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Raymond McNulty, Senior Vice President, International Center for Leadership in Education March 27, 2008 Mesa, AZ.

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1 Raymond McNulty, Senior Vice President, International Center for Leadership in Education March 27, 2008 Mesa, AZ

2 Identify the essential characteristics of successful schools Best Practices/Research to assist schools Organize into useful tools

3 Why Why What What How How Change Process

4 Not an expert Im a learner and I change my opinion and what I do based on what I learn.

5 Themes 1.General Thoughts 2.Change / Four Megatrends 3.21 st Century Skills 4.Three Questions 5.3 Rs / Participation Gap 6.Learning Criteria 7.Closing Advice 2020

6 General Thoughts

7 The primary aim of education is not to enable students to do well in school, but to help them do well in the lives they lead outside of school.

8 Basic Knowledge/Skills English Language (spoken) Reading Comprehension (in English) Writing in English (grammar, spelling, etc.) Mathematics Science Government/Economics Humanities/Arts Foreign Languages History/Geography Are They Really Ready To Work? Applied Skills Critical Thinking/Problem Solving Oral Communication Written Communication Teamwork/Collaboration Diversity Information Technology Application Leadership Creativity/Innovation Lifelong Learning/Self Direction Professionalism/Work Ethic Ethics/Social Responsibility

9 Weve created false proxies for learning… Finishing a course or textbook has come to mean achievement Listening to lecture has come to mean understanding Getting a high score on a standardized test has come to mean proficiency

10 Learning should have its roots in.. Meaning, not just memory Engagement, not simply transmission Inquiry, not only compliance Exploration, not just acquisition Personalization, not simply uniformity Collaboration, not only competition Trust, not fear

11 Leadership is about action, not position.

12 Educators need to become the agents of change.

13 This is the story about the big public conversation the nation is not having about public education… whether an entire generation of kids will fail to make the grade in the Global Economy because they cant think their way through abstract problems, work in teams, distinguish good information from bad, or speak a language other than English. Time Magazine Dec. 18, 2006

14 A few years ago, we got a wake up call when the 1999 PISA results were published.

15 US 15 Year-Olds Rank Near Middle Of The Pack Among 32 Participating Countries: 1999

16 The new ones?

17 PISA 2003: US 15 Year-Olds Rank Near The End Of The Pack Among 29 OECD Countries Source: NCES, 2005, International Outcomes of Learning in Mathematics, Literacy and Problem Solving: 2003 PISA Results. NCES

18 Problems are not limited to our high-poverty and high-minority schools...

19 U.S. Ranks Low in the Percent of Students in the Highest Achievement Level (Level 6) in Math Source: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), PISA 2003 Results, data available at

20 U.S. Ranks 23 rd out of 29 OECD Countries in the Math Achievement of the Highest- Performing Students* * Students at the 95 th Percentile Source: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), PISA 2003 Results, data available at

21 U.S. Ranks 23 rd out of 29 OECD Countries in the Math Achievement of High-SES Students Source: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), PISA 2003 Results, data available at

22 BANKING Sears IBM Digital…. In Search of Excellence Xerox

23 What got us to where we are today in education, will not get us to where we need to be!

24 Change / Four Megatrends

25 THE IMPLEMENTATION DIP…. THE POSSIBILITY CURVE.. Fullan

26 Challenges Globalization Demographics Values / Beliefs Technology

27 Globalization 9/11 11/9 Information Tech (Work to Worker)

28 Globalization Tax Returns MRIs Reuters McDonalds A- Level

29 Computer Sales Dell Sony Compaq HP IBM Think Pad Apple NEC Gateway Toshiba Quanta Wispron Asustek Compal Inventec Computer Manufacturers Mainland China Companies 90 %

30 China Clothes / Shoes Furniture Consumer Electronics Computers Bio Technology

31 Cities with 1 Million People United States Eastern / Western Europe China (2006) China (2020)

32 2007 – World Economic Leaders 1. United States 2. Japan 3. England 4. Germany Source: Goldman Sacks

33 2040 – World Economic Leaders 1. China 2. India 3. United States 4. Mexico 5. Russia 6. Brazil 7. Germany 8. England Source: Goldman Sacks

34 16th Spain 17th Netherlands 18th France 19th Britain 20th USA 21st ???no one country will ever again be the dominant focus of the entire century.

