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Conducting an interview Read this PowerPoint and take notes as needed. Develop questions for your interview. Set up appointment. (See me if you need help.

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Presentation on theme: "Conducting an interview Read this PowerPoint and take notes as needed. Develop questions for your interview. Set up appointment. (See me if you need help."— Presentation transcript:

1 Conducting an interview Read this PowerPoint and take notes as needed. Develop questions for your interview. Set up appointment. (See me if you need help contacting someone or getting an appointment.) Bring cell phone/video camera Note: If you need a school camera, you must watch a video about how to use it Check any facts/information you are told during interview Type your notes immediately so you dont forget anything Remember, dialogue makes writing longer and stronger. You can ensure a higher grade with a great interview.

2 Preparing for the interview Don't go to an interview unprepared. Check files and library for information on your subject or topic. Have your questions ready. Don't expect the interviewee to tell you voluntarily what you want to know. (Even if you plan to interview your grandpa, he needs to know you are prepared!) Your questions help organize your thoughts and remind you to get the answers you want. Write one question on each index card.

3 After you research and write your questions…… Make an appointment. You can't go into a busy office and get 30 minutes of someones time unless you first set up an appointment. Call and ask when it is convenient. Then make sure you arrive on time.

4 What to take to the interview Take these things with you: A pen/pencil Index cards with questions Cell phone/camera A grain of salt. Be a bit skeptical and don't believe everything you're told.

5 How to conduct an interview Introduce yourself. Shake hands. Look the person in the eye. Don't be so busy taking notes that all the interviewee sees is your fingers flying as you write and the top of your head. Double-check dates and spelling of names with the person. Even a name like Smith can be spelled differently.

6 Conducting an interview DO THIS Begin with easy, sociable questions to relax the person you're interviewing. Let the interviewee know you know something about him or her. Ask open-ended questions that invite a lengthy answer and can bring out opinions: ''How did you react?'' or ' Why do you think that happened?'' or What do you make of that?

7 Conducting an interview DONT DO THIS ….. Dont ask questions that appear to have predetermined answers. Don't ask questions that allow one-word answers. Don't ask negative questions like, ''Nothing else? Don't make it easy to say ''no.' Dont appear to be in a hurry to get the interview over.

8 How to take notes Some kind of shorthand is a must. Make up your own form of shortened writing, such as ''w/o'' for for around, about, at, or ''inc'' for incomplete. Put quote marks around direct quotes in your notes. It is unnecessary to write complete sentences unless you want a direct quote.

9 Tips for a great interview Concentrate on what you are seeing and hearing. Immediately after the interview, type your notes. Write down specific information you cannot trust to memory: ages, names, statistics, sums of money. Do not be afraid to double-check unclear information. If you are not sure what you just heard or if something is unclear, ask!

10 Ask for an anecdote We learned this year the importance of anecdotes (One Time When). Ask the interviewee for one. Can you tell me one time when …? Can you give me an example …? Tell me about a time that happened. These little stories/memories tell about the interviewee such as his loyalty, bravery, persistence, etc. Exciting writing is built on exciting anecdotes, so be sure to get one or two.

11 Watch the person Watch your subject as he is talking About 70 percent of communication is non-verbal. To tell a story, you must provide the reader with the complete story. Observe non-verbals, such as: Body gestures Facial expressions Paralanguage (the way something is said: sarcastic, funny) Artifacts (what the person is wearing) Movements (pounded the table, snapped fingers)

12 Study the environment Look around you. Look at the bulletin boards, desk top, pictures on the wall, etc. How does this relate to the interviewee? Look for awards, pictures of kids, places the interviewee has visited, etc. Ask questions about anything interesting.

13 ALWAYS ASK THESE QUESTIONS Never end a phone interview or personal interview without asking: Is there anything else I should know? Is there anything I didnt ask that you think I should have asked? Is there anyone else you think I need to interview to make sure I have enough information? WRITE THESE QUESTIONS ON YOUR CARDS!

14 Conducting an interview Always thank the person for his time.

15 Conducting an interview Once you are done …. Download the interview from phone/camera Check audio and video Return the camera if you borrowed it TYPE your notes ASAP so you dont forget anything TYPE the citation information Check facts, make follow-up calls if needed


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