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AIA Iowa #A203 Course Title Ensuring compliance of FENESTRATION WITH TODAY’S ENERGY CODES and green standards Speaker: David Warden Date September 26,

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Presentation on theme: "AIA Iowa #A203 Course Title Ensuring compliance of FENESTRATION WITH TODAY’S ENERGY CODES and green standards Speaker: David Warden Date September 26,"— Presentation transcript:

1 AIA Iowa #A203 Course Title Ensuring compliance of FENESTRATION WITH TODAY’S ENERGY CODES and green standards Speaker: David Warden Date September 26, :15 PM

2 Credit(s) earned on completion of this course will be reported to AIA CES for AIA members. Certificates of Completion for both AIA members and non-AIA members are available upon request. This course is registered with AIA CES for continuing professional education. As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by the AIA of any material of construction or any method or manner of handling, using, distributing, or dealing in any material or product. _______________________________________ ____ Questions related to specific materials, methods, and services will be addressed at the conclusion of this presentation.

3 This presentation is protected by US and International Copyright laws. Reproduction, distribution, display and use of the presentation without written permission of the speaker is prohibited. Copyright Materials

4 Fastening ProductsArchitectural Products Commercial Glazing Systems Entrances Curtain Walls Windows & Balcony Doors Residential Glazing Systems Windows & Patio Doors 6.4 Billion $ in Sales 111 Companies 71 Countries 39,000 Employees/Team Members 1,760 Employees in the USA Zippers Webbings Metal Snaps & Buttons Plastic Buckles & Notions Hook & Loop (Self Closing Tape)

5 Course Description Understanding energy code changes and green standards as they relate to energy performance of Aluminum commercial fenestration systems specifically thermal performance characteristics of an elevation and using these products effectively in green strategies.

6 Learning Objectives  Understand recent changes to energy codes and the new green standards  Learn how to pre-qualify thermal performance for a project  Determine when to use performance results based on NFRC sizes and project specific sizes  Work toward sustainable performance with aluminum commercial fenestration

7 What are the recent Energy Code and Green Standard changes and requirements? ASHRAE ASHRAE 90.1 – 2007 ASHRAE 90.1 – 2010 ASHRAE 90.1 – 2013 ASHRAE – 2009 ASHRAE – 2011

8 Energy Code Map Status update as of August ocean.org/ code-status- commercial

9 code-status-commercial

10 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC)

11 International green Construction Code (IgCC)

12 Curtain Wall Window Wall Storefront Fixed Windows (ASHRAE Only) Fixed Fenestration U-Factor Requirements of (Non-Residential Heated Space) Fixed Fenestration Based on Vertical Glazing of 0-40% CodeZone 1Zone 2Zone 3Zone 4Zone 5Zone 6Zone 7Zone 8 Standard Codes ASHRAE ASHRAE ASHRAE ASHRAE IECC IECC IECC IECC Green Codes 2012 IgCC ASHRAE ASHRAE ASHRAE K Based on Vertical Glazing of 0-30% 2 Based on Vertical Glazing of 0-35% 3 Vertical Glazing less than 40%

13 Operable Fenestration Operable Windows Fixed Windows ( ) Sliding Glass Doors Terrace Doors U-Factor Requirements of (Non-Residential Heated Space) Operable Windows Based on Vertical Glazing of 0-40% CodeZone 1Zone 2Zone 3Zone 4Zone 5Zone 6Zone 7Zone 8 Standard Codes ASHRAE ASHRAE ASHRAE ASHRAE IECC IECC IECC IECC Green Codes 2012 IgCC ASHRAE ASHRAE ASHRAE K Based on Vertical Glazing of 0-30% 2 Based on Vertical Glazing of 0-35% 3 Vertical Glazing less than 40%

14 Glazed Entrances Swinging Entrance Doors U-Factor Requirements of (Non-Residential Heated Space) Glazed Entrance Doors Based on Vertical Glazing of 0-40% CodeZone 1Zone 2Zone 3Zone 4Zone 5Zone 6Zone 7Zone 8 Standard Codes ASHRAE ASHRAE ASHRAE ASHRAE IECC IECC IECC IECC Green Codes 2012 IgCC ASHRAE ASHRAE ASHRAE K Based on Vertical Glazing of 0-30% 2 Based on Vertical Glazing of 0-35% 3 Vertical Glazing less than 40%

