Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

1 1.Symbols 2.History 3.Major Cities 4.Geography 5.Attractions Click here to see the show. Click here to take the quiz.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "1 1.Symbols 2.History 3.Major Cities 4.Geography 5.Attractions Click here to see the show. Click here to take the quiz."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 1 1.Symbols 2.History 3.Major Cities 4.Geography 5.Attractions Click here to see the show. Click here to take the quiz.

3 2 Song Flower Bird Flag Reptile Amphibian Seal Fish Quarter Mammal Click on a topic to get more information. Click here to advance to beyond State Symbols. advance Fossil Gemstone Did you know the states official colors are blue and gold?

4 3 The 13 rays of red and gold on the top half of the flag represent both the 13 original colonies of the Union, and the rays of the Western setting sun. Red and gold were also the colors carried by Coronado's Spanish expedition in search of the Seven Cities of Cibola in The bottom half of the flag has the same Liberty blