saying “I am confused,” is correct.

30 If it’s a feeling that someone or something causes, check it with “to + noun” at the end… This is confusing to him. Since you can say this, saying “This is confusing,” is correct.

31 As a result, if you tell someone, “I am so confusing!”, you actually mean that YOU confuse people!!! If that is true, THEY would be confused by YOU. (Chances are that this is not what you mean at all)

32 Am I confusing to any of you, yet? Are you at all confused by me? Questions for this part?

33 In groups, or individually, please try to make 3-5 good sentences using -ing and –ed adjectives from the word list. You will have the option of sharing some of your best, if there is time.

34 Alarming Aggravating Amusing Annoying Astonishing Astounding Boring Captivating Challenging Charming Comforting Confusing Convincing Depressing Disappointing Discouraging Disgusting Distressing Disturbing Embarrassing Encouraging Entertaining Exciting Frightening Frustrating Fulfilling Gratifying Inspiring Insulting Interesting Moving Overwhelming Perplexing Pleasing Relaxing Relieving Satisfying Shocking Sickening Soothing Surprising Tempting Terrifying Threatening Thrilling Tiring Touching Troubling Unsettling Worrying

35 Alarmed Aggravated Amused Annoyed Astonished Astounded Bored Captivated Challenged Charmed Comforted Confused Convinced Depressed Disappointed Discouraged Disgusted Distressed Disturbed Embarrassed Encouraged Entertained Excited Frightened Frustrated Fulfilled Gratified Inspired Insulted Interested Moved Overwhelmed Perplexed Pleased Relaxed Relieved Satisfied Shocked Sickened Soothed Surprised Tempted Terrified Threatened Thrilled Tired Touched Troubled Unsettled Worried

36 Looking at Enrique’s Journey

37 Now, let’s practice with a fun and interactive lesson:


Download ppt "Let’s have a parti (ciple )!!! Using –ing and –ed adjectives to increase verbal repertoire (participial adjectives) ESL English Learner Wednesdays/Fridays."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google