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COOKING NUTRIENT DENSE FOOD KOANGA INSTITUTE WORKSHOP TOUR 2014.

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Presentation on theme: "COOKING NUTRIENT DENSE FOOD KOANGA INSTITUTE WORKSHOP TOUR 2014."— Presentation transcript:

1 COOKING NUTRIENT DENSE FOOD KOANGA INSTITUTE WORKSHOP TOUR 2014

2 HUMAN HEALTH ▪ What is Nutrient dense food? Why do we need it? ▪ What methods for preparing, cooking and storing food have we forgotten? ▪ How can we bring back these traditions? ▪ …and the knowledge and health that comes with them?

3 OBJECTIVES I want you to walk out of here with: ▪ A basic understanding food preparation, enough to take the first steps ▪ “Ferments”, “broths” and “activated almonds” demystified ▪ More understanding of the importance of principles that our ancestors ate by ▪ Increased confidence in cooking and preparing these foods ▪ Ideas of how you can apply what I am teaching into your everyday life

4 FUNDAMENTALS ▪ This stuff is easy, and simple, our ancestors did it for centuries with what was available to them, without any fancy gizmos or degrees ▪ There are some foods that do require appropriate preparation for them to nourish us, our ancestors knew this…..we just lost the memo. ▪ If “all disease begins in the gut." (Hippocrates), so does your health ▪ While our health seems out of control, returning to simple principles can help us reclaim it.

5 WESTON A PRICE Research Dentist 1920’s-1930’s Travelled to isolated people across the world, observing people living and eating traditionally before and as “foods of civilisation” had an impact Book- Nutrition and Physical Degeneration

6 SOIL HEALTH = HUMAN HEALTH Rapid loss of top soil due to modern agricultural techniques Globally soils are more and more demineralised due to agricultural and gardening techniques In our past, some areas were deficient in certain minerals, people knew to trade with others for specific minerals Now we are eating from a “global plate” disconnected from our seasons, and soils, and still many people eating a “healthy diet” are malnourished, in that their bodies are not getting the minerals and vitamins they need for development. Single nutrient deficiencies contribute to physical, mental, emotional, behavioural disorders and addictions

7 CHARACTERISTICS OF TRADITIONAL DIETS ▪ No Refined or Denatured foods ▪ Refined sugar ▪ White flour ▪ Canned foods ▪ Pasteurised foods ▪ Homogenised, skim or low fat milk ▪ Refined or hydrogenated oils ▪ Artificial vitamins ▪ Additives or Colourings

8 CHARACTERISTICS OF TRADITIONAL DIETS ▪ Some sort of Animal Protein and Fat ▪ Fish ▪ Seafood ▪ Water and Land fowl ▪ Land animals ▪ Eggs ▪ Milk and milk products ▪ Reptiles ▪ Insects

9 CHARACTERISTICS OF TRADITIONAL DIETS ▪ Four times the Calcium and other minerals of average American diet 1920s ▪ Ten times the fat soluble vitamins as the average American Diet 1920s ▪ Vitamin A ▪ Vitamin D ▪ Vitamin K2 ▪ Total Fat content of traditional diets varied from 30% - 80% ▪ Approx. 4% of energy from polyunsaturated fats ▪ Most energy from fat was saturated and monounsaturated form

10 CHARACTERISTICS OF TRADITIONAL DIETS ▪ In all traditional cultures, some animal products were eaten RAW. ▪ High-enzyme content foods ▪ Raw dairy ▪ Raw meat and fish ▪ Raw honey ▪ Tropical fruits ▪ Cold pressed oils ▪ Unpasteurised wines and beer ▪ Naturally preserved lacto fermented vegetables, fruits, drinks, meats and condiments.

