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1 An Introduction to the SIOP Model Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol.

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Presentation on theme: "1 An Introduction to the SIOP Model Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 An Introduction to the SIOP Model Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol

2 2 Authors and Background Research

3 3 Authors Jana Echevarria Chair of the Department of Educational Psychology, Administration and Counseling at California State University, Long Beach. Mary Ellen Vogt Co-Director of the CSU Center for the Advancement of Reading and Professor at California State University, Long Beach. Deborah Short Director of the Language Education and Academic Development division at the Center for Applied Linguistics.

4 4 Background Research 7-year research project for CREDE (Center for Research on Education, Diversity & Excellence) Developed with extensive input and feedback from practicing teachers Began as a research observation instrument Supportive research comparing SIOP ESOL classrooms with control-group ESOL classrooms After several years, found to be reliable & valid measure of SI. Source:

5 Writing Assessment Mean Scores by Subtest

6 Writing Assessment Gains

7 7 Most Recent Research SIOP researchers also used the IMAGE (Illinois Measure of Annual Growth in English): Mandated by the state of Illinois to measure program validity and reliability. The IMAGE is a summative academic achievement test which measures how well ELLs perform academically in English from year to year. The test content is the same as the ISAT with language accommodations made for ELLs. Most recent results are below:

8 8 True or False To build background knowledge about sheltered instruction, participants will play Sign In Please/Secret Answer. Read each statement. Decide if it is true or false. Hold up the correct sign.

9 9 Introduction to SIOP True or False? Sheltered Instruction is used in a variety of program models. True!

10 10 Introduction to SIOP True or False? Sheltered Instruction cannot be used in classes that contain both English language learners and native English speakers False! Sheltered Instruction can be used in all classes that contain ELLs.

11 11 Introduction to SIOP True or False? Sheltered Instruction is the same as high quality instruction for native English speakers. False! Language is gained faster while learning content because the language is contextualized and used in meaningful ways.

12 12 Introduction to SIOP True or False? Language development classes should be separate from content classes for ELLs to learn best. False! Language is gained faster while learning content because the language is contextualized and used in meaningful ways.

13 13 Introduction to SIOP True or False? In Sheltered Instruction classes, teachers integrate ESL standards. True! National, state, and district ESL Standards are excellent sources of language objectives for Sheltered Instruction classes.

14 14 A means for making grade-level academic content (e.g., science, social studies, math) more accessible for English language learners while at the same time developing their English language skills. The practice of highlighting key language features and incorporating strategies that make the content comprehensible to students. (adjusting speech, providing background information, using appropriate instructional tasks) Sheltered Instruction classrooms mix native & ELLs and integrate language & content while infusing sociocultural awareness. An approach that can extend the time students have for getting language support services while giving them a jump start on the content subjects they need for graduation. What is Sheltered Instruction? Using the SIOP Model. Copyright Center for Applied Linguistics.

15 15 Cooperative Learning Standards PA & ESL Differentiated Instruction Learning Styles Inquiry-based Instruction CALLA Student-directed vs. Teacher-directed

16 16 SIOP Components

17 17 1. Preparation 2. Building Background 3. Comprehensible Input 4. Strategies 5. Interaction 6. Practice/Application 7. Lesson Delivery 8. Review/Assessment Eight Components

18 18 Component 1: Preparation Language objectives Content objectives Appropriate content concepts Supplementary materials Meaningful activities Accommodating all levels of proficiency

19 19 Watch the video clip on preparation. Watch preparation segment Record observations about student engagement and evidence of teacher preparedness. We will discuss in small and then whole groups. Preparation: Video

20 20 Read pages to define language and content objectives. Use a Venn Diagram to compare/contrast the two objectives. Then read pages about Ms. Chens lesson. Use lesson plan rubric or figure 2.2 on p. 42. Discuss in small and then whole group. Preparation: Book