35 Challenges Globalization Demographics Values / Beliefs Technology

36 Start Working End Working Longevity

37 Over Million Million Million

38 2000 Population U.S.28.3 %21.0 % India43.7 %12.2 % 1955

39 / 100 Demographics / Economic / – 1.8 / 100

40 Registered Voters School Age Children % %

41 Redefining the Idea of Age Age 40 = 30 Age 50 = 40 Age 65 = beginning of second half of life WOOFS = Well Off Older Folks

42 Challenges Globalization Demographics Values / Beliefs Technology

43 Larger Context 1901 – 24G.I – 42Silent 1943 – 60Boomers 1961 – 81Gen X Millennial

44 Percent Minority G.I.14.3 % Silent19.9 % Boomers25.5 % Gen X36.2 % Millennial40.3 %

45 Millennial Parents Accountability Protective Connected 24 / 7 Cool to be Smart Team Skills Cool to Know Technology

46 Challenges Globalization Demographics Values / Beliefs Technology

47 Information Technology Processing Processing Communications Communications

48 Nano Technology Atom Up Atom Up

49 Image source:

50 Image source:

51 SPOT MicrosoftMicrosoft –Citizen –Fossil –Suunco

52 SPOT Integrated ProjectionIntegrated Projection Projection KeyboardProjection Keyboard

53 Projection Keyboard

54

55 Projection Keyboard and Projector

56 World Wide Web

57 Google ,000 searches a day 20061,000,000,000 searches a day Source: Thomas l. Friedman

58 Semantic Web

59 Analyze Documents Analyze Documents Key words and headers Key words and headers Meaning/concepts Meaning/concepts Complete Task Complete Task

60 Information Systems Hardware Tools Capacity

61 Grid Computing

62 Semantic Web 1980s: internetworking protocols link computers (Internet) 1990s: hypertext transfer protocollink documents (WWW) 2000s: grid protocols link databases (Grid computing)

63 Language Translation

64 Translation Goggles

65 Keyboard

66 Qwerty Keyboard

67 Dvorak Keyboard

68 Info Tech Nano Tech Bio Tech 2000

69 Info Tech Nano Tech Bio Tech 2006

70 Info Tech Nano Tech Bio Tech 2010

71 Bio / Nano / Info Capacity Applications Size

72 Bio-Info Cell Cell DNA DNA HardwareSoftware

73 Genetically Engineered Foods Tomato

74 The Last Remnants of Industrial Age Government Schools

75 Three Question Exercise 1.What will the world be like 20 years from now? 2.What skills will your child need to be successful in that world? 3.What would learning look like if it was designed around your answers?

76 Education exists in the larger context of society.

77 When society changes – so too must education if it is to remain viable!

78 Web pages Google iPODs Laptops Digital cameras Doppler radar Cell Phones Debit cards

79 Blogs Wikis Tagging Text messaging MySpace Podcasts PDAs Genetic code

80

81 Children Aged 8-14 Help Parents Online… /pictures – 38% Respond to correspondence – 36% Get directions – 35% Help file income tax online – 14%

82 21 st Century Learners Digital Native Learners Multitasking Multimedia learning Multimedia learning Online social networking Online social networking Online info searching Online info searching Games, simulations & creative expressions Games, simulations & creative expressions

83 21 st Century Skills

84 Agricultural Age… Farmers Industrial Age… Factory Worker Informational Age… Knowledge Worker Conceptual Age… Creator / Empathizer

85 Three reasons for this… Abundance Asia Automation

86 #1 Abundance Malls, Target, PetsMart, Best Buy, Homes, Cars Self Storage Trash …. USA spends more on trash bags than 90 countries spend on everything

87 Abundance has produced an ironic result… Lessened the significance of things because you can get it anywhere. (no longer enough to create a product thats reasonably priced and functional) Products must be more R – Directed beautiful, unique, meaningful, aesthetic imperative

88 Abundance Elevates R – Directed Thinking Electric lighting was rare a century ago… Today it is commonplace and abundant. Yet…. Candles who needs them anymore? $2.4 billion business a year

89 #2 ASIA Knowledge workers new competition.. India, Philippines, China Programmers 70k – 80k are paid what a Taco Bell worker makes Chip designers 7k in USA …..1K in India Aerospace Engineers USA 6K… $650 in Russia Accountant USA 5K… $300 in Philippines

90 #3 Automation Last century machines proved they could replace human backs This century new technologies are proving they can replace human left brains Any job that depends on routines is at risk. Automation is changing even doctors work. Outsource.com

91 Left hemisphere is sequential, logical and analytical. The Left powered the Information Age. Still necessary, but no longer sufficient. Right hemisphere is non linear, intuitive and holistic. The Right qualities of inventiveness, empathy, joyfulness and meaning will power the Conceptual Age.

