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International Center for Leadership in Education

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Presentation on theme: "International Center for Leadership in Education"— Presentation transcript:

1 International Center for Leadership in Education
Teaching and Learning in the 21st Century May 30, 2007 Dr. Willard R. Daggett International Center for Leadership in Education

2 Skills Gap

3 Change Process Why What How

4 Application Model 1. Knowledge in one discipline
2. Application within discipline 3. Application across disciplines 4. Application to real-world predictable situations 5. Application to real-world unpredictable situations

5 Rigor/Relevance For All Students

6 Knowledge Taxonomy 1. Awareness 2. Comprehension 3. Application
4. Analysis 5. Synthesis 6. Evaluation

7 Application Model 1. Knowledge in one discipline
2. Application within discipline 3. Application across disciplines 4. Application to real-world predictable situations 5. Application to real-world unpredictable situations

8 Rigor/Relevance Framework
Knowledge 1 2 3 4 5 6 Application 1 2 3 4 5

9 Levels Bloom’s C D A B 6 5 4 3 2 1 Application

10 D C B A Rigor/Relevance Framework 6 5 4 3 2 1 1 2 3 4 5
Obtain historical data about local weather to predict the chance of snow, rain, or sun during year. Test consumer products and illustrate the data graphically. Plan a large school event and calculate resources (food, decorations, etc.) you need to organize and hold this event. Make a scale drawing of the classroom on grid paper, each group using a different scale. Analyze the graphs of the perimeters and areas of squares having different-length sides. Determine the largest rectangular area for a fixed perimeter. Identify coordinates for ordered pairs that satisfy an algebraic relation or function. Determine and justify the similarity or congruence for two geometric shapes. D C 5 4 3 Calculate percentages of advertising in a newspaper. Tour the school building and identify examples of parallel and perpendicular lines, planes, and angles. Determine the median and mode of real data displayed in a histogram Organize and display collected data, using appropriate tables, charts, or graphs. Express probabilities as fractions, percents, or decimals. Classify triangles according to angle size and/or length of sides. Calculate volume of simple three- dimensional shapes. Given the coordinates of a quadrilateral, plot the quadrilateral on a grid. 2 A B 1 1 2 3 4 5

11 D C B A Rigor/Relevance Framework 6 5 4 3 2 1 1 2 3 4 5
Obtain historical data about local weather to predict the chance of snow, rain, or sun during year. Test consumer products and illustrate the data graphically. Plan a large school event and calculate resources (food, decorations, etc.) you need to organize and hold this event. Make a scale drawing of the classroom on grid paper, each group using a different scale. Analyze the graphs of the perimeters and areas of squares having different-length sides. Determine the largest rectangular area for a fixed perimeter. Identify coordinates for ordered pairs that satisfy an algebraic relation or function. Determine and justify the similarity or congruence for two geometric shapes. D Express probabilities as fractions, percents, or decimals. Classify triangles according to angle size and/or length of sides. Calculate volume of simple three- dimensional shapes. Given the coordinates of a quadrilateral, plot the quadrilateral on a grid. C 5 4 3 Calculate percentages of advertising in a newspaper. Tour the school building and identify examples of parallel and perpendicular lines, planes, and angles. Determine the median and mode of real data displayed in a histogram Organize and display collected data, using appropriate tables, charts, or graphs. 2 A B 1 1 2 3 4 5

12 D C B A Rigor/Relevance Framework 6 5 4 3 2 1 1 2 3 4 5
Obtain historical data about local weather to predict the chance of snow, rain, or sun during year. Test consumer products and illustrate the data graphically. Plan a large school event and calculate resources (food, decorations, etc.) you need to organize and hold this event. Make a scale drawing of the classroom on grid paper, each group using a different scale. Analyze the graphs of the perimeters and areas of squares having different-length sides. Determine the largest rectangular area for a fixed perimeter. Identify coordinates for ordered pairs that satisfy an algebraic relation or function. Determine and justify the similarity or congruence for two geometric shapes. Calculate percentages of advertising in a newspaper. Tour the school building and identify examples of parallel and perpendicular lines, planes, and angles. Determine the median and mode of real data displayed in a histogram Organize and display collected data, using appropriate tables, charts, or graphs. D C 5 4 3 Express probabilities as fractions, percents, or decimals. Classify triangles according to angle size and/or length of sides. Calculate volume of simple three- dimensional shapes. Given the coordinates of a quadrilateral, plot the quadrilateral on a grid. 2 A B 1 1 2 3 4 5

13 Levels Bloom’s C D A B 6 5 4 3 2 1 Application

14 Change Process Why What How

15 Input Process Output Success in Changing World The Students are
Different Schools

16 Input The Students are Different

17 Research Donald Roberts - Stanford
Jordan Grafman – National Institute of Neurological Disorders Hal Pashler – University of California Cheryl Grady – Rothman Research Center, Toronto David Meyer – University of Michigan Claudia Knooz – Duke