15 SHGC Requirements All Fenestration SHGC: PF < 0.25 PF < 0.20 for 2015 IECC Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) requirements of (Non-Residental Heated Space) Vertical Fenestration Based on Vertical Glazing of 0-40% CodeZone 1Zone 2Zone 3Zone 4Zone 5Zone 6Zone 7Zone 8 Standard Codes ASHRAE NR ASHRAE ASHRAE ASHRAE IECC NR 2009 IECC IECC IECC / / /NR Green Codes 2012 IgCC ASHRAE ASHRAE ASHRAE K Based on Vertical Glazing of 0-30% 2 Based on Vertical Glazing of 0-35% 3 Vertical Glazing less than 40%

16 Fenestration Industry’s response Fixed Framing Extra Thermally Enhanced Storefronts and Curtain Walls with U- factors under 0.39 Btu/hr. ft 2. oF (W/m 2. oC)

17 18% Better U-factor performance

18 Thermal Comparisons Dual Thermal

19 0° 70° (THERMALLY BROKEN) Surface 4.8° Surface 42.4° Thermal Break Vs Dual Thermal Break

20 0° 70° (DUAL THERMAL BREAK) Surface 3.8° Surface 48.1°

21 0° 70° (THERMALLY IMPROVED) Surface 10.1° Surface 49.2° Thermal Break Vs Thermally Improved

22 0° 70° (THERMALLY IMPROVED & BROKEN) Surface 6.6° Surface 57.4°

23 18 to 20% Better U-factor performance

24 Fenestration Industry’s response Operable Windows Extra Thermal Window designs achieving U-factors in the 0.40 to 0.35 range with C.O.G. U-factors of 0.29

25 29% to 31% Better U-factor performance

26 Fenestration Industry’s response Entrances Thermal Doors achieving U-factors in the 0.50 to 0.60 range with C.O.G. U-factors of 0.29 Exterior doors are one of the leading energy loss areas in a building

27 30 to 37% Better U-factor performance

28 How much can extra thermal systems Improve Thermal Performance? EXTRA

29 High Performance Storefront System Analysis (Performance vs Price)

30 High Performance CW System Analysis (Performance vs Price)

31 High Performance Window System Analysis (Performance vs Price)

32

33 High Performance Entrance System Analysis (Performance vs Price)

34 ASHRAE 90.1 – 2007 & Fenestration and Doors Labeling of fenestration Products. All manufactured fenestration products shall have a permanent nameplate, installed by the manufacturer, listing the U-factor, SHGC, and air leakage rate also requires “Visible Transmittance (VT)” Exception: When the fenestration product does not have a nameplate, the installer or supplier of such fenestration shall provided a signed and dated certification for the installed fenestration listing the U-factor, SHGC, and the air leakage rate Fenestration product rating. U- factors of fenestration products (windows, doors and Skylights) shall be determined in accordance with NFRC 100 by an accredited, independent laboratory, and labeled and certified by the manufacturer. Products lacking such a labeled U-factor shall be assigned a default U-factor from Table (1) or (2). The solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) of the glazed fenestration products (windows, glazed doors and skylights) shall be determined in accordance with NFRC 200 by an accredited, independent laboratory, and labeled and certified by the manufacturer. Products lacking such a labeled SHGC shall be assigned a default SHGC from table (3) IECC 2006 & 2009 IECC - Require Air Leakage labeling, but site – constructed windows and doors do not require labels. Curtain Wall and Storefront can be handled with ASTM E 283 Test Reports Code Requirements

35 Thermal Transmittance (U-factor) Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) Visible Transmittance (VT) Air Leakage (AL) Does not effect energy use Condensation Resistance Factor (CRF) AAMA 507 Purpose A standard method for determining the thermal performance of building specific fenestration systems – The specific elevation Thermal Characteristics to be discussed: Scope Standard Practice for Determining the Thermal Performance Characteristics of Fenestration Systems Installed in Commercial Buildings How do we pre-qualify thermal performance of a fenestration system?

36 U-Factor: Rate of heat loss. The lower the U-factor the better the fenestration’s resistance to heat flow. U-Factor is denoted as BTU/hr. ft 2. o F (W/m 2. o C) U-factor is the inverse of R-Value From our previous example: 1 / 0.46 = 2.2 R-value Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC): Ratio of the solar heat gain entering the space through the fenestration product to the incident solar radiation. The lower the SHGC, the less solar heat it transmits, and the greater its shading ability. SHGC is denoted as a value between 0 and 1 without units. Visible Transmittance (VT): Optical property that indicates the amount of visible light transmitted. The higher the VT the better the quality of daylight allowed thru the fenestration system. Note: The framing blocks all daylight. VT is denoted as a value between 0 and 1, but most VT values fall between 0.30 and Defining the thermal characteristics of fenestration systems

37 Air Leakage (AL): Rate of air infiltration thru a fenestration system. Energy efficiency is lost as air passes thru a fenestration system therefore the lower the AL value the better. Choose systems with a 0.30 cfm/ft 2 or preferably better. AL is denoted as cubic feet per minute per square feet of opening - cfm/ft 2 Condensation Resistance Factor (CRF): Is a ratio of the difference between an average inside surface temperature and the outside air temperature, and the difference between the inside air temperature and the outside air temperature. The higher the CRF, the higher the resistance to condensation. CRF is denoted as a dimensionless rating number between 0 and 100 obtained under standard test conditions as prescribed in AAMA Referenced in AAMA 507 although it does not effect energy use, but is still an important thermal performance characteristic CRF (g) = CRF Glass CRF (f) = CRF Frame T I = Warm Side Air Temperature T II = Cold Side Air Temperature CRF Prediction Formulas CRF (g) =X 100 gT – T II T I - T II CRF (f) =X 100 fT – T II T I - T II gT = Glass Temperature Warm Side fT = Frame Temperature Warm Side Defining the thermal characteristics of fenestration systems

38 Pre-qualifies a Products ability to meet & exceed code requirements with a variety of glazing options. Submit for Code Compliance Consultative Sales * Estimating performance * Glass Spec check AAMA 507 Develops a “Certificate of Compliance”

39 Why is Thermal Performance of specific elevations important? Energy Software analysis and modeling – Energyplus, OpenStudio, Energy-10, Radiance, DOE-2 etc. Determine % over LEED Baseline (LEED projects) Payback analysis HVAC sizing requirements Annual energy costs predictions Comparisons AAMA 507 Purpose A standard method for determining the thermal performance of building specific fenestration systems – The specific elevation

40 Determining the Elevations Performance Calculating a Storefront Elevation Elevation 1 Typical Storefront Information Required: 1.Request Elevation Drawings 2.Determine Proper System 3.Request Proposed Glass or Glass Spec. 4.Request “Center of Glass” (COG) U-Factor and “Center of Glass” Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) 5.Proper AAMA 507 test report* Understand that AAMA 507 test reports will be different for windows (Fixed, Awning, Casement) and Hurricane Products (Wet, Dry, LMI or SMI).

41 Calculating a Storefront Elevation The intermediate mullion is consider a jamb that contributes equally to the left and right lites National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) Technical Interpretation (TI) Storefront or Window Wall Elevation

42 Calculating a Storefront Elevation

43 The calculation is to determine the vision to wall ratio. 1.Elevation is Shown 2.Storefront System 3. 1” Insulated Glass Unit (IGU), ½” Aluminum spacer, air infill 4.COG U-factor = 0.29 COG SHGC = AAMA 507 test report for storefront system Information Required: First Step is to find the vision area: ((3(48”x78”))+(3(48”x24”)))/144 = ft 2 Second Step is to find total area: (150” x 108-3/8”)/144 = ft 2 Third Step is to find the Vision Area/ Total Area (%): ( / ) x 100 = 90.35% Vision TI

44 the AAMA 507 Test Report AAMA 507 Test Report: Using the Graphs Required Information: COG U-Factor = 0.29 Vision Area / Total Area (%) = 90 % Determining the U-factor by using Use the Graph to find the U-Factor of a Storefront system Fourth Step Storefront System

45 AAMA 507 Test Report: Using the Graphs

46 Required Information: U-Factor (COG) = 0.29 Vision Area / Total Area (%) = 90% Using the Graph to find the U-Factor of the Storefront System We Get! Assembly U-Factor = 0.42 Btu/hr. ft 2. o F 0.42 Fourth Step 0.29 the AAMA 507 Test Report Determining the U-factor by using AAMA 507 Test Report: Using the Graphs Storefront System

47 Fifth (Last ) Step Required Information: SHGC (COG) = 0.38 Vision to Wall Ratio = 90% Use the Graph to find the SHGC of the Storefront System AAMA 507 Test Report: Using the Graphs the AAMA 507 Test Report Determining the SHGC by using Storefront System

48 AAMA 507 Test Report: Using the Graphs Storefront System

49 AAMA 507 Test Report: Using the Graphs Assembly SHGC = 0.35 Fifth (Last ) Step Required Information: SHGC (COG) = 0.38 Vision to Wall Ratio = 90% Using the Graph to find the SHGC of the Storefront System We get! the AAMA 507 Test Report Determining the SHGC by using Storefront System

50 Calculating a Curtain Wall Elevation National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) Technical Interpretation (TI) Curtain Wall Elevation The intermediate mullion is considered a jamb that contributes equally to the left and right lites The intermediate horizontals are considered the head and sill and contribute equally to the lites above and below

51 Calculating a Curtain Wall Elevation The calculation is to determine the vision to wall ratio. First Step is to find the vision area: (((2(60”x36”))+(2(60”x84”))+(60”x45”)))/144 = ft 2 Second Step is to find total area: (62.5” x 297.5”)/144 = ft 2 Third Step is to find the Vision Area / Total Area (%): ( / ) x 100 = 91.96% 1.Elevation is Shown 2.Curtain Wall 3. 1” Insulated Glass Unit (IGU), ½” Aluminum spacer, Air infill 4.COG U-factor = 0.29 COG SHGC = AAMA 507 test report for Curtain Wall Information Required:

52 the AAMA 507 Test Report AAMA 507 Test Report: Using the Graphs Required Information: COG U-Factor = 0.29 Vision Area / Total Area (%) = 92% Determining the U-factor by using Use the Graph to find the U-Factor of the Curtain Wall System Fourth Step Curtain Wall System

53 AAMA 507 Test Report: Using the Graphs

54 Need the values: U-Factor (COG) = 0.29 Vision Area / Total Area (%) = 92% Using the Graph to find the U-Factor of the Curtain Wall System We Get! Assembly U-Factor = 0.42 Btu/hr. ft 2. o F 0.42 Fourth Step 0.29 the AAMA 507 Test Report Determining the U-factor by using AAMA 507 Test Report: Using the Graphs Curtain Wall System

55 Fifth (Last ) Step Required Information: SHGC (COG) = 0.38 Vision to Wall Ratio = 92% Use the Graph to find the SHGC of the Curtain Wall System AAMA 507 Test Report: Using the Graphs the AAMA 507 Test Report Determining the SHGC by using Curtain Wall System

56 AAMA 507 Test Report: Using the Graphs Curtain Wall System

57 AAMA 507 Test Report: Using the Graphs System SHGC = Fifth (Last ) Step Need the values: SHGC (COG) = 0.38 Vision to Wall Ratio = 92% Using the Graph to find the SHGC of the Curtain Wall System We get! the AAMA 507 Test Report Determining the SHGC by using Curtain Wall System

58 Review “Certificate of Compliance”  Pre-qualify during submittals  Code Compliance  Consultative selling AAMA 507 Test Reports Find actual performance as designed:  For accurate energy models  Proper HVAC Sizing  Payback analysis  Product comparisons

59 Maximize FENESTRATION in Green Designs

60 Potentially impacts 57% of the building’s energy consumption to envelope relationship Commercial fenestration products can have a big effect

61 Brick Street Mutual Insurance Co., Charleston, West Virginia Architect: Associated Architects, Inc. Building Layout EA Credit 1

62 Work toward achieving sustainable performance with aluminum commercial fenestration What sustainable strategies are most effective when integrating aluminum commercial fenestration into the building design? LEED 2009 Energy and Atmosphere EA Credit 1 Optimize Energy Performance (1-19 points)  Building Layout  Building Orientation  Opening sizes  Sun Control

63 Architect: Metro Architects Energy Savings over a baseline building Building Orientation can save 11.5% Incorporating the proper Sunshades strategy can save 15% Utilizing Light Shelves can save 25% (Based on 50% reduction in day time lighting) Thermal Framing and LowE glass can save 13% Integrating all these strategies could save 34% Plus Based on an energy plus model study San Francisco, CA EA Credit 1 NORTH

64 Materials and Resources  MR Credit 4 Recycled Content (1-2 points)  MR Credit 5 Regional Materials (Cannot qualify) Achieve sustainable performance with aluminum commercial fenestration Pre-Consumer Post Consumer Extracted, harvested or recovered

65 Recycled Content – Post Consumer Aluminum Fenestration can contain Post Consumer recycled content, but due to quality issues with extrusions meeting tempering tolerances and finish post consumer percentages are typically limited to 35%. Some manufacturers avoid post consumer recycled content because of these quality issues. MR Credit 4

66 “Discarded materials from one manufacturing process that are used as constituents in another manufacturing process are pre-consumer recycled materials.” AIA MASTERSPEC 2005 Recycled Content – Pre-Consumer (1/2) Aluminum Fenestration can contain pre-consumer recycled content of 0% to 100% depending on the manufacturer and the requirements of the project Recycled aluminum requires only 5 percent of the energy required to make "new" aluminum. Blending recycled metal with new metal allows considerable energy savings, as well as the efficient use of process heat. MR Credit 4

67 Regional Materials – Extracted Aluminum is a by product of Bauxite mining and would not qualify due to the fact that there are no architectural grade aluminum Bauxite mines operating in the United States Bauxite output in 2005 shown as a percentage of the top producer (Australia- 59,969,000 tonnes) MR Credit 5

68 Indoor Environmental Quality  IEQ Credit 2 Increased Ventilation (1 point)  IEQ Credit 6.2 Controllability of Systems – Thermal Comfort (1 point)  IEQ Credit 8.1 Daylight and Views – Daylight (1 point) Schools (1-2 points)  IEQ Credit 8.2 Daylight and Views - Views Work toward sustainable performance with aluminum commercial fenestration

69 Indoor Environmental Quality – Increased Ventilation Operable Windows can be used if the naturally ventilated option is explored. This strategy can sometimes be used meeting the IEQ Credit 6.2 credit as well to eliminate or reduces HVAC energy demands in some climates. IEQ Credit 2

70 Indoor Environmental Quality – Controllability of Systems Thermal Comfort 20’ x 20’ = 400 sq. ft. x 4% = 16 sq. ft. of ventilation ASHRAE standard paragraph 5.1 Natural Ventilation IEQ Credit 6.2

71 Indoor Environmental Quality – Daylight and Views - Daylight 25 fc minimum 500 fc maximum Measured on September 21 between 9 am and 3 pm fc = foot-candle IEQ Credit 8.1

72 Light Shelf Duluth, MN 46.8° Latitude 3’ Sunshade 3’ Light Shelf 10’ Glazing June o Mar/Sep o Dec o South Elevation Sun angles at Solar Noon Calculating sun angles IEQ Credit 8.1

73 Remember that light reflects at the same angle it is received

74 Formulas and strategies Daylighting Resources and Software Tools Software Tools and guides Radiance Simulation Software IEQ Credit 8.1

75 DIALux Software Can incorporate Sketch-Up models. Daylighting Resources and Software Tools

76 Indoor Environmental Quality – Daylight and Views - Views By using more interior glazed areas 90% of the regularly occupied spaces can maintain a direct line of sight to the out door spaces IEQ Credit 8.2

77 Indoor Environmental Quality – Daylight and Views - Views IEQ Credit 8.2

78 Indoor Environmental Quality IEQ Credit 9 – Enhanced Acoustical Performance (1 Point) For Schools only! STC 35 Sound Transmission Class

79 Environmental Product Declarations In the Life Cycle Analysis an EPD is a standardized way of quantifying the environmental impact of a product or system. MARKET DEMAND for EPD’s is coming LEED V4 – LCA … EPD … HPD

80 Product Category Rules Life Cycle Analysis

81 Learning Objectives  Understand recent changes to energy code and the new green standards  Learn how to pre-qualify thermal performance for a project  Determine when to use performance results based on NFRC sizes and project specific sizes  Work toward sustainable performance with aluminum commercial fenestration

82 I hope you enjoyed this training session. Questions? David Warden Cell: Local Representative: ??? Cell: ??? URL: David Warden Cell: Local Representative: ??? Cell: ??? URL:


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