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ReVISION Establishing a clear vision for Nebraska Career Education.

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Presentation on theme: "ReVISION Establishing a clear vision for Nebraska Career Education."— Presentation transcript:

1 reVISION Establishing a clear vision for Nebraska Career Education

2 Partners Nebraska Legislature NDE/Commissioner/State Board/C & I Team Department of Labor Department of Economic Development Nebraska Economic Development Association Postsecondary Education Educational Service Units State/Local Chambers of Commerce

3 Purpose Align CTE with Nebraska’s labor market needs and economic initiatives Develop Nebraska’s talent pipelines for economic growth and workforce development Strengthen secondary CTE to align with postsecondary entrance expectations Create a common language between employers and education

4 Outcomes Alignment with workforce and economic development priorities Engage local/regional businesses in career education programming Analyze and update current programs of study and curricular offerings Evaluate K-12 career guidance and career exploration curricula

5 ONE YEAR Part 1: School’s Assessment of Current Career Education Programs Part 2: Meeting Facilitated by Nebraska Career Education Staff Part 3: Community Engagement Meeting Part 4: Meeting Facilitated by NCE Staff Part 5: Technical Assistance by NCE Staff (As requested by the school) Step A: Participate in and Complete the reVISION Orientation Step B: reVISION Grant Application preWORKThe reVISION process

6 Perkins Reserve – Submit competitive grant for participation – When completed eligible for Action Grant Competitive Action Grant – Implement plan – Must be aligned to H3, Labor Market Demands and Economic Priorities Funding

7 Program of Study change Refocusing/elimination of courses/programs Reprioritizing CTE in districts Significant community involvement Image/perception change Statewide recognition Impact

8 It’s about: – Data – Right people at the table – Clear mission – Leadership Lessons Learned

9 Transforming CTE in Tennessee Danielle Mezera, Ph.D. Assistant Commissioner Transforming CTE in Tennessee Danielle Mezera, Ph.D. Assistant Commissioner

10 The Challenge How do we define educational success? How do our students define success? How do we ensure all of these align? How do we define career success? Realizing Postsecondary & Career Readiness Through CTE

11 Ultimately, how do we ensure that our students experience rigorous and robust learning pathways that provide real options upon graduation? Realizing Postsecondary & Career Readiness Through CTE

12 Responding to the ChallengeResponding to the Challenge CTE in TennesseeCTE in Tennessee

13 Redefining Student Learning To meet the needs of Tennessee, our state’s Career & Technical Education must be a Robust, Aligned Academic/Career 7 th -16 th Learning Pathway Image Credit: Corporate Voices for Working Families Realizing Postsecondary & Career Readiness Through CTE

14 14 University or College (B.A./B.S) Community College (A.A./A.S) Middle School Technology College (Industry Certification) What Should a Student Pathway Look Like? High School RELEVANT Work-Based Learning (grades 7-14) Early Postsecondary Opportunities/ Obtained Credits (Grades 9-12) Career Awareness (Grades 7-14) Stackable Credentials (Grades 9+) SUSTAINABLE Secondary & Postsecondary Academic Seamless Alignment (“On/Off Ramps”) Industry Engagement Community Engagement Realizing Postsecondary & Career Readiness Through CTE

15 Rigorous, Relevant Courses and Student Plan Secondary/ Postsecondary Program Alignment “Data Mining” to Drive Decision Making Education/ Career Transition Supports Sustainable Student Pathways Early Postsecondary Opportunities Student Pathway Components Education and Industry Alignment Realizing Postsecondary & Career Readiness Through CTE

16 Career & Technical Education Work- Based Learning DC/DE Project Based Learning Student Activities SAE STEM Technical Skill Attainment Tennessee State Standards Standards / Instruction Assessments PD / Training Learning Environment Sequential Courses General Education Citizenship Math Courses ELA Courses Social Studies Courses Science Courses Communication Skills Writing Prompts Industry Certifications Career Cluster Programs of Study Academic Learning Robust, Aligned Academic/Career 7 th -16 th Learning Pathway 21 st Century Skills Team Work / Collaboration Work Ethic Technology Fluency Problem Solving Creativity Critical Thinking Realizing Postsecondary & Career Readiness Through CTE

17 Reforming our Courses Moving from Misalignment to Alignment from Competencies to Course Standards Reforming our Courses Moving from Misalignment to Alignment from Competencies to Course Standards