11 CHARACTERISTICS OF TRADITIONAL DIETS ▪ Seeds, Grains and Nuts were soaked fermented or naturally leavened ▪ Neutralising naturally occurring anti-nutrients in these foods: ▪ Phytic acid ▪ Enzyme inhibitors ▪ Tannins ▪ Complex carbohydrates

12 CHARACTERISTICS OF TRADITIONAL DIETS ▪ Balanced Omega 3 – and Omega 6 essential fatty acids ▪ Salt ▪ Animal bones ▪ Gelatine rich bone broths ▪ Provision for the health of future generations: ▪ Special, nutrient rich foods for parents to be, pregnant women and growing children ▪ Spacing of children ▪ Teaching the principles of diet to the young

13 HOW OUR DIETS HAVE CHANGED ▪ Disappearance of wild foods ▪ Reliance on industrial foods ▪ Narrowing range of foods ▪ Modern plant and animal breeding, hybrid seed ▪ Industrial agriculture - effects on soil, crops & animals ▪ Immature harvesting and lack of freshness ▪ Increased use of refined and denatured foods ▪ Less access to the commons

14 HOW OUR DIETS HAVE CHANGED ▪ Introduction of industrially produced foods Loss of enzymes and fermented foods ▪ Nutrient imbalances ▪ Health campaigns – low fat and high fibre foods ▪ Pasteurisation and Homogenisation of milk, removal of fat ▪ Vegetarianism, Veganism, Political campaigns around food choices

15 TRADITIONAL V MODERN DIETS TRADITIONAL DIETS MAXIMIZED NUTRIENTS MODERN DIETS MINIMIZE NUTRIENTS ▪ Foods from depleted soil ▪ Muscle meats preferred, few organ meats ▪ Processed vegetable oils ▪ Animals in confinement ▪ Dairy products pasteurised or ultrapasteurised ▪ Foods from fertile soil ▪ Organ meats preferred over muscle meats ▪ Natural animal fats ▪ Animals on pasture ▪ Dairy products raw and/or fermented

16 TRADITIONAL V MODERN DIETS TRADITIONAL DIETS MAXIMIZED NUTRIENTS ▪ Grains and legumes soaked and/or fermented ▪ Soy foods given long fermentation, consumed in small amounts ▪ Bone broths ▪ Unrefined sweeteners ▪ Lacto-fermented vegetables MODERN DIETS MINIMIZE NUTRIENTS ▪ Grains refined, and/or extruded ▪ Soy foods industrially processed, consumed in large amounts ▪ MSG, artificial flavourings ▪ Refined sweeteners ▪ Processed, pasteurized pickles

17 TRADITIONAL V MODERN DIETS TRADITIONAL DIETS MAXIMIZED NUTRIENTS ▪ Lacto-fermented beverages ▪ Unrefined salt ▪ Natural vitamins occurring in foods ▪ Traditional cooking ▪ Tradition seeds, open pollination MODERN DIETS MINIMIZE NUTRIENTS ▪ Modern soft drinks ▪ Refined salt ▪ Synthetic vitamins taken alone or added to foods ▪ Microwave, Irradiation ▪ Hybrid seeds, GMO seeds

18 SO WHAT DO I EAT??? ▪ We need to design our diet based on an understanding of our ethics, the principles involved, the patterns of the places we live and our cultural needs TECHNIQUES STRATEGIES PATTERNS PRINCIPLES ETHICS

19 FUNDAMENTALS ▪ This stuff is easy, and simple, our ancestors did it for centuries with what was available to them, without any fancy gizmos or degrees ▪ There are some foods that do require appropriate preparation for them to nourish us, our ancestors knew this…..we just lost the memo. ▪ If “all disease begins in the gut." (Hippocrates), so does your health ▪ While our health seems out of control, returning to simple principles can help us reclaim it.

20 WHAT WE ARE GOING TO LEARN TODAY ▪ Bone broth ▪ Fats- butter ▪ Grains- soak nuts ▪ Ferments- sauerkraut, grated carrot & ginger ▪ Dairy- kefir ▪ Anything else you would like to know?

