Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

1 Multi Sensory Environment (MSE) Training SENSORIUM 2 Partial proceeds from this training goes to the Hidden Angel Foundation 11/8/20091(c) Fornes, 2009.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "1 Multi Sensory Environment (MSE) Training SENSORIUM 2 Partial proceeds from this training goes to the Hidden Angel Foundation 11/8/20091(c) Fornes, 2009."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Multi Sensory Environment (MSE) Training SENSORIUM 2 Partial proceeds from this training goes to the Hidden Angel Foundation 11/8/20091(c) Fornes, 2009

2 SENSORIUM 2 THE NERVOUS SYSTEM NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN NEUROSCIENCE, 11/8/20092(c) Fornes, 2009

3 Nervous System Overview Sensory Neurons Sympathetic Nervous System Nervous System Central Nervous SystemPeripheral Nervous System Brain StemSpinal CordMotor Neurons Autonomic Nervous SystemSomatic Nervous System Parasympathetic Nervous System 11/8/20093(c) Fornes, 2009

4 Central Nervous System -The Brain Steam & Spinal Cord Frontal Lobe Temporal Lobe Parietal Lobe Occipital Lobe Cerebellum Cervical Spinal Cord Thoracic Spinal Cord Lumbar Spinal Cord Cauda Equina 11/8/20094(c) Fornes, 2009

5 Central Nervous System - The Brain Stem The brain stem is the home of the origins or site of termination of fibers in 9 of the 12 cranial nerves. The brain stem is divisible into three continuous parts: the midbrain, the pons, and the medulla. The midbrain is most rostral and begins just bellow the diencephalon. The pons is in the middle and is overlain by the cerebellum. The medulla is caudal to the pons and is continuous with the spinal cord. Cerebellum Pons Hypophysis Corpus callosum Hypothalamus Thalamus Cingulate Gyrus Medulla Oblongata Mid Brain Frontal Lobe Temporal Lobe Occipital Lobe Fourth ventricle Parietal Lobe 11/8/20095(c) Fornes, 2009

6 Central and Peripheral Nervous System The basic functional unit in the CNS is the neuron. Electrophysiological impulses travel down a neuron from its dendrites to the cell body and axon. Information then is chemically transmitted to other neurons via connections know as synapses. 11/8/20096(c) Fornes, 2009

7 Peripheral Nervous System The PNS contains cranial and spinal nerves that consists of neurons that give rise to axons, which grow out of neural tube, and neurons derived from neural crest cells. Skeletal motor neurons, and axons of preganglionic autonomic neurons are derived from neural tube. Neural crest cells form sensory neurons and postganglionic autonomic neurons. Neuronal cell bodies of these neurons are found in the ganglia. All ganglia found in the PNS contains either sensory or postganglionic autonomic neurons. 11/8/20097(c) Fornes, 2009

8 811/8/2009

9 9(c) Fornes, 2009

10 MSE Encompasses an Understanding of the: AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM RETICULAR ACTIVATING SYSTEM LIMBIC SYSTEM Many individuals with disabilities are attempting to “self regulate” through their overt behaviors to get “enough” sensory input or eliminate sensory input to allow the brain stem production of the biogenic amines either to excite, inhibit and the combination thereof, the nervous system 11/8/200910(c) Fornes, 2009

11 Autonomic Nervous System Sensory Neurons Sympathetic Nervous System Nervous System Central Nervous SystemPeripheral Nervous System Brain StemSpinal CordMotor Neurons Autonomic Nervous SystemSomatic Nervous System Parasympathetic Nervous System 11/8/200911(c) Fornes, 2009

12 Autonomic Nervous System (ANS): The Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) is responsible for the motor innervations of smooth muscle, cardiac muscle and glands of the body. The ANS is composed of two divisions, the Sympathetic and the Parasympathetic In both divisions there are two neurons in the peripheral distribution of the motor innervation. 1) Preganglionic neuron with a cell body in CNS. 2) Postganglionic neuron with a cell body in a ganglion in the PNS. The ANS is responsible for Life itself. All behavior is accompanied by an ANS reaction. This system integrates autonomic and neuroendocrine functions for homeostasis and communicates directly with other brain stem centers that control heart rate, respiration, and hunger. The sympathetic and parasympathetic systems work jointly together to produce states of arousal from high to low. The “just right” combination allows for “Doing & Learning” in very simple terms. 11/8/200912(c) Fornes, 2009

13 THE SYMPATHETIC SYSTEM Is responsible for the neurotransmitters of the adrenaline chemistry class which is responsible for your “fright, flight, and fight” responses. (The adrenal gland also adds to this) Prepares the system for action (arousal) Some characteristics of sympathetic arousal include: ◦ Sweating, pupil dilation, pallor (color) associated with blood flow ◦ increased heart rate, increases in respiration the adrenaline chemistry is part of a sub group of the biogenic amines, one group of neurotransmitters released from the brain stem. adrenaline helps produce high states of arousal. Thus, the “adrenaline rush” you feel when you respond to a dangerous event 11/8/200913(c) Fornes, 2009

14 THE PARASYMPATHETIC SYSTEM responsible for maintenance of ongoing function of levels of action or arousal. (It primarily inhibits high states of high arousal). some characteristics of parasympathetic action: ◦ a slowing of the heart rate ◦ a slowing of respiration ◦ the low state of alertness after eating The “just right” combination allows for “Doing and Learning” in very simple terms The sympathetic and parasympathetic systems work jointly together to produce states of arousal from high to low 11/8/200914(c) Fornes, 2009

15 THE RETICULAR SYSTEM the basic rhythm generator responsible for levels of: ◦ awakeness ◦ alertness ◦ asleep ◦ attention ◦ circadian rhythms the RS can modulate cell thresholds which increase or decrease (excite or inhibit) sensitivity to sensory signals (input) depending on the importance in relation to survival at any point in time the RS can be thought of as the filter that prioritizes flow to give us “selective unconscious attention” 11/8/200915(c) Fornes, 2009

16 THE LIMBIC SYSTEM anatomically situated over the brain stem highly interactive with many limbic structures primarily responsible for the emotional component of human behavior emotions must be integrated and coordinated with rational behavior through the frontal lobes and with the level of alertness through the Reticular System the limbic system sets the basic mood for behavior based on past experience. (Memory development and retrieval) It contributes to interpretation of all new sensory input by comparing it to past experiences. 11/8/200916(c) Fornes, 2009

17 THE LIMBIC SYSTEM The Limbic System may assigns emotional experiences to the visceral components controlled by the ANS. (Such as changes in breathing, heart rate, gastrointestinal functions, etc.) suggesting that: if a sensory experience was pleasurable then based on this past experience the sensory stimulus would be approached if the sensory experience has been traumatic or negative then the sensory stimulus would be avoided 11/8/200917(c) Fornes, 2009

18 Autonomic Nervous System Reticular Activating System Limbic System These systems can be thought of as interfaced with overlapping and interacting functions with one another, that produce and mediate states of arousal that prepare a person for “fleeing” or “higher function” MSE contributes to this process by the use of sensory pleasurable experiences 11/8/200918(c) Fornes, 2009

19 mse 11/8/200919(c) Fornes, 2009

20 Neuroscience - New Developments Please view video Sensorium 2 11/8/200920(c) Fornes, 2009

21 Neuroscience - New Developments New developments in neuroscience provide some answers as to why MSE has such positive outcomes for individuals. Neuro plasticity, Neuro chemistry, Brain synchronization and neural oscillations. Stress Brain Arousal 11/8/200921(c) Fornes, 2009

22 Neuroscience - New Developments New developments in neuroscience provide some answers as to why MSE has such positive outcomes for individuals with disabilities. These included Neuro plasticity, Neuro chemistry, Brain synchronization and neural oscillations. Stress Brain Arousal 11/8/200922(c) Fornes, 2009

23 Neuroscience - New Developments New developments in neuroscience provide some answers as to why MSE has such positive outcomes for individuals with disabilities. These included Neuro plasticity, Neuro chemistry, Brain synchronization and neural oscillations. Stress Brain Arousal 11/8/200923(c) Fornes, 2009

24 Neuroscience - New Developments New developments in neuroscience provide some answers as to why MSE has such positive outcomes for individuals with disabilities. These included Neuro plasticity, Neuro chemistry, Brain synchronization and neural oscillations. Stress Brain Arousal 11/8/200924(c) Fornes, 2009

25 Neuroscience - New Developments New developments in neuroscience provide some answers as to why MSE has such positive outcomes for individuals with disabilities. These included Neuro plasticity, Neuro chemistry, Brain synchronization and neural oscillations. Stress Brain Arousal 11/8/ (c) Fornes, 2009

26 2611/8/2009

27 Stress Stress Can be a “demand” (reasonable or otherwise) made by a person, place or thing on an individual as perceived by that individual. A dynamic state within the person as a response to a demand for adaptation. Adaptation being an active response or thought process. Stress is a part of human existence required both internally and externally for life itself. Stress should be thought of as represented by degree in the human experience. Either too much stress or not enough stress is unhealthy and effects our behavior and thinking process. A Stressor is any stimulus that produces a demand for adaptation. It may be social, physical, or environmental. An Adaptive Response is the ability to react actively and purposefully to ever changing circumstances. Also maybe referred to as Adaptive behavior. An action or thought, that meets new challenges and learns from this new experience for future action or thought 2711/8/2009(c) Fornes, 2009