21 21 Language Objective Determine the Language Function Name Describe Classify Compare Explain Predict Infer Suggest Evaluate, etc. Identify Language Structure(s) Sentence Starter Cloze sentence frame Key Vocabulary- Content vocabulary, connectors, prepositions, adjectives Real-Life Mini Language Lesson- grammar

22 22 SIOP Lesson Plan: Angie Aldrich Robert E. Lee Elementary, Long Beach, CA Angie Aldrich Robert E. Lee Elementary, Long Beach, CA Language Objectives: Students will use key vocabulary while telling their addition stories: first, then, together, plus, and equals. They will state the equation for the story, appropriately. Content Objectives: Students will deepen their understanding of the concept of addition through oral storytelling with the use of manipulatives. They will connect addition stories to math equations, and write the equations. Grade: 1 Math Beginners w/ a few native speakers Topic: Addition Stories

23 23 LOCO Lets practice creating a Language Objective and a Content Objective. In small groups, create a language and content objective using the lesson from the text. Write both objectives. Be prepared to share with the whole group.

24 24 Preparation Teaching Ideas for implementing the SIOP Model – Preparation Success through Scaffolding Task Analysis The Four Domains SIOP Flow Chart

25 25 Whats Going On? The questions that p______ face as they raise ch_____ from in_____ to adult life are not easy to ans_____. Both fa_____ and m______ can become concerned when health problems such as co___ arise any time after the e____ stage to later life. Experts recommended that young ch____ should have plenty of s_____ and nutritious food for healthy growth. B____ and g____ should not share the same b_____ or even sleep in the same r_____. They may be afraid of the d_____.

26 26 Whats Going On? The questions that poultrymen face as they raise chickens from incubation to adult life are not easy to answer. Both farmers and merchants can become concerned when health problems such as coccidiosis arise any time after the egg stage to later life. Experts recommended that young chicks should have plenty of sunshine and nutritious food for healthy growth. Banties and geese should not share the same barnyard or even sleep in the same roost. They may be afraid of the dark.

27 27 Component 2: Building Background Concepts linked to background experiences Links between past learning and new concepts Key vocabulary emphasized

28 28 What is known about poor readers… They read less often because reading is difficult and frustrating. Poor readers dont read enough to improve their vocabulary knowledge. Poor comprehension is a result of not reading. The cycle results in a gap between proficient and non- proficient readers that grows exponentially. Being a poor reader may lead to school drop out.

29 29 We Learn… 10% of what we read 20% of what we hear 30% of what we see 50% of what we see and hear 70% of what we discuss with others 80% of what we experience personally 95% of what we teach to someone else

30 30 Reading Across Content Areas One of the most persistent findings in reading research is that the extent of students vocabulary knowledge relates strongly to their reading comprehension and overall academic success. -Lehr, Osborn and Hiebert, 2005

31 31 Is it worth it? An average student learns about 3,000 words per year. For students who learn only 1,000 words per year, a gain of 300 words equals a 30% increase This is significant if repeated year after year. - Stahl, 1999

32 32 Building Background: Video Watch the video clip on building background. Take notes on the variety of techniques the teacher uses to build background. Share your observations with your small group. Be prepared to share with the whole group.

33 33 Read the lesson in your text Decide what information the students would need to be successful in the lesson. Develop an activity with your group. Building Background: Book

34 34 SIOP Lesson Plan Angie Aldrich Robert E. Lee Elementary, Long Beach, CA Key Vocabulary: First Then Together Plus Equals Materials: Chart paper with addition poem (Apples), flannel boards with manipulative pieces, white boards and markers, index cards with equations and answers for matching game that have been cut in half. Building Background: Motivation: Begin by reading the addition poem, Apples, which students have read previously. Refer to pictures for added visual support. As a class, read the poem three times. Focus on key vocabulary.

35 35 Quick Write Review additional activities that build background. Choose activities to use in your lesson plan to tap/build prior knowledge. Write your ideas in your notes.