92 A new age valuing…. High Concept: the capacity to detect patterns / opportunities to create, to be artistic / emotional beauty and to combine seemingly unrelated ideas into something new. High Touch: involves the ability to empathize with others, understand the subtleties of human interaction to find joy and elicit it in others

93 High Concept / High Touch GMs top leader… I see us being in the art business. MBAs becoming the blue collar workers for the conceptual age. Graphic designers have increased ten fold in the last decade. Since 1970, 30% more people are earning a living as writers. More Americans today work in art, entertainment and design than as lawyers, accountants and auditors.

94 The future belongs to a very different kind of mind.. Creators and empathizers Pattern recognizers Meaning makers And more……….

95

96 21 st Century Skills Learning & Innovation Skills –Creativity & Innovation –Critical Thinking & Problem-solving –Communication & Collaboration Information, Media & Technology Skills –Information Literacy –Media Literacy –ICT Literacy Life & Career Skills –Flexibility & Adaptability –Initiative & Self-direction –Social & Cross-cultural Skills –Productivity & Accountability –Leadership & Responsibility

97 End Morning Session

98 Three Question Exercise 1.What will the world be like 20 years from now? 2.What skills will your child need to be successful in that world? 3.What would learning look like if it was designed around your answers?

99 The 3 Rs

100 Rigor Relevance Relationships

101 Rigor/Relevance Framework

102 R&R Framework... A Useful Tool to evaluate Curriculum Instruction Assessment Activities

103 1.Awareness 2.Comprehension 3.Application 4.Analysis 5.Synthesis 6.Evaluation Knowledge Taxonomy Knowledge Taxonomy

104 Knowledge Taxonomy 6Evaluate spending habits of spouse 1Identify money 2Explain values 5Set goals based on budget 4Match expenses to budget 3Buy something within budget Managing Resources

105 Application Model Application Model 1. Knowledge in one discipline 2. Application within discipline 3. Application across disciplines 4.Application to real-world predictable situations 5.Application to real-world unpredictable situations

106 Managing Resources 1Know money values 2Solve word problems 3Relate wealth to quality of life 4Prepare budget 5Handle lottery winnings Application Model

107 KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE A P P L I C A T I O N A B D C Rigor/Relevance Framework

108

109 KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE A P P L I C A T I O N A B D C Rigor/Relevance Framework Teacher Work Teacher/Student Roles Student Think Student Think & Work Student Work

110 KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE A P P L I C A T I O N Extended Response Extended Response Product Performance Product Performance Primary Assessments Rigor/Relevance Framework Portfolio Portfolio Product Performance Product Performance Interview Interview Self Reflection Self Reflection Process Process Performance Performance Product Performance Product Performance Multiple Choice Multiple Choice Constructed Response Constructed Response

111 American Education RigorRigor S t u d e n t s 2007 and Beyond

112 KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE A P P L I C A T I O N A B D C Rigor/Relevance Framework Activities Projects Problems

113 Strategies Brainstorming Brainstorming Cooperative Learning Cooperative Learning Demonstration Demonstration Guided Practice Guided Practice Inquiry Inquiry Instructional Technology Instructional Technology Lecture Lecture Note-taking/Graphic Organizers Note-taking/Graphic Organizers Memorization Memorization Presentations/Exhibitions Presentations/Exhibitions Research Research Problem-based learning Problem-based learning Project Design Project Design Simulation/Role-playing Simulation/Role-playing Socratic Seminar Socratic Seminar Teacher Questions Teacher Questions Work-based Learning Work-based Learning

114 Selecting Strategies on Rigor/Relevance Guided Practice Guided Practice Lecture Lecture Memorization Memorization Best Strategies for Quadrant A - Acquisition