21 VITAMIN A Recommended WAPF Daily intake 12,000 IU ▪ Weston Price found up to 50,000IU daily in some diets ▪ 1 Tbs Organic Butter, fed-high brix grass 6,000 IU ▪ 100g beef liver 50,000 IU ▪ 100g Chicken liver 31,000 IU ▪ 1 tsp Cod liver oil9,500 IU ▪ 100g Sheep liver7,800 IU ▪ 30 g lard 2,000 IU ▪ 1 cup broth 2,100 IU ▪ 2 eggs 1,000 IU ▪ 100g Fish liver ( Pike) 860 IU ▪ 100g Fish Roe 303 IU

22 CALCIUM 500mg daily requirement ▪ 1 cup of raw milk160 mg ▪ 1 cup kefir/yoghurt160mg ▪ 45gms cheese 450mg ▪ Tbsp butter 100mg ▪ 1 cup Bone broth600mg ▪ 1 cup Casserole/stews/soups made with broth300 mg ▪ 200gms green vege 100mg ▪ 1/4 cup nuts if soaked 100mg ▪ Nettle/raspberry leaf tea100mg

23 FATS AND OILS Principles ▪ Fats carry important fat soluble vitamins Vitamin A, D, E, K, and minerals ▪ A-important for growth and development, for the maintenance of the immune system and good vision ▪ D-enhancing intestinal absorption of calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphate and zinc ▪ E-antioxidant, enzymatic activities, gene expression, cell signalling, and neurological function ▪ K-blood coagulation, metabolic pathways in bone and other tissue ▪ Low Fat diets dramatically reduce the intake and availability of these vitamins & minerals ▪ Trans-fats are extremely harmful

24 FATS AND OILS Patterns ▪ Weston A Price observed strong, healthy traditional cultures all ate diets high in fat ▪ These people had no heart disease ▪ Heart disease common once people started eating refined sugars, flours & industrially produced vegetable oils ▪ The “Lipid Hypothesis” is fundamentally wrong ▪ Animal fats are essential for healthy hearts and bodies ▪ Low Fat Diets don't work, and don't allow the body to be fully nourished, or for the DNA to properly express

25 FATS AND OILS A definition of the different types of fats: ▪ Saturated fats: (Animal Fats, Coconut Oil, Palm Oil) Solid at room temp, stable, non reactive ▪ Monounsaturated Fats: (Extra Virgin Olive oil) Liquid at room temp, relatively stable, potential to oxidise when heated ▪ Polyunsaturated Fats: (Most vegetable oils) Liquid at room temp, unstable, reactive ▪ Transaturated fats: (margarines, fast foods, “crisco”) Solid at room temperature, made from liquid oils, often artificially created, hydrogenated, lead to formation of free radicals that cause cell damage

26 FATS AND OILS Strategies ▪ Choose a diet where high % of calories are eaten as traditional fats ▪ Avoid industrial fats and oils Techniques ▪ Cook with ghee, butter, coconut oil, lard, tallow, suet, dripping ▪ Render animal fat to make lard, save fats from roasting and stocks ▪ Use olive oil with salads, and small amounts of cold pressed flax and sesame oils

27 GRAINS, SEEDS AND NUTS Principles ▪ Humans are omnivores, as indicated by the functions of our stomachs ▪ Grains contain anti-nutrients and need processing to be nutritious ▪ There is no essential requirement for carbohydrates in our diet ▪ Refined sugars and starches create blood sugar imbalances in our bodies

28 GRAINS, SEEDS AND NUTS Patterns ▪ Traditional cultures sprouted or fermented grains and ate them unrefined ▪ Archaeology shows us that skeletal strength decreased as grain increased in diet ▪ Diseases of civilisation affected traditional cultures when refined flours, sugar and vegetable oils were introduced into their diets ▪ Other animals evolved to ferment grains a bird’s crop

29 GRAINS SEEDS AND NUTS Strategies ▪ Minimise carbohydrates in your diet ▪ Emphasise getting energy from fats and proteins, rather than carbohydrate Techniques ▪ Sprout and ferment grains ▪ Eat grains unrefined and with saturated fats ▪ Treating grains this way neutralises phytic acids and other anti-nutrients, and increases mineral availablity

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35 DAIRY PRODUCTS Principles ▪ Lactose intolerance common ▪ Pasteurising milk reduces the availability of nutrients ▪ Destroys enzymes useful in proper digestion of minerals

36 DAIRY PRODUCTS Patterns ▪ Raw milk demonised- NOT a disease vector, provided it is produced by healthy animals and clean milking conditions ▪ Presently we can buy raw milk legally in NZ, from raw milk clubs ▪ Organic raw milk v industrial pasteurised, homogenised milk ▪ Raw milk and cultured/fermented milk much more digestible for most people