18 Multitasking Toggling Prefrontal Cortex Pew Research

19 Today’s Youth Digital Learners Multimedia Find and manipulate data
Analyze data and images

20

21 Kids Multitask 65% do other things while doing homework
Source: Kaiser Research

22 Millennial-oriented Technology
Blogs Wikis Tagging Instant Messaging MySpace Podcasts

23 Input Process Output Success in Changing World The Students are
Different Schools

24 Challenges Technology

25 Info Tech Computers will become faster.

26 Central Units’ Memory = 8 MB
1964 IBM System / 360 Mainframe Central Units’ Memory = 8 MB 2004 iPod = 4 GB 2005 iPod = 20 GB 2006 iPod = 80 GB

27 Image source: www.dell.com

28 Image source: http://robota.dem.uc.pt/pda_control/pda2.JPG

29 Information Technology
Processing Communications

30 Nano Technology Atom Up

31 SPOT Microsoft Citizen Fossil Suunco

32 SPOT Integrated Projection Projection Keyboard

33 Projection Keyboard

34 Projection Keyboard and Projector

35 Language Translation

36 Translation Goggles

37 Do You... Print to edit? See Web site vs. URL Print your ?

38 SMS (Short Message Service)
A New Language SMS (Short Message Service) Text Messaging 160 characters maximum

39 SMS Text Lingo "G2G" (got to go) “LOL" (laugh out loud) "WL" (will)
"BTW" (by the way) "AFAIK" (as far as I know) "W" (what?) "PXT" (please explain that)

40 This will look weird! Believe it or not, you can read it!
I cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdgnieg. The phaonmneal power of the hmuan mnid Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn’t mttaer. Inwaht oredr the ltteers in a word are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is that the frist and lsat ltteer be in the rghit pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you can still raed it wouthit a porbelm. This is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the word as a wlohe. Amzaning huh? Yeah and I awlyas thought slpeling was ipmorantt!

41 I hOp U njoy d Conference.
I hope you enjoy the Conference.

42 Equity & excellence R n conflict w 1 NothA.
Equity and excellence are in conflict with one another.

43 f U cn rED DIS 1 yor txt msg skiLz R XLNT.
If you can read this one your text message skills are excellent.

44 BTW, SOL U WL problE hav 2 Lern d lingo
BTW, SOL U WL problE hav 2 Lern d lingo. othRwIz U wiL hav knO idea wot yor students R sAN 2 1 NothA Bhind yor bak. By the way, sooner or later you will probably have to learn the lingo. Otherwise you will have know idea what your students are saying to one another behind your back.

45 New Literacy Document Quantitative Technological

46 Levels Bloom’s C D A B 6 5 4 3 2 1 Application

47 Bio Tech Medicine will cure more diseases.

48 Nano Tech Materials will become stronger.

49 The Future of Technology
Computers will become faster. Materials will become stronger. Medicine will cure more diseases.

50 Challenges Technology Globalization

51 Globalization 9/11 11/9 Information Tech (Work to Worker)

52 Most Advanced Nation Needs Most Competitive Workforce

53 Cities with 1 Million People
United States Eastern / Western Europe China (2006) China (2020) 9 36 100 + 160 +

54 Challenges Technology Globalization Demographics

55 Gender Gap Male Female Special Education 70 % 30 % B. A. 43 % 57 %
Masters % %

56 Start Working End Working Longevity
107 77 62 62 47 21 14 18 1900 2000 2100

57 Demographics / Economic
1910 3.0 / 100 1946 4.6 / 100 2000 1.4 – 1.8 / 100

58 55 is not an economically sustainable policy
Retirement 55 is not an economically sustainable policy

59 Percent of Population Over Age 65
Gordon, Edward E. (2005). The 2010 Meltdown. Praeger.

60 Challenges Technology Globalization Demographics Values / Beliefs

61 Larger Context 1901 – 24 G.I. 1925 – 45 Silent 1946 – 60 Boomers
1961 – 81 Gen X Millennial

62 Change Process Why What How

63 Essential Skills

64 Levels Bloom’s C D A B 6 5 4 3 2 1 Application

65 Interquartile Ranges Shown (25% - 75%)
Lexile Framework® for Reading Study Summary of Text Lexile Measures Interquartile Ranges Shown (25% - 75%) 1600 1400 1200 Text Lexile Measure (L) 1000 800 600 High School Literature College Literature High School Textbooks College Textbooks Military Personal Use Entry-Level Occupations SAT 1, ACT, AP* * Source of National Test Data: MetaMetrics

66 16 Career Clusters Department of Education

67 Reading Requirements Findings
Entry-level Highest in 6/16 Second Highest in 7/16 Consistent Across Country

68 Human Services

69 Construction

70 Manufacturing

71 On-the Job Lexile Requirements
National Adult Literacy Study 1992 1,500 1,400 1,300 1,200 1,100 1,000 900 800 International Center for Leadership in Education 2006 Construction Craftsman Nurse Sales Secretary

