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By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005. By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 Invitation Here's your invitation to a friendly, high- tech hobby.

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Presentation on theme: "By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005. By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 Invitation Here's your invitation to a friendly, high- tech hobby."— Presentation transcript:

1 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005

2 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 Invitation Here's your invitation to a friendly, high- tech hobby that's got something fun for everyone! You can become an Amateur Radio operator--no matter what age, gender or physical ability. People from all walks of life pass their entry-level exam and earn their Amateur (ham) Radio license. They all share the diverse world of activities you can explore with ham radio.

3 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 Whos out there You never know who you'll run into when communicating with Amateur Radio: Young people, retirees, teachers and students, engineers and scientists, doctors, mechanics and technicians, homemakers...

4 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 News People Walter Cronkite, KB2GSD

5 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 Musical People

6 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 Talk Show People Art Bell W6OBB

7 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 People from all walks

8 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 Fun for All Ages Amateur radio is fun for all ages from age 8 to 80. Hams are always ready to communicate.

9 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 Getting started Getting started in ham radio has never been easier! We invite you to explore the following information and learn about Amateur Radio, and a little about us, the ARRL... the National Association for Amateur Radio, a non-profit membership organization. We've been helping hams get started since 1914! We know you'll enjoy this fascinating world of Amateur Radio, and we hope to have the chance of meeting you on the air--when you become an Amateur Radio operator!

10 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 A FUN Hobby... What Can Amateur Radio Operators Do? Ham radio operators use two-way radio stations from their homes, cars, boats and outdoors to make hundreds of friends around town and around the world. They communicate with each other using voice, computers, and Morse code. Some hams bounce their signals off the upper regions of the atmosphere, so they can talk with hams on the other side of the world. Other hams use satellites. Many use hand-held radios that fit in their pockets.

11 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 A FUN Hobby... Hams exchange pictures of each other using television. Some also like to work on electronic circuits, building their own radios and antennas. A few pioneers in Amateur Radio have even contributed to advances in technology that we all enjoy today. There are even ham-astronauts who take radios with them on the International Space Station and thrill thousands of hams on earth with a call from space!

12 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 With a SERIOUS Side... Using even the simplest of radio setups and antennas, amateurs communicate with each other for fun, during emergencies, and even in contests. They handle messages for police and other public service organizations during all kinds of emergencies including: Hurricanes Earthquakes Tornadoes and floods Motorist accidents Fires and chemical spills Search and rescues

13 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 With a SERIOUS Side...

14 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 Where Do I Start? The rules for earning an Amateur Radio license vary depending on which country you live in. In the US, there are three license levels, or "license classes" (Technician class, General class and Extra Class). These licenses are granted by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

15 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 It's Easy to Get Started The most popular license for beginners is the Technician Class license, which requires only a 35 multiple-choice question written examination. The test is written with the beginner in mind. Morse Code is not required for this license. With a Technician Class license, you will have all ham radio privileges above 30 megahertz (MHz). These privileges include the very popular 2-meter band. Many Technician licensees enjoy using small (2 meter) hand-held radios to stay in touch with other hams in their area. Technicians may operate FM voice, digital packet (computers), television, single-sideband voice and several other interesting modes. You can even make international radio contacts via satellites, using relatively simple equipment.

16 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 Getting started Getting started in Amateur Radio has never been easier. First, locate a radio club in your area. Some radio clubs offer ham radio licensing classes, or they can find a club volunteer to answer your questions. You may even be invited to attend a local radio club meeting.

17 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 license study guides Do you learn best from a manual, a teaching videotape, an in-person course or an on-line course? Which of these choices will fit better into your busy schedule? You can choose what will work best for you because ARRL has it all! ARRL produces popular ham radio license study guides, fast-paced learning videos, and even a brand new on-line course. You'll learn the things you need to pass the license exam and have fun with Amateur Radio.

18 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 FAQ Q: Who are Amateur Radio operators? A: Anyone you know could be an Amateur Radio operator or "ham" --no matter what age, gender or physical ability. From ages 8 to 80, people in many countries of the world can have fun as radio amateurs. If you've had fun with CB radio or trying new things with your computer, wait till you see what you can do with ham radio!

19 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 FAQ Q: What Can I Do With Ham Radio? A: You can communicate from the top of a mountain, your home or behind the wheel of your car. You can take radio wherever you go! In times of disaster, when regular communications channels fail, hams can swing into action assisting emergency communications efforts and working with public service agencies. At other times, you can talk to Shuttle astronauts or bounce signals off the moon. You can use telegraphy, voice, digital, even images in communication with other hams. Know any other hobby with so much to offer?

20 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 FAQ Q: Why Do I need A License? A: Although the main purpose of the hobby is fun, it is called the "Amateur Radio Service" because it also has a serious face. The FCC created the "Service" to fill the need for a pool of experts who could provide backup emergency communications in times of need. In addition, the FCC acknowledged the ability of the hobby to advance communication and technical knowledge, and enhance international goodwill.

21 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 FAQ Q: What will this cost me? A: A basic new handheld radio can cost about the same as an inexpensive 19-inch color TV. Flea market bargains can cost a lot less. A new tabletop multi-band unit for your home radio shack can cost about the same as the PC you're reading this on. Materials to get you started are relatively inexpensive, and the exam fee you'll pay when you're ready to test is nominal.

22 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 FAQ Q: Who can help me out? A: Amateur Radio clubs are located all over the US and are eager to help the newcomer get started. If you prefer to study alone, ARRL publications can be invaluable in helping you find the fast track to on-the-air enjoyment.

23 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 FAQ Q: When was Amateur Radio started? A: Nobody knows when Amateur Radio operators were first called "hams", but we do know that Amateur Radio is as old as the history of radio itself. In 1912, Congress passed the first laws regulating radio transmissions in the US. By 1914, amateur experimenters were communicating nation-wide, and setting up a system to relay messages from coast to coast (that's how we got our name, American Radio Relay League or ARRL, for short.)

24 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 FAQ Q: I don't have a lot of time. Can I still enjoy the hobby? A: You bet! The beauty of ham radio is it can fit the time, space, and budget that YOU decide is right for you. It's got that low stress, high fun ratio that many busy people seek in their off- hours. It can also be great family fun or a solitary pleasure.

25 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 FAQ Q: I want to talk to a real, live ham. Who can I contact? A: The presenter of this slide show or call NEWHAM for more info.

26 By: Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS Copyright 2005 Contact ARRL 225 Main Street Newington, CT ARRL, The national association for Amateur Radio -- Helping Hams Get Started Since ARRL Headquarters is open from 8 AM to 5 PM Eastern time, Monday through Friday, except holidays. You can call us at: –(voice) –(fax)


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