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9.2.11 Outline the Role of Phloem in Active Translocation of Sugars (sucrose) and amino acids from source (photosynthetic tissue to storage organs) to.

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Presentation on theme: "9.2.11 Outline the Role of Phloem in Active Translocation of Sugars (sucrose) and amino acids from source (photosynthetic tissue to storage organs) to."— Presentation transcript:

1 Outline the Role of Phloem in Active Translocation of Sugars (sucrose) and amino acids from source (photosynthetic tissue to storage organs) to sinks (fruits, seeds, roots)

2 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Nutrient Transport –Movement from Source to Sink A process of phloem transport moves sugars through a plant from a source to a sink. A source is any cell in which sugars are produced by photosynthesis. A sink is any cell where the sugars are used or stored (fruits, roots, seeds).

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4 Vascular Tissue PHLOEM Tissue Phloem Cells are alive. Sieve Tube elements (cells) lacks nucleus & cytoplasm Sieve tube elements are connected to each other via sieve plates Sieve plates have holes which allow movement of water and dissolved organic molecules Companion Cells has nucleus and dense cytoplasm Companion cells are attached to sieve tube element via plasmodesmata Sieve plate

5 Phloem Translocation Summary 1.Translocation moves the organic molecules (sugars, amino acids) from their source through the tube system of the phloem to the sink. Phloem vessels still have cross walls called sieve plates that contain pores. 2. Companion cells actively (active transport) load sucrose (soluble, not metabolically active) into the phloem. 3. Water follows the high solute in the phloem by osmosis. A positive pressure potential develops moving the mass of phloem sap forward. 4. The sap must cross the sieve plate. Current hypothesis do not account for this feature. 5. The phloem still contains a small amount of cytoplasm along the walls but the organelle content is greatly reduced. 6. Companion cells actively unload (ATP used) the organic molecules 7. Organic molecules are stored (sucrose as starch, insoluble) at the sink. Water is released and recycled in xylem.

6 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall STEP 1 Sugars produced during photosynthesis (source cells) are actively (using ATP) pumped into the sieve tubes. This loading of sugar is accomplish by Active Transport. Sugar molecules Movement of water Movement of sugar Phloem Xylem Source cell

7 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall STEP 2 As sugar concentrations increase in the sieve tubes, water from the xylem moves into the sieve tube by osmosis. Movement of water Movement of sugar Sugar molecules Phloem Xylem Source cell

8 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Movement of water Movement of sugar STEP 3 This movement of water causes a positive pressure to build up in the sieve tube that results in a bulk flow of phloem sap. This movement does not require energy. Sugar molecules Phloem Xylem Source cell

9 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall STEP 4 The pressure diminishes by the removal of sugar from the sieve tube at the sink. This removal of sugar is accomplished via Active Transport (uses ATP) The sugar is converted into starch and starch in insoluble and exerts no osmotic affect. Xylem Phloem Movement of water Movement of sugar Sink cell

10 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall STEP 5 Xylem recycles the relatively pure water by carrying it from the sink back to the source. Movement of water Movement of sugar Xylem Phloem Sink cell

11 Transport in Plants Summary 1. Source produces organic molecules 2. Glucose from photosynthesis produced 3.Glucose converted to sucrose for transport 4. Companion cell actively loads the sucrose 5. Water follows from xylem by osmosis 6. Sap volume and pressure increased to give Mass flow 7. Unload the organic molecules by the companion cell 8. Sucrose stored as the insoluble and unreactive starch 9. Water that is released is picked up by the xylem 10. water recycles as part of transpiration to re supply the sucrose loading

12 Watch the below animations on translocation Click on the links below to access animations: b6dvKgWBVY&feature=related b6dvKgWBVY&feature=related QubU&feature=related QubU&feature=related


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