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© JordanBurr 2008 Female haircuts – Square layer.

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Presentation on theme: "© JordanBurr 2008 Female haircuts – Square layer."— Presentation transcript:

1 © JordanBurr 2008 Female haircuts – Square layer

2 © JordanBurr 2008 Introduction The graduated bob is one of the most sophisticated styles to emerge from the 1990s. The line of the cut and the balance of the shape, suits most hair types and face shapes. Over the years the shape has changed from the solid cut of the 1960s into a technical haircut using a combination of vertical lines and horizontal graduation. Graduation is a term used to define a system of cutting hair which allows the hair shape to move upwards, backwards and/or forwards, depending on the style required. Today, graduated cuts are a lot more textured and are achieved using thinning scissors and razors. Bolder colours are used to give a choppier and more modern look. And layers are often used to give softness to the shape. There are two methods of achieving graduation: –elevation - lifting the hair; and –combing - taking the hair to a shorter point on the haircut.

3 © JordanBurr 2008 Step 1 of 11 - Before you cut The ideal face shape for this cut is square or oval. The texture of the hair should be straight or slightly wavy, and hairlines should be flat and even. Our model has a oval face shape and even hairlines. Tip: The graduated bob cut is divided into three areas: back, side and front.

4 © JordanBurr 2008 Step 2 of 11 - Back Area Take a centre parting section from the top of the crown to the nape. Then take a curve section across the occipital bone at the back of the head. It is important that you work very cleanly. To achieve maximum tension in the hair as you cut, keep the hair wet and use the fine teeth of your comb. To get the best results with this haircut you need to be very precise. Make your sections and cutting lines very clean. Tip: Remember to position yourself in line with the sections. This will help you achieve even weight distribution throughout the cut.

5 © JordanBurr 2008 Step 3 of 11 - Nape Area Head shape in a slightly forward position. Begin at the nape area, holding the hair out at a 45-degree angle and cut, remembering to keep the hair wet at all times with maximum tension. This section will determine the overall length for your haircut. Pull the hair out from the head, with the back of your hand at the nape and the top of your fingers angled away from the head. This first section is important because the hairlines at the nape determine the length of the haircut. The stylist here is using the inside of their fingers. This is the only way you can achieve the correct angle for this cut. Placing the back of your hand against the client's neck this will help to have more control. Tip: The way you position your fingers determines the length you create. To create length at the top of the section, your fingers should be angled away from the top of the head.

6 © JordanBurr 2008 Step 4 of 11 - Occipital Area Continue to work up to the occipital area holding the hair out to a 45-degree angle. It is important that the head is in a forward position. Working out from the centre, hold the hair parallel from the head at a 45-degree angle, work from one side to the other. Remember to keep the tension even and to keep the hair wet at all times. Repeat the same procedure on the other side. To make sure your cut is balanced, follow the guideline from the middle. The angle of your fingers, tension of the hair and position of your body are all very important at this stage. You are now creating the guide you will use in the next area of the cut. When you have checked the balance of the back section, cross check by working your way through the hair in the opposite direction to the cut. If you cut the hair using vertical sections, cross check horizontally and vice versa.

7 © JordanBurr 2008 Step 5 of 11 - Diagonal sections To achieve graduation, lift the guide away from the head. Keep the angle to below 90- degrees and make sure you use the same angle on both sides. You should take great care to be precise when making this haircut. Repeat on the opposite side. We are now starting to build up the weight line. Take diagonal sections from the top of the occipital to the top of the ear. Working on one side at a time, hold the hair between the fingers. The hair is combed to its natural fall and elevated to a stationary 45-degrees and the cutting line is continued. Use the guide to work forward through the section, remembering to create length at the front.

8 © JordanBurr 2008 Step 6 of 11 - Working up the head Our stylist is using elevation on each section to create a softer edge. See how the hair is pulled down to follow its natural fall. Directing the hair forward or backward would alter the graduation. Using this technique, work up to the natural parting. Then repeat the same procedure on the other side. At this point in the cut, you can use minimum tension to allow for any irregularities in the hair growth patterns. Diagonal forward sections are taken working up the head and the graduation method is repeated. As we progress to the top of the head, the head shape is bought up to a natural position. The hair is still elevated to a stationery 45- degree angle. At this stage we should check balance and graduation. You should start to see the length at the front of the hair.

9 © JordanBurr 2008 Step 7 of 11 - Side sections At this stage, take your guide from the occipital area. Use the guide to work forward through the section, remembering to create length at the front. To achieve graduation, lift the guide away from the head. Keep the angle to below 90 degrees and make sure you use the same angle on both sides. You should take great care to be precise when making this haircut. Horseshoe sections are taken from below the crown to the front hairline pivoting diagonal towards the front. As we blend into the sides, direct the hair back and away from the face, this will allow us to build up length. The hair is elevated to a stationery 45-degree angle and held between the fingers, with one finger width. The hair from the top box area should be allowed to fall into its natural or designed parting. Here, our stylist is connecting the sections from the back of the crown.

10 © JordanBurr 2008 Step 8 of 11 - Side sections You should start to see the length at the front of the hair. Our stylist is using elevation on each section to create a softer edge. See how the hair is pulled down to follow its natural fall. Directing the hair forward or backward would alter the graduation. Using this technique, work up to the natural parting. Then repeat the same procedure on the other side. At this point in the cut, you can use minimum tension to allow for any irregularities in the hair growth patterns. Tip: Remember: minimum tension will create minimum graduation. Angling your fingers towards the front will create length.

11 © JordanBurr 2008 Step 9 of 11 - Fringe Section You do not always have to cut a fringe. To allow for any movement or irregular hairlines, cut the fringe area freehand. Take a section from the outside corner of the eye to the front centre of the head. Cut from the outside towards the centre, keeping the hair wet at all times. Repeat the same steps on the other side, checking the balance as you go. The hair will fall freely from the head to achieve its natural shape. Continue to work up to your section, remembering to cut freehand.

12 © JordanBurr 2008 Step 10 of 11 - Finished result You can see from the finished, wet result that the shape of this cut is very soft.

13 © JordanBurr 2008 Step 11 of 11 - Finished result You can see from the finished, wet result that the shape of this cut is very soft. It was created using a medium round brush. See blow-drying techniques for details. Our stylist has cut this hairstyle with a fringe. Whether you use a fringe should depend on your and your client's personal choice. For more on this, see the page on fringes.


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