37 DAIRY PRODUCTS Strategy ▪ Use raw milk from a clean organic supply ▪ Process and ferment the milk according to your individual needs. Techniques ▪ Make kefir or yoghurt to maximise nutritional benefits of milk and minimise health risks

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42 FERMENTATION Principles ▪ Increased enzymes in food improve digestibility, compared to raw food ▪ Preserves and enhances the nutrient properties of the raw food ▪ Allows absorption of minerals and other nutrients – same process as soil ▪ The environments created (acidic or alcoholic) are inhospitable to most bacteria, creating a stable product ▪ Just as the soil microbes are essential for the plant's take up of minerals from the soil, the microbes in our gut are essential for the proper absorption of minerals from our food.

43 FERMENTATION Principles ▪ The most useful bacteria are lactic acid forming bacteria. ▪ Salt creates an environment that encourages lactic acid forming bacteria, suppressing undesirable bacteria ▪ Lactic acid microbes thrive in anaerobic conditions.

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47 FERMENTATION Principles ▪ Ferment improves nutrition by preserving food whilst conserving vitamin C and synthesizing B&K vitamins ▪ Fermenting creates portable and storable substances which are high in protein and contain iodine ▪ Fermenting creates “complete” proteins from low-protein or unavailable protein foods ▪ Fermenting helps to reduce or decompose mycotoxins (aflatoxins and other toxins secreted by moulds)

48 FERMENTATION Patterns ▪ All traditional cultures included fermented foods as an everyday part of their diet ▪ Fermentation is a healthy way to stabalise and preserve many types of food ▪ Coevolution with humans and each ferment in different environments ▪ Simple- no electricity or special equipment necessary ▪ Create flavourful fermented sauces, condiments and pickles to accompany bland foods

49 FERMENTATION Patterns ▪ Commercial “fermented” foods usually pasteurised, for predictability, beneficial bacteria lost, additives, sugar and pasteurised vinegars & acids added- create acidic environment ▪ Probiotics – importance for healthy balance of gut flora- basis for health / disease. ▪ Lactic acid ferments reduce pathogenic bacteria in gut- prescribed after antibiotics

50 FERMENTATION Strategies ▪ Yoghurt ▪ Sauerkraut ▪ Kefir ▪ Sourdough ▪ Gherkins ▪ Pickled Vegetables and Fruits ▪ Salami ▪ Kim Chi ▪ Almost anything can be successfully fermented. Experiment !!

51 FERMENTATION Strategies ▪ Fermented foods can be included in every meal ▪ Need to be cared for on a daily – monthly – yearly basis, depending on ferment ▪ Make in bulk and share and trade ▪ Use non metal containers for fermenting. Including the lids for jars- they’ll corrode ▪ Glass, ceramic and wood containers can all be used ▪ Food grade plastic can be used, but may leave traces in food

52 FERMENTATION Strategies ▪ Chlorinated water and iodised Salt are antibacterial ▪ Environments with antibacterial soaps etc can make life difficult for cultures ▪ Vegetables grown with cholorinated water and fungicides may be difficult to culture as they have no natural bacteria present

53 FERMENTATION Techniques ▪ Lacto Fermentation ▪ Anaerobic process ▪ Wild process ▪ Preserves food for a time period varying from weeks – months ▪ Fermenting fruits and vegetables with a small amount of whey and salt create lactic ferments or lactic pickles ▪ General rule: 1 Tablespoon natural sea salt to 1 litre of fruit / vegetable matter, and 4 Tablespoons whey (from yoghurt or kefir)

54 FERMENTING WITH CULTURES Techniques ▪ Specific cultures can be added to create specific products – like yoghurt ▪ Kefir – Milk Kefir Grains ▪ Multiply when placed in milk and left for 24 hours or more at room temperature ▪ Sours and thickens milk, like yoghurt, slightly effervescent ▪ The grains are strained and used for the next batch, and multiply, so can be divided ▪ Kefir can be thickened by draining the whey to make cheeses

