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Citizens educating themselves: D’Elia, L. (2009). Citizens educating themselves: The case of Argentina in the post-economic collapse. In Ali A. Abdi &

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Presentation on theme: "Citizens educating themselves: D’Elia, L. (2009). Citizens educating themselves: The case of Argentina in the post-economic collapse. In Ali A. Abdi &"— Presentation transcript:

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2 Citizens educating themselves: D’Elia, L. (2009). Citizens educating themselves: The case of Argentina in the post-economic collapse. In Ali A. Abdi & Dip Kapoor (Eds.), Global Perspectives on Adult Education (pp. 207-220). NY: Palgrave-Macmillan. The case of Argentina in the post-economic collapse

3 Acknowledgement Thanks to the Global Education Network - Dr Lynette Shultz & Dr Ali Abdi My work and publications on Argentina’s educational initiatives have been possible thanks to the encouragement and “persistence” of Dr Ali Abdi.

4 . A review of the literature reaffirmed that research and visions related to Adult Basic Learning and Education in the South are dominated by the North, by international agencies and by English-speaking reviewers, often ignoring or dismissing research produced in the South, especially if it is written in languages other than English. (Torres, 2004)

5 plan Post-Military post-collapse conditions leading to formation of Argentinean “crisis” new movement autonomous ways of adult and collective education to resist dependency Recent events

6 NO CONFIDENCE IN THE OLD SYSTEM Argentina, the “grain supplier of the world” after WWII and once considered the most stable social systems In 2001, its government defaulted on $US100 billion debt, the largest sovereign debt default in history (Feldstein, 2002) The currency and the banking system collapsed Argentinean government sequestered all the savings of the middle and poor class wiped out almost completely its middle class

7 “With all of their institutions in crisis, hundreds of thousands of Argentineans went back to democracy's first principles” (Klein, 2003). –popular assemblies* –trading clubs (barter), –comm.health clinics –community kitchens –take over of ~200 abandoned factories

8 autonomous & independent of any organized socio-political structure... “piqueteros”, food rioting groupings, factory workers, or massive neighbourhood assemblies, radically opposed past and current socio-political experiments (Armelino, 2002; Klein, 2003; Lodola, 2003) developed unprecedented relations with social agency & powers in the world (D’Elia, 2005) resisted assimilation by government, political parties, established social and labor movements, and even NGOs.

9 teaching & learning inventions Two observations from contemporary adult education : REPRODUCTIVE EDUCATION CAPITALISM PROFITING FROM EDUCATION Bourgeois class has “the power to profit from educational knowledge...” (Murphy, 1988) However, the autonomous movement in Argentina appears to escape both

10 Pair up! Why do you think corporations could not profit from the education of the Argentineans organized in the new autonomous movement?

11 power to profit from education proportional to Assimilation into institutional, labour and political structures Incorporation into production machinery

12 However, –Many asambleistas were not entering the labour force but established their own micro-enterprises –Some piquetero groups working on the state-plan program, (no dependency on private capitalists) (Auyero, 2001) –Many factory take overs >> running as cooperatives (no capitalistic approach) (Klein, 2003).

13 Uncompromised informal education Popular educators group –Área de Educación Popular del Movimiento Barrios de Pie –Neighborhoods Standing Up literacy and post-literacy elementary and high school completion workshops history and political education Workshops on trade work, popular assemblies’ participatory techniques; travelling workshops on “Free Trade of the Americas”, Foreign Debt, among others (Movimiento Barrios de Pie, 2005).

14 LITERACY PROGRAMS Non formal education – Paulo Freire’s methodology Argentinean popular education: conscious raising – action committed free access bottom-top approach communal, non-governmental (D’Elia, 2005; Barrios de Pie, 2002)

15 “Yo Si Puedo” a literacy audiovisual program for adults provided to the Argentinean Barrios de Pie –stemming from “Instituto de Pedagogos de Latinoamérica y el Caribe” and the UMMEP(Un Mundo Mejor es Posible ) EDUCATION by some NGOs Caritas, and others Green Peace & other internat. organizations

16 recent information Neighborhood Assembly in Gualeguaychu city Buenos Aires Took over a huge environmental challenge by self-educating, researching, and taking communal activism against the building of one of the biggest pulp mill in the world: “Botnia”, on the Uruguay River banks

17 Issues of power symmetry

18 European Union-LA Summit http://www.noalaspapeleras.com.ar/noalaspapeleras.asp

19 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=08ysmal2_CY&eurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.noalaspapeleras.com.ar%2Fvideos.asp&feature=player_embedded Michael Hardt said that what makes the imperial hegemony vulnerable is not the anti-imperialism but the self-management by autonomous groups like the ones in Argentina, Mexico (Chiapas), Brazil (landless movement), and others. To me, the collective education of the new autonomous movement, at least, is self-sustaining its own survival by rebelling against the rules of the market that have profited from and deceived an entire generation in Argentina Thank you

20 Notes in: www.education.ualberta.ca/staff/ldelia


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