72 Levels Bloom’s C D A B 6 5 4 3 2 1 Application

73 Change Process Why What How

74 Levels Bloom’s C D A B 6 5 4 3 2 1 Application

75 Data

76 AIMS English LA - Reading Performance Objectives Tested

77 Arizona Arts Education
Arizona English Language Arts Standards/Benchmarks/ Performance Objectives Grade 8 AIMS Test Visual Arts Dance Music Theatre PO 1. Determine the meaning of vocabulary using linguistic roots and affixes (e.g., Greek, Anglo-Saxon, Latin). M H PO 2. Use context to identify the intended meaning of unfamiliar words (e.g., definition, example, restatement, synonym, contrast). PO 3. Use context to identify the meaning of words with multiple meanings (e.g., definition, example, restatement, or contrast). PO 4. Determine the meaning of figurative language, including similes, metaphors, personification, idioms, hyperbole, and technical language. PO 5. Identify the meanings, pronunciations, syllabication, synonyms, antonyms, and parts of speech of words, by using a variety of reference aids, including dictionaries, thesauri, glossaries, and CD-ROM and the Internet when available. PO 1. Read from a variety of genres with accuracy, automaticity (immediate recognition), and prosody (expression). L

78 Arizona English Language Arts Strands/Standards/Concepts/
Performance Objectives Grade 10 Curriculum Survey of National Rankings Essential Skills AIMS Agriculture & Natural Resources Architecture & Construction Arts, AV Tech & Communications Ag Production Ag Services (Ag Business) Ag Mechanics Natural Architecture Surveying & Drafting Visual Arts & Design Performing Arts PO 3. Determine how the meaning of the text is affected by the writer’s word choice (e.g., literal vs. figurative language, idioms, adages). e80 M L H PO 1. Predict text content using prior knowledge and text features (e.g., illustrations, titles, topic sentences, key words). e52 PO 2. Generate clarifying questions in order to comprehend text. e59 e75 PO 3. Use graphic organizers in order to clarify the meaning of the text. e40 PO 5. Apply knowledge of organizational structures (e.g., chronological order, sequence-time order, cause and effect relationships, logical order, by classification, problem-solution) of text to aid comprehension. PO 1. Compare (and contrast) original text to a summary for accuracy of the main ideas, inclusion of critical details, and the extent to which it conveys the underlying meaning of the original text. e38 e39 e44 PO 2. Distinguish supported inferences from unsupported inferences in expository selections such as editorials, newspaper articles, essays, reviews, and critiques. e17 e18 e34 e53

79 Instruction - Structure

80 Curriculum Alignment: The Reality
Grade 9 Social Studies Grade 9 ELA Grade 9 Science Grade 9 Math Grade 10 Science Grade 10 Social Studies Grade 10 ELA Grade 10 Math Grade 11 Science Grade 11 ELA Grade 11 Math Grade 11 Social Studies Grade 12 Science Grade 12 ELA NOTES: In many schools and districts, this is the reality of what the HS curriculum looks like. Each teacher is creating his or her own curriculum, based on his or her own understanding of what students need, with no sense of where a previous course should have left off or the next course needs to pick up. In some lucky schools, an academic department may meet together to create a coherent vertical plan. Rarely is that plan integrated with anyone else’s. And rarely are the curriculum materials constructed tightly enough to ensure that teachers of a particular course are doing more than keeping pace with each other and “covering” similar topics. This creates lots of overlapping and lots of gaps, creating for students quite a lot of chaos. When you add to this picture the reality that students enter HS behind where they should be, in terms of both skills and content knowledge, the low test scores and high dropout rates we see make a lot more sense. Grade 12 Social Studies Grade 12 Math

81 Curriculum Alignment: The Goal
Grade 9 ELA Math Science Social Studies Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12 NOTES: Obviously, this is what we would all like a school’s program to look like. Coherence from year to year within one subject area, and shared understandings and expectations across subject areas. School looks and feels to students like one thing, rather than a hundred things. They feel as though they are on a clearly thought-through pathway leading them from middle school to independence. They know that they cannot play one teacher off another. They do not have to worry about whether they got the “hard” teacher for a particular course. Can curriculum solve all of the problems in a school? Hardly. But an increase in the sense of coherence, of planned-ness, of school being a single thing instead of a hundred individual things—this can certainly have an effect on the school climate at large.

82 Technology

83

84 Transition Years

85 Start with Hardest to Serve Students

86 Leadership

87 Comprehensive Plan

88 Model Schools Conference June 30 – July 3, 2007 Washington D.C.

89 International Center for Leadership in Education, Inc.
1587 Route 146 Rexford, NY Phone (518) Fax (518) -


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