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Chapter Eleven The Great Transformation, 1828-1840.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter Eleven The Great Transformation, 1828-1840."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter Eleven The Great Transformation,

2 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.11-2 Berkin, Making America Chapter 11 There was a dramatic increase in the number of periodicals published in the United States between 1825 and 1850 because of 1. the transportation revolution. 2. a sudden increase of literacy across the nation. 3. the need for more information about economic conditions in remote locations. 4. the vast population increase attributable to improving economic conditions.

3 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.11-3 Berkin, Making America Chapter 11 There was a dramatic increase in the number of periodicals published in the United States between 1825 and 1850 because of 1. the transportation revolution. Hint: The speed with which information could now move from one part of the country to another caused the increase in the number of newspapers and magazines. See page 310.

4 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.11-4 Berkin, Making America Chapter 11 The Allegheny Portage Railroad reflected 1. the failure of steam power to take hold in American transportation before the Civil War. 2. British control of the American transportation network. 3. Pennsylvania’s attempt to compete against New York’s Erie Canal. 4. the growing importance of remote interior regions in the South.

5 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.11-5 Berkin, Making America Chapter 11 The Allegheny Portage Railroad reflected 3. Pennsylvania’s attempt to compete against New York’s Erie Canal. Hint: See page 308 for the portage railroad and pages 309–310 for the successful use of steam power.

6 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.11-6 Berkin, Making America Chapter 11 Underscoring the importance of canals to the developing transportation network, 1. slaves were employed even in the North to construct them. 2. nearly all states in the North and West invested money to build them. 3. railroad developers sometimes violently sabotaged them. 4. the Supreme Court declared laws regulating them unconstitutional.

7 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.11-7 Berkin, Making America Chapter 11 Underscoring the importance of canals to the developing transportation network, 2. nearly all states in the North and West invested money to build them. Hint: See pages 307–309.

8 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.11-8 Berkin, Making America Chapter 11 Prior to the emergence of the factory system of manufacture, 1. interchangeable parts generally did not exist. 2. craftsmen and their workers resided and socialized together. 3. owners’ wives helped manage their husbands’ business affairs. 4. All of these

9 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.11-9 Berkin, Making America Chapter 11 Prior to the emergence of the factory system of manufacture, 4. All of these Hint: Because a, b, and c are all true, this is the correct choice.

10 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 11 Perhaps the most distinctive characteristic of the famous Lowell mills was that they 1. manufactured gunpowder and munitions. 2. employed unmarried farm girls in large numbers. 3. were among the first mills to use electric power. 4. relied heavily on interchangeable parts.

11 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 11 Perhaps the most distinctive characteristic of the famous Lowell mills was that they 2. employed unmarried farm girls in large numbers. Hint: The mill owners provided dormitories and strict supervision for young, unmarried female workers, thereby assuring their parents that they would not go astray. See page 313.

12 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 11 A group that suffered because of the new technology of interchangeable parts was 1. small farmers residing in the South. 2. young female workers in the Lowell textile mills. 3. skilled journeymen. 4. Irish immigrants.

13 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 11 A group that suffered because of the new technology of interchangeable parts was 4. skilled journeymen. Hint: Interchangeable parts reduced the need for the skills and knowledge of the journeymen. See pages 312–316.

14 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 11 The cult of domesticity most accurately describes 1. the lifestyles of factory women. 2. the responsibilities of farm wives. 3. the ideal of upper-class, nonworking women. 4. religious convictions of families in factory towns.

15 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 11 The cult of domesticity most accurately describes 3. the ideal of upper-class, nonworking women. Hint: The members of this so-called new genteel class were, according to the cult of domesticity, called upon to devote themselves to their homes and families. See page 320.

16 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 11 Which of the following statements about immigrants in the period 1820– 1850 is accurate? 1. Most were Roman Catholic. 2. Their numbers decreased steadily in the period. 3. Most came from England. 4. They quickly blended in with American society.

17 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 11 Which of the following statements about immigrants in the period 1820– 1850 is accurate? 1. Most were Roman Catholic. Hint: The Irish were Catholics, as were many of the German immigrants. See pages 313–316.

18 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 11 Changes in urban America in the second quarter of the nineteenth century were a result of the development of 1. suburban housing tracts. 2. a labor system built around craftsmen, journeymen, and apprentices. 3. public transportation. 4. slums and tenements.

19 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 11 Changes in urban America in the second quarter of the nineteenth century were a result of the development of 4. slums and tenements. Hint: See page 316.

20 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 11 Slaves were protected from excessive physical abuse by their owners because 1. state legislatures passed laws prohibiting corporal punishment. 2. they were valuable investments. 3. the owning class feared the frequent slave insurrections that occurred. 4. the clergy denounced physical punishment as unChristian.

21 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 11 Slaves were protected from excessive physical abuse by their owners because 2. they were valuable investments. Hint: See pages 325–327.


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