115 Cooperative Learning Cooperative Learning Demonstration Demonstration Instructional Technology Instructional Technology Problem-based Learning Problem-based Learning Project Design Project Design Simulation/Role Playing Simulation/Role Playing Work-based Learning Work-based Learning Selecting Strategies on Rigor/Relevance Best Strategies for Quadrant B - Application

116 Brainstorming Brainstorming Inquiry Inquiry Instructional Technology Instructional Technology Research Research Socratic Seminar Socratic Seminar Teacher Questions Teacher Questions Selecting Strategies on Rigor/Relevance Best Strategies for Quadrant C - Assimilation

117 Brainstorming Brainstorming Cooperative Learning Cooperative Learning Inquiry Inquiry Instructional Technology Instructional Technology Presentations/ Exhibitions Presentations/ Exhibitions Problem-based Learning Problem-based Learning Project Design Project Design Research Research Simulation/Role-playing Simulation/Role-playing Socratic Seminar Socratic Seminar Teacher Questions Teacher Questions Work-based Learning Work-based Learning Selecting Strategies on Rigor/Relevance Best Strategies for Quadrant D - Adaptation

118 Selection of Strategies Based on Rigor/ Relevance Framework

119 Rigor Relevance Relationships

120 Relevance Relationships Rigor

121 Relationships Relevance Rigor

122 R X R X R = LCWRS Relationships X Relevance X Rigor = Life, College, Work Ready Students

123 It is virtually impossible to make things relevant for, or expect personal excellence from a student you dont know. Carol Ann Tomlinson

124 You cant teach kids you dont know….

125 KEY ISSUE In many cases, hard data is the total focus at the exclusion of soft data. This is often a short-term fix but a long-term mistake!!!!!

126 RIGORRIGOR RELEVANCE A B D C Increasing Rigor/Relevance High Low

127 B D C A RIGORRIGOR RELEVANCE Rigor/Relevance Framework High Low Relationships Relationships of Little Importance Relationships Essential Relationships Important Relationships Important

128 Achievement Gap Participation Gap

129 Participation Gap Self-Worth: Self-Worth occurs when students know they are valued members of the community; have a person they can trust; believe they can achieve. Active Engagement: Active Engagement happens when students are deeply involved in the learning process. Purpose: Purpose exits when students take responsibility for who and what they want to become.

130 The Aspirations Profile: Understanding our students better

131 Aspirations: the ability to dream and set goals for the future, while being inspired in the present to reach those dreams.

132 STUDENT ASPIRATIONS / PARTICIPATION GAP SELF WORTH ACTIVE ENGAGEMENT PURPOSE Belonging Heroes Sense of Accomplishment Fun & Excitement Curiosity & Creativity Spirit of Adventure Leadership & Responsibility Confidence to Take Action Relationships Relevance Rigor

133 SELF WORTH Belonging Heroes Sense of Accomplishment STATEMENT 54%49%I am proud of my school. 49%49%I enjoy being at school. 58%41%Teachers care about my problems and feelings. 54%46%Teachers care about me as an individual. 50%45%Teachers care if I am absent from school. 19%21%I have never been recognized for something positive at school. 52%48%If I have a problem, I have a teacher with whom I can talk. 68%51%Teachers respect students. 49%37%Students respect teachers. 36%29%Students respect each other. NATIONAL DATA Copyright 2008 Quaglia Institute

134 STATEMENT 42%48%School is boring. 68%55%At school I am encouraged to be creative. 47%37%My classes help me understand what is happening in my everyday life. 67%54%Teachers enjoy working with students 47%37%Teachers have fun at school. 41%28%Teachers make school an exciting place to learn. 79%71%My teachers present lessons in different ways. ACTIVE ENGAGEMENT Fun & Excitement Curiosity & Creativity Spirit of Adventure NATIONAL DATA Copyright 2008 Quaglia Institute

135 STATEMENT 62%64%I am a good decision maker. 54% 59%I see myself as a leader. 30% 35%Other students see me as a leader. 91%91%I believe I can be successful. 80%77%Teachers expect me to be successful. 58%64%I believe I can make a difference in this world. 79%66%I put forth my best effort at school. 44%36%I know the goals my school is working on. 41%30%Students council represents all students at school. PURPOSE Leadership & Responsibility Confidence to Take Action NATIONAL DATA Copyright 2008 Quaglia Institute