18 Multi-Phased, Multi-Year Approach: Overview PhaseGoalImplementation Phase I Streamline our existing courses and programs of study SY Phase II Add relevant new courses and new programs of study, revise courses to align to higher student expectations SY Phase III Measure success of students with rigorous assessment options for all courses SY Immediate Wins: Eliminate redundancies Streamline for greater flexibility Organize curriculum in POS using existing courses Deeper Dive: Revise existing courses Develop new courses Increase relevance of POS to reflect stronger alignment Measuring Success: Provide opportunities to evaluate student achievement using assessment options Realizing Postsecondary & Career Readiness Through CTE

19 Summary of Phase I and Phase II Revisions Realizing Postsecondary & Career Readiness Through CTE

20 20 Course Standards Reform: Look and Feel Realizing Postsecondary & Career Readiness Through CTE

21 Side-by-Side: The New Look and Feel Old: Family and Consumer Sciences (FACS) New: Introduction to Human Studies 5.0 Apply nutrition and food principles that enhance individual and family well­being across the life span. 5.1 Analyze factors that influence personal and family nutrition and meal management across the life span. 5.2 Examine basic nutrition needs and results of dietary practices across the lifespan. 5.3 Demonstrate table service and dining etiquette. 5.4 Acquire 100% mastery of safety and sanitation standards necessary to ensure a safe environment for laboratory experiences. 5.5 Select and prepare nutritious foods applying the current federal dietary and safety and sanitation guidelines. 4. Cite specific textual evidence from U.S. Food and Drug Administration and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to analyze necessary dietary practices and specific recommendations for physical health, including dietary guidelines and meal plans. Research the importance of balanced nutrition on human development and productivity, and the correlation to mental health and wellness. (TN Reading 1, 2; TN Writing 2, 7, 9; FACS 14) Old course standards often relied on vague wording and multiple competencies to convey student expectations, providing little guidance for how teachers should approach instruction… …while new standards are “meatier,” outlining concrete expectations without limiting teacher flexibility to design tasks appropriate for his/her students. Realizing Postsecondary & Career Readiness Through CTE

22 Old Standard and Competencies: Landscaping and Turf Management 6.0 Investigate different aspects of management of turf grasses. 6.1 Evaluate the functions and components of a turf grass. 6.2 Evaluate different turf grasses as … to particular hardiness zones. 6.3 Determine site selection and preparation for turf grass establishment. 6.4 Evaluate the methods of lawn installation. 6.5Determine ph and nutrient needs…establishment and maintenance 6.6Identify equipment … 6.7 Determine pest control methods for the maintenance of turf grasses 6.8Evaluate special needs in the management of residential, commercial and sports turf. New Standards: Landscaping and Turf Science 7. Cite specific textual evidence to compare and contrast the functions and components of turf grasses of common turf grass species. Demonstrate the ability to visually identify and distinguish between turf grass species and cultivars and compose an argument justifying their applications for specific uses. (TN Reading 1; TN Writing 1, 9) 8.Describe methods for the establishment and maintenance of turf grasses, including soil preparation, installation, water, nutrient and pH needs, and fertilizing techniques, attending to appropriate ratios and calculations. Draw conclusions about the importance of site selection, site preparation, and consideration of hardiness zones in the selection of turf grass species and cultivars. (TN Reading 3, 9) Side-by-Side 8 competencies Realizing Postsecondary & Career Readiness Through CTE

23 Additional Sample Standards Study a schematic plan of a typical municipal water distribution system. Citing evidence from a technical description or actual observation of a system, explain how water travels from a water treatment plant to a fixture in a residence. Create a graphic illustration to represent the movement of water from one component to the others in the system. For example, sketch an isometric drawing of a simple water distribution system and label its components. (TN Reading 1, 2, 3, 4, 7; TN Writing 2, 9) —Mechanical, Electrical, & Plumbing Systems II Describe the components and purpose of a basic contract document for a residential project. Recognize the relationship and responsibilities of various parties to a contract. Write a basic contract for a construction job, such as a carpenter’s contract to complete a deck addition for a residential client. (TN Reading 2, 3, 4, 5; TN Writing 4) —Residential & Commercial Construction I Realizing Postsecondary & Career Readiness Through CTE

24 Additional Sample Standards Review drawings and interpret American National Standards Institute (ANSI) symbols to explain the function of a basic industrial hydraulic system. Develop a written text that outlines, describes, and logs recommended regular preventative maintenance on hydraulic equipment and controls. Use the text as a guide to execute the recommended procedures and record the details of the maintenance, explaining how the preventative maintenance will minimize failures in hydraulic equipment. (TN Reading 2, 3, 4, 9; TN Writing 1, 4) —Advanced Electromechanical Technology Research and explain Mendel’s model of inheritance. Using this model, trace the pattern of appearance within a family for a heritable disease that is on the recessive allele and one that is on the dominant allele. Develop an argumentative essay regarding how a certain biotechnology could genetically modify a gene to prevent this disorder, citing information from textbooks and/or professional journals and websites. (TN Reading 2, 3, 4, 9; TN Writing 1, 4, 8, 9; AP Biology E.U. 3.A, 3.B.)—Biomedical Applications Realizing Postsecondary & Career Readiness Through CTE

