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Producing an X-ray Exposure By Professor Stelmark.

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Presentation on theme: "Producing an X-ray Exposure By Professor Stelmark."— Presentation transcript:

1 Producing an X-ray Exposure By Professor Stelmark

2 Phases of the x-ray exposure: Prep phase Exposure phase

3 Prep phase prepares the cathode and anode for the exposure

4 Prep phase Activated by pressing exposure switch halfway down

5 Prep phase Activated by pressing a separate prep button

6 The anode begins to revolve 3,000 – 4,000 rpm Filament heats up to at least 2,200 deg. Celsius. Thermionic emission liberates electrons. Space charge is created

7 The ready light comes on

8 Exposure Phase Activated by pressing exposure switch all the way down or by activating a separate exposure switch

9 Anode rotates. Strong positive charge is developed. Projectile electrons strike the target. X-rays are being produced. Thermionic emission continues. Cathode develops strong negative charge. Projectile electrons depart for the anode.

10 X-rays originate in the target ( focal spot) Exposure will continue until set time is terminated by the timer or the operators finger is taken off the button. No x-rays are produced after the exposure is terminated

11 X-ray Emission The intensity of the x-ray beam of an x-ray imaging system is measured in roentgens (R) or milliroentgens (mR) and is called the x-ray quantity. Another term, radiation exposure ( primary signal intensity), is often used instead of x-ray intensity or x-ray quantity. All have the same meaning and all are measured in R or mR. X-ray quantity is the number of x-rays in the useful beam

12 Primary Factors The primary exposure technique factors the radiographer selects on the control panel are milliamperage, time of exposure, and kilovoltage peak (kVp). Depending on the type of control panel, milliamperage and exposure time may be selected separately or combined as one factor, milliamperage/second (mAs). Regardless, it is important to understand how changing each separately or in combination affects the radiation reaching the IR and the radiographic image.

13 Prime Exposure controlling factors mAs (mA x time) kVp ( potential difference) kilo x volt x peak SID ( distance)

14 The quantity of x-ray photons in an exposure cannot be determined by either the mA or the exposure time alone. Although mA determines the rate of x-ray production, it does not indicate the total quantity, because it does not indicate how long the exposure lasts. Exposure time does not indicate the total quantity either, because it does not measure the rate of x-ray production. To determine the quantity of radiation involved in an exposure, both mA and time must be considered. mA x Time (sec) = mAs

15 220 mA x (sec) = 16.94mAs

16 As the mAs is increased, the quantity of radiation reaching the IR is increased. As the mAs is decreased, the amount of radiation reaching the IR is decreased.

17 Changes in mAs have a direct effect on density. A.Original image. B.Decreased in density when the mAs is decreased by half. C.Increase in density when the mAs is doubled.

18 When the kVp is increased at the control panel, a larger potential difference occurs in the x-ray tube, giving more electrons the kinetic energy to produce x-rays and increasing the kinetic energy overall. The result is more photons (quantity) and higher energy photons (quality).

19 The kVp affects the exposure to the IR because it alters the amount and penetrating ability of the x-ray beam. Altering the penetrating power of the x-ray beam affects its absorption and transmission through the anatomic tissue being radiographed. Higher kVp increases the penetrating power of the x-ray beam and results in less absorption and more transmission in the anatomic tissues

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21 Higher kVp increases the penetrating power of the x-ray beam and results i less absorption and more transmission in the anatomic tissues

22 As the thickness of the body part is increased, the quantity of radiation reaching the IR is decreased. As the thickness of the body part is decreased, the amount of radiation reaching the IR is increased.

23 As SID is increased, the x-ray intensity is spread over a larger area.

24 The Radiographic Images Analog Digital

25 An image in which continuous variation in the scene being sensed is represented by continuous variation in image tone, such as the image produced from photosensitive chemicals in a photographic film. Analog Image High radiographic density/ high optical density. Dark or black areas on the radiograph Low radiographic density/ low optical density. light or clear areas on the radiograph

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27 A digital image is a representation of a two-dimensional image using discrete numerical values. Digital Image low image brightness (high optical density) refers to dark or black areas on the digital image High image brightness (low optical density) refers to bright or white areas on the digital image

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