136 I am proud of my school.T = 85 S = 50 I am excited to be working with students.T = 96 Teachers enjoy working with students.S = 56 Students have fun at school.T = 78 School is boring.S = 47 Students make school an exciting place to work.T = 87 Teachers make school an exciting place to learn.S = 31 I have fun at school.T = 85 Teachers have fun at school.S = 39 Students care if I am absent from school.T = 78 Teachers care if I am absent from school.S = 46 I enjoy working here.T = 88 I enjoy being at school.S = 50 NATIONAL DATA Delusional Discrepancies Copyright 2008 Quaglia Institute

137 I am excited to tell my colleagues when I do something well.T = 59 I am excited to tell my friends when I get good grades.S = 57 I see myself as a leader.T = 75 S = 58 My colleagues see me as a leader.T = 50 Other students see me as a leader.S = 34 I feel comfortable asking questions in staff meetings.T = 66 I feel comfortable asking questions in class. S = 66 NATIONAL DATA Sad Similarities Copyright 2008 Quaglia Institute

138 Remember this….. Using only achievement data as the total focus of your plan to improve learning is a mistake. The inclusion of culture/climate data, sometimes referred to as soft data, helps build sustainable long term results.

139 The Learning Criteria

140 Made to Stick by Chip and Dan Heath Made to Stick by Chip and Dan Heath

141 Six Principles Simplicity Unexpectedness Concreteness Credibility Emotions Stories

142 Focus On Simplicity Finding the essential core of our ideas? COMMANDERS INTENT.. No Plan survives contact with the enemy! …Like writing a plan to have your friend play chess for you……. Southwest Airlines Commanders Intent We Are the Low-Fare Airline

143 The Curse of Knowledge It can feel unnatural to speak concretely about a subject matter we know so much about…… Tappers and Listeners

144 Arizonia Commanders Intent Develop and implement school plans to support and enhance 21 st Century Teaching & Learning

145 How do you want learning evaluated?

146 The video of the movie Star Wars earned $193,500,000 in rental fees during its first year. Expressed in scientific notation, the number of dollars earned is: (1)1935 x 10 8 (3) x 10 6 (2) x 10 6 (4) x 10 8

147 (4) x 10 8

148 The Learning Criteria helps you put into action what you believe about learning.

149 Evaluation Systems Many of our systems are incomplete because we over measure some things and not measure enough of others.

150 Success Beyond the Test Core Academics Stretch Learning Student Engagement Personal Skill Development Rigor Relevance Relationships

151 Core Stretch Learner Engagement Personal Skill Development

152 Core Stretch Learner Engagement Personal Skill Development Dimensions of the Learning Criteria

153 Learning Criteria to Support Rigor, Relevance & Relationships Every school has its own DNA. School success is measurable beyond the tests. Data must drive school improvement initiatives. School growth and continuous improvement is an ongoing, collaborative process. International Center for Leadership in Education, Inc.

154 The Learning Criteria to Support 21st Century Learners ©

155 Dimensions Core Academic Learning (Achievement in the core subjects of English language arts, math and science and others identified by the school)

156 Begin with the End in Mind CORE Minimal Learning Rigor Relevance Engagement Does Help

157 K8 Core Academic Learning Sample Data Indicators Percentage of students meeting proficiency level of state testing requirements (required) Achievement levels on standardized tests/assessments other than state exams [e.g., Lexile, DRAs (Developmental Reading Assessment), STAR, Scholastic Reading Inventory, etc.] Percentage of performance-based assessments aligned with state and district standards used in reading, math, writing, and science (portfolio development, student-led conferencing, etc.) Percentage of students requiring remediation (summer school or tutorial) in reading, mathematics Follow-up surveys of academic achievements of students as they move to middle school/high school

158 9-12 Core Academic Learning Sample Data Indicators Percentage of students meeting proficiency level on state tests (required) Average scores on ACT/SAT/PSAT Achievement levels on standardized tests other than state exams Percentage of students requiring English/math remediation in college Percent of students graduating high school in four years

159 Core Learning Student Outcomes School Performance SustainedDisaggregated Benchmarked (Target)

160 Core Academic Learning (Achievement in the core subjects of English language arts, math and science and others identified by the school) Stretch Learning (Demonstration of rigorous and relevant learning beyond the minimum requirements) Dimensions