36 36 Building Background Teaching Ideas for implementing the SIOP Model – Building Background Realia, photos and illustrations KWL Chart Surprise Book

37 37 Comprehensible Input Read the vignette regarding Mr. Corbins lesson. In your own words, what is the definition of comprehensible input?

38 38 Component 3: Comprehensible Input Speech appropriate for students proficiency level Clear explanation of academic tasks A variety of techniques used to make content concepts clear

39 39 CI and Language Proficiency Levels Review 5.2 to determine the appropriate CI to use with varying language proficiency levels. Refer to Can Do statements. Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5

40 40 Comprehensible Input: Video Watch video segment How did the teacher make the content comprehensible? Record observations on the notes pages. After the video, discuss observations in a small and then a whole group.

41 41 CI Quilt Use 5.3 to jigsaw these techniques for CI. Small groups will have 1-2 techniques. Make a CI quilt by folding paper into fours. In one box, name the technique. In the second box, define it. In the third box, give an example of how the approach can be used in your subject area. In the last box, write the actions you will take to use it in the classroom.

42 42 Presentation: Review the objectives and tell students that they will be making addition stories using the flannel boards and practicing using three important words (first, then, together). Explain that they will also be writing the equation that goes with the addition story. Using a flannel board, model how to tell an addition story using the three key vocabulary words. Write the corresponding equation on a white board. Check for understanding during the modeling by including students in the story telling. Ask students to tell a story and help with writing the equation. SIOP Lesson Plan Angie Aldrich Robert E. Lee Elementary, Long Beach, CA

43 43 Comprehensible Input Teaching Ideas for implementing the SIOP Model – CI TPR Idiom Match-up Alternate Materials

44 44 Word Splash Do a word splash to tap prior knowledge of strategies. Take turns sharing the pen. Write strategies or anything else that comes to mind when you think of strategies.

45 45 Think of a bridge… Think of building a bridge or building. When can the scaffold be removed? When it is standing on its own.

46 46 Component 4: Strategies Scaffolding Varied questioning techniques to develop HOT skills Learning Strategies CALLA: Cognitive Academic Language Learning Acquisition; developed by Anna Uhl Chamot, J. Michael OMalley

47 47 When Teaching Strategies, Help Students Learn…. Declarative Knowledge (state or name strategy) What does it mean to … Procedural Knowledge How should I use …. Conditional Knowledge When and why do I use ….

48 48 A Model of Scaffolding TeacherTeacherPeerStudent CenteredAssistedAssisted Centered Mini-lecture PracticePeerApply Explicit Teacher Modeling Strategies Instruction Modeling Cooperative Learning

49 49 Strategies: Video Watch the video clip on strategies. Record observations on the activities used to promote strategic thinking. Use the notes page to record observations. Discuss observations in a small group and then a whole group.

50 50 SIOP Lesson Plan Angie Aldrich Robert E. Lee Elementary, Long Beach, CA Higher Order Questions: What would happen if you replaced the two apples on the tree with three apples? What other way can you say this problem?

51 51 HOTS Questions Use the Levels of Thinking or 6.7 and 6.8. In groups, create questions for your previously created LOCO using the top 4 levels of Blooms Taxonomy. Each person writes one on a post-it note. Do a conga line or an inner-outer-circle- share. Collect and post on SIOP flow-chart poster. Add additional information to lesson plans.

52 52 Strategies Teaching Ideas for implementing the SIOP Model – Strategies Directed Reading Thinking Activity Question Prompts for Different Levels T-Chart SQPRS

53 53 SIOP Bingo Read your SIOP BINGO board. Each board contains questions about SIOP. If you can answer four questions in a row yell, SIOP. The first person to answer 4 questions in a row (vertically, horizontally or diagonally) wins.

54 54 Classroom Activities Chart Reflect on the activities used today. What activities have been modeled that can be used in the classroom? Discuss and add to the Classroom Activities chart?


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