25 Programs of Study  Highlights: A total of 58 programs of study are slated for the school year, representing all 16 national career clusters. This tally includes brand-new programs of study in majority of career clusters. In addition, the programs of study have been streamlined to focus on coherence and sequence within a pathway, with significantly less reliance on plug-in electives and confusing multiple options.  High-Level Changes: In response to feedback from educators and research into state and national employment trends, Construction pathways have moved toward an integrated model, while still retaining options for specialization at the higher levels. Welding has transitioned to the Advanced Manufacturing cluster based on research into industry employment needs. Majority of programs of study have Level 4 practicum courses that infuse new work-based learning standards and intensive performance-based standards intertwined with on-the-job experiences. Realizing Postsecondary & Career Readiness Through CTE

26 Robust, Integrated Learning Approach 1. General Education Courses 2. Lab Science Credit 3. Personal Finance Credit 4. Work-Based Learning Opportunities 5. Early Postsecondary Opportunities (Statewide/Local Dual Credit, Dual Enrollment, AP, etc) Career Cluster Program of Study Level 1Level 2Level 3Level 4 Health Science Diagnostic Services Health Science Education Diagnostic Medicine Anatomy and Physiology -and/or- Medical Terminology Cardiovascular Services -and/or- Clinical Internship Advanced Manufacturing Mechatronics Principles of Manufacturing Digital Electronics Mechatronics IMechatronics II STEMTechnology Principles of Engineering and Technology Digital Electronics Robotics & Automated Systems Engineering Practicum -and/or- AP Physics AgricultureAgribusiness Agriscience Principles of Agribusiness Organizational Leadership and Communications Agricultural Business & Finance Supervised Agricultural Experience Student Pathway: Anatomy of Programs of Study Realizing Postsecondary & Career Readiness Through CTE

27 Looking Ahead Establishing End-of-Course Assessments and the Implementation of a Robust Portfolio of Outcome Measures Looking Ahead Establishing End-of-Course Assessments and the Implementation of a Robust Portfolio of Outcome Measures

28 Currently in the exploration and development phase of offering authentic assessment options for CTE courses  Assessment options will present opportunities for LEAs to: Effectively measure and reward student learning Effectively measure and give productive feedback to improve teaching Identify and share best practices and lessons learned across the state Implementation Field Test & Pilot Exploration & Development Research & Proposal Multi-Phase Reform: Phase III Realizing Postsecondary & Career Readiness Through CTE

29 CTE Outcome Measures Realizing Postsecondary & Career Readiness Through CTE Outcome-Based Measures (by Explorer, Completer, and Concentrator and by demographics – as applicable, depending on grade level)  Student Achievement o Previous student achievement o End-Of-Course scores (Other) o ACT scores  Early Postsecondary Opportunities (DE, DC, AP)  Industry Certifications (transferable - leading to immediate employment or postsecondary credit/hours)  Secondary and Postsecondary Remediation (Math/ELA)  Postsecondary Enrollment upon Graduation  CTE Teacher Data  CTE End-of-Course Assessments (currently in development process) o Envision: EOC exams for all Level 1 courses; version of formative exams for Levels 2 & 3; Level 4 courses will take various forms (e.g. EOC exams, EPSOs, portfolios, certifications) o Timeline: Field test specific assessments for SY; Operationalize other existing identified assessments

30

31 Kansas Career Technical Education Blake Flanders, Ph.D. Vice President Workforce Development

32 Statute Policy Procedure

33 K.S.A  review existing and proposed postsecondary technical educational programs and program locations …for approval or disapproval of such programs for state funding purposes;

34 K.S.A  …develop strategies and programs for meeting needs of business and industry…

35 Review Curriculum Committee Plan & Endorse Alignment 4 Recommend Credentials & Exit Points 2 - Endorse Third-party Nationally Recognized Industry (Student) Credential - Identify Value-added Exit Points, including A.A.S. Review Research 1 Staff Research - Survey Results - College Programs - Third Party Student Industry Credential - Industry Accreditation Program Alignment Procedure

36 Select A Rep To Serve On The Curriculum Committee 3 State Curriculum Committee - Identify Competencies and Skills Supporting B&I Identified Exit Points - Determine Maximum Program Length - Develop Courses for K-12 Articulation Select A Rep To Serve On The Curriculum Committee 3 Review Curriculum Committee Plan & Endorse Alignment 4 - Review Alignment Outcomes (e.g., map, letter, etc.) - Provide Letter of Endorsement - Follow Approval Process (TEA, BAASC, & KBOR) Program Alignment Procedure