161 Begin with the End in Mind STRETCH Strong Rigor Strong Relevance Engagement Helps

162 Penn Foster Virtual High School Credit Recovery Increase Graduation Rates Decrease Dropout Rates Career Training Programs For more information please call Don Kidd at or

163 K8 Stretch Learning Sample Data Indicators Students make more than one years growth in literacy Interdisciplinary work and projects (problem based learning) Students reading at least 60% non-fiction each day and using research-based comprehension Students participate in daily enrichment courses (music, art, physical education, foreign language, etc.) Completion of three or more years of world language before grade 6 Number of students enrolled in choice based academic explorations such as electives, clubs, independent studies, expert groupings, etc. Number of students involved in self-regulated learning opportunities such as peer coaching, student-led conferencing, student and teacher data notebooks, peer data conferencing, etc.

164 9-12 Stretch Learning Sample Data Indicators Interdisciplinary work and projects (e.g., senior exhibition) Participation/test scores in International Baccalaureate courses Average number of college credits earned by graduation (dual enrollment) Enrollment in AP courses/scores on AP exams/percentage achieving >2 (online) Percent of students completing career majors or career/technical education programs Four or more credits in a career area (online) Four or more credits in arts (online) Achievement of specialized certificates (e.g., Microsoft, Cisco Academy) (online)

165 Stretch Learning Student Outcomes School Performance SustainedDisaggregated Benchmarked (Target)

166 Criteria Core Academic Learning (Achievement in the core subjects of English language arts, math and science and others identified by the school) Stretch Learning (Demonstration of rigorous and relevant learning beyond the minimum requirements) Personal Skill Development (Measures of personal, social, service, and leadership skills and demonstrations of positive behaviors and attitudes)

167 Begin with the End in Mind PERSONAL SKILL DEVELOPMENT Total Learning Embedded throughout curriculum

168 K8 Personal Skill Development Sample Data Indicators Participation or hours in service learning Students holding leadership position in clubs, classrooms, or sports Time management Ability to plan and organize work Respect for diversity Reduction in number of student incidences of conflict Follow-up survey of middle school students on development of personal skills

169 9-12 Personal Skill Development Sample Data Indicators Participation or hours in service learning Students holding leadership positions in clubs or sports Assessment of personal skills: time management, ability to plan and organize work, leadership/followership, etc. Respect for diversity Work as a member of a team Trustworthiness, perseverance, other character traits Follow-up survey of graduates on development of personal skills

170 Personal Skill Development Student Outcomes School Performance SustainedDisaggregated Benchmarked (Target)

171 Criteria Core Academic Learning (Achievement in the core subjects of English language arts, math and science and others identified by the school) Stretch Learning (Demonstration of rigorous and relevant learning beyond the minimum requirements) Personal Skill Development (Measures of personal, social, service, and leadership skills and demonstrations of positive behaviors and attitudes) Learner Engagement (The extent to which students are motivated and committed to learning; have a sense of belonging and accomplishment; and have relationships with adults, peers, and parents that support learning)

172 Begin with the End in Mind LEARNER ENGAGEMENT Relationships important Life long learner Enhances other three categories

173 K8 Learner Engagement Sample Data Indicators Student satisfaction surveys Student risk behaviors (Asset Survey) Attendance rate Discipline referrals Tardiness Student participation in classroom and school leadership (Junior Leadership Team, etc.)

174 9-12 Learner Engagement Sample Data Indicators Student satisfaction surveys Student risk behaviors (asset survey) Attendance rate Participation rate in extracurricular activities % of students taking ACT/SAT Tardiness rate % of students going to two and four year colleges

175 Learner Engagement Student Outcomes School Performance SustainedDisaggregated Benchmarked (Target)

176 Themes 1.General Thoughts 2.Change / Four Megatrends 3.21 st Century Skills 4.Three Questions 5.3 Rs / Participation Gap 6.Learning Criteria 7.Closing Advice

177 We can complain about the troubling inadequacies of the present ----

178 or we can face them.

179 We can talk and dream about the glorious schools of the future ---

180 OR WE CAN CREATE THEM!

181 International Center for Leadership in Education, Inc Route 146 Rexford, NY Phone (518) Fax (518) – PowerPoint -


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