55 HEALTHY GUT FLORA THE KEY TO A HEALTHY BODY "All disease begins in the gut." Hippocrates ▪ Plants require a healthy level of microbes in the soil ▪ Humans require healthy gut flora to maintain optimum health and stay free from infections, allergies and disease ▪ Our gut flora is often damaged, compromised or unbalanced: ▪ Mothers poor gut bacteria ▪ Cesarian section ▪ Antibiotics ▪ Pasturisation of food ▪ Chlorination ▪ Microbe-phobia ▪ Imbalance of “good” vs “bad” bacteria – due to diet

56 HEALTHY GUT FLORA THE KEY TO A HEALTHY BODY Gut dysbiosis has been linked to: ▪ Allergies; hayfever, rashes, digestive, aches etc ▪ Candida, and other yeast imbalances ▪ Inflammation, in joints, skin, organs, brain (headaches), Bladder infections, ▪ Skin disorders, eczema, redness etc ▪ Increased sensitivity to toxins, “hyper sensitive condition.. allergic to everything”

57 HEALTHY GUT FLORA THE KEY TO A HEALTHY BODY Gut dysbiosis has been linked to: ▪ Lack of Energy, Chronic Fatigue and vague diseases ▪ Auto Immune Diseases ▪ Reactions to Immunisations and Vaccines ▪ Behavioral and learning difficulties, including Brain Fog and lack of mental clarity, ADHD, autism, schizophrenia

58 HEALTHY GUT FLORA THE KEY TO A HEALTHY BODY Gut dysbiosis has been linked to: ▪ Digestive problems, including bloating, constipation, gas, digestive pain, cravings, food intolerances. ▪ Malnutrition, lack of absorption of nutrients, even when consumed. ▪ Compromised immunity (meaning the person is much more susceptible to all other diseases)

59 HEALTHY GUT FLORA THE KEY TO A HEALTHY BODY ▪ Symptoms of Gut dysbiosis documented by Dr Natasha Campbell-McBride ▪ “Gut and Psychology / Physiology Syndrome” (GAPS) ▪ Thousands of children and adults treated ▪ Strict diet without starch, carbohydrate or any other allergens ▪ Allows gut to heal and repopulate with healthy flora, not just avoiding triggers ▪ Based on rich bone broths and probiotic foods

60 REFERENCES AND FURTHER RESEARCH ▪ Nutrition and Human Degeneration - Weston A Price ▪ Nourishment Home Grown – A F Beddoe ▪ Nourishing Traditions – Sally Fallon ▪ Change of Heart - Kay Baxter Bob Corker ▪ Eat Fat Lose Fat - Sally Fallon and Mary Enig ▪ Ferment and Human Nutrition - Bill Mollison ▪ Sugar Blues - William Duffy ▪ The Cholesterol Myths - Uffe Ravnskov ▪ Biology of Belief – Bruce Lipton

61 REFERENCES AND FURTHER RESEARCH ▪ Wise Traditions – Quarterly Magazine – W.A.P Foundation. ▪ Deep Nutrition – Dr Catherine Shanahan ▪ Primal Body Primal Mind – Nora Gedgaudas ▪ The Vegetarian Myth – Lierre Keith ▪ Gut and Psychology Syndrome - Dr Natasha Campbell McBride ▪ – WAP foundation website ▪ Most of these books are available through our website: ▪ Check out our workshops, courses and internships:

62 OBJECTIVES Have we got? ▪ A basic understanding of food preparation, enough to take the first steps ▪ “Ferments”, “broths” and “activated almonds” demystified ▪ More understanding of the importance of principles that our ancestors ate by ▪ Increased confidence in cooking and preparing these foods ▪ Ideas of how you can apply what I am teaching into your everyday life ▪ If not, what questions do you have?

63 IN SUMMARY: ▪ This stuff is easy, and simple, our ancestors did it for centuries with what was available to them, without any fancy gizmos or degrees ▪ There are some foods that do require appropriate preparation for them to nourish us, our ancestors knew this…..we just lost the memo. ▪ If “all disease begins in the gut." (Hippocrates), so does your health ▪ While our health seems out of control, returning to simple principles can help us reclaim it.

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65 COOKING NUTRIENT DENSE FOOD


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