28 28 I THINK IT’S STRESS !!!! 11/8/2009

29 Neuroscience - New Developments New developments in neuroscience provide some answers as to why MSE has such positive outcomes for individuals with disabilities. These included Neuro plasticity, Neuro chemistry, Brain synchronization and neural oscillations. Stress Brain Arousal 11/8/200929(c) Fornes, 2009

30 The MSE experience manipulates the brain chemistry through the senses to set the tone for motivation and functional attention it lowers the stress chemistry and increases the relaxation chemistry. the key is finding the combination of sensory input that allows the individual to take control once the balance has been achieved this balance allows “arousal, self-regulation”, “motivation, “organization”, and “integration” to take place for the individual. ◦ Self-regulation is the ability to control one’s activity level and state of alertness as well as control one’s emotional, mental or physical responses to sensations; the concept of self-organization. MSE and Brain Arousal 11/8/200930(c) Fornes, 2009

31 Brain Arousal Brain arousal is fundamental to all cognition and behavior (Pfaff, 2006). Nearly all health problems flow from over-arousal, under- arousal, or instability in the central nervous system. Neural pathways are the underlying mechanism for brain arousal. Disrupting brain arousal mechanisms can cause problems ranging from mild loss of vigilance or sleep, to the devastation of a vegetative state. The brain and nervous system has a capacity to determine if the stimulus is ◦ (a) relevant (or important), ◦ (b) valued (assigning a positive, negative, or neutral value to the stimulus), and ◦ (c) properly modulated, referring to the ability of the nervous system to regulate its own activity. Stimulation at the right level increases the level of fascination. Pfaff, /8/200931(c) Fornes, 2009

32 AROUSAL IS A DYNAMIC, EVER CHANGING PROCESS RELATED TO DIRECT & INDIRECT RESPONSES TO INTERNAL & EXTERNAL STIMULI (c) Fornes, Slide by Linda Messbauer 11/8/2009

33 BRAIN AROUSAL IS MODIFIED AND ALTERED THROUGH: 1. The registration of the stimulus at the 2. The habituation process of the nervous system. It’s ability to depress synaptic transmissions to repeated non-noxious, irrelevant stimuli. 3. The neuron’s ability to react: by an increased response to stimuli that is intense and noxious, referred to as “sensation”. 4. The brain’s capacity to determine if the stimulus : a)RELEVANT (IT IS IMPORTANT) b)VALUED (ASSIGNING A POSITIVE, NEGATIVE OR NEUTRAL VALUE TO THE STIMULUS. c)PROPERLY MODULATED: ABILITY OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM TO REGULATE ITS OWN ACTIVITY (Pfaff, 2006) 11/8/200933(c) Fornes, 2009

34 AROUSAL INCREASES WITH: Intensity Complexity Unexpectedness Incongruity Affective meaning Novelty (c) Fornes, AROUSAL DECREASES WITH: Constancy Repetition Familiarity Neutrality Pfaff, /8/2009

35 THE OPTIMAL LEVEL OF AROUSAL IS: UNIQUE TO EACH INDIVIDUAL A “SENSORY DIET” IS OUR ATTEMPT TO MODIFY STRESSORS AND CONTROL AROUSAL LEVELS (c) Fornes, Slide by Linda Messbauer 11/8/2009

36 Arousal levelActivity LevelStimulation level Balance arousal level with activity level low arousal*low activity ^stimulation to ^arousal & activity level high arousalhigh activity match arousal level with meaningful stimulation to decrease high activity level Look at it as Backward Chaining with their Sensory Diet needs low arousal*high activity match activity level with increased meaningful stimulation to increase arousal level Their Sensory Diet Needs *can be people in shut down either the person shuts everything out and closes down completely or they can be people who shut down by displaying high activity in the form of self-injurious, self-stimulatory behavior Slide by Linda Messbauer 11/8/200936(c) Fornes, 2009

37 Our Inspiration Christopher Douglas Fornes ( ) For further information: Sandra Fornes phone: fax: Christopher Douglas Hidden Angel Foundation (CDHAF) is a registered charitable organization in Canada and the USA. 11/8/200937(c) Fornes, 2009


Download ppt "1 Multi Sensory Environment (MSE) Training SENSORIUM 2 Partial proceeds from this training goes to the Hidden Angel Foundation 11/8/20091(c) Fornes, 2009."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google