37 Career Technical Program Alignment  Credit hour programs aligned with industry-recognized credentials  Common courses  Common exit points  Common length

38 Industrial Machine Mechanic Program Alignment – Kansas Board of Regents CIP /15/2014 Industrial Machine Mechanic Degree CMRT Credential 15 Credit Hours of General Education (minimum) Industrial Machine Mechanic Degree CMRT Credential 15 Credit Hours of General Education (minimum) Industrial Machine Mechanic CMRT Credential Industrial Machine Mechanic CMRT Credential Certificate C Maximum of 57 Credits Certificate C Maximum of 57 Credits A.A.S. Maximum of 68 Credits A.A.S. Maximum of 68 Credits

39 Required Courses within Program Common Courses 13 credits: OHSA 101 credit Industrial Programmable Logic Controls (PLC)3 credits Mechanical Systems3 credits Mechanical Systems Reliability3 credits Industrial Process Control 3 credits Support Courses credits: Direct & Alternating Current/Basic Electricity3-4 credit Fundamentals of Motor Control/ Electrical Control Systems I2-3 credits Variable Speed Motor Controls/ Electrical Control Systems III2-3 credits Industrial Fluid Power/Fluid Power I & II4-6 credits Math3 credits Course list sequence has no implication on course scheduling by colleges. Institutions may add additional competencies based on local demand. Notes Specifics pertaining to Industrial Machine Mechanic programs: 1.Graduates will take and are expected to earn the Certified Maintenance and Reliability Technician (CMRT) certification through the Society for Maintenance and Reliability Professionals Certifying Organization (SMRP). 1.Educational Competencies align with CMRT requirements. 1.The common course may represent opportunities for colleges to connect to K- 12 CTE pathways. 1.Level C certificates that do not include any general education course and lead to the AAS degree cannot be greater than 53 credit hours to maintain the 68 credit hour maximum for the AAS degree. Notes Specifics pertaining to Industrial Machine Mechanic programs: 1.Graduates will take and are expected to earn the Certified Maintenance and Reliability Technician (CMRT) certification through the Society for Maintenance and Reliability Professionals Certifying Organization (SMRP). 1.Educational Competencies align with CMRT requirements. 1.The common course may represent opportunities for colleges to connect to K- 12 CTE pathways. 1.Level C certificates that do not include any general education course and lead to the AAS degree cannot be greater than 53 credit hours to maintain the 68 credit hour maximum for the AAS degree. Industrial Machine Mechanic Program Alignment – Kansas Board of Regents CIP /15/2014

40 K.S.A Excel in Career Technical Education  SB 155 passed by Legislature  Provided funding for: Tuition for secondary students enrolling in college-level tiered technical courses Incentives to local districts for graduates earning industry certifications Transportation reimbursement to districts providing student access to postsecondary technical programs Marketing to increase student participation in career technical programs

41 Success of SB155

42 K.S.A  develop benchmarks and accountability indicators of programs to be utilized in the awarding of state funding …;

43 Outcome Metrics Pilot Project Benchmarks  Industry recognized credential attainment benchmark for pilot: 90 percent of technical program concentrators exiting postsecondary education at an approved exit point will have attained an industry credential  Student employment after exiting benchmark for pilot: 80 percent of technical program concentrators exiting postsecondary education at an approved exit point will be employed  Wages of students employed after exiting benchmark for pilot: Wages of those employed program will be at or above 95 percent of the statewide entry level wage for the occupation corresponding to the student’s field of study

44 80% Employment

45 95% of Entry Level Wage *Note: The average Kansas wage in 2012 was $40,630 annually.

46 Programs Exceeding Both Employment and Wage Targets

47 Accelerating Opportunity: Kansas  Delivers career/technical education at the same time as adult basic skills instruction in a career pathways framework  Partnership between Regents and Commerce, with Department for Children and Families

48 Accelerating Opportunity: Kansas AO-K Year 1 TotalsYear 2 TotalsYear 3 To-Date**Cumulative* Enrollments1, ,118 College Certificates ,350 Industry Recognized Credentials Awarded 1,1911,0861,5143,791 Individuals Completing a 12- Credit Hour Pathway ,116 Number Employed * Enrollment headcount is unduplicated ** Initial reporting period not complete until

49 Senate Substitute for House Bill 2506  Supported by legislation effective July 1, 2014: AO-K Proviso: tuition support for students in Accelerating Opportunity Pathways GED Accelerator: college incentives for GED participants and industry recognized credentials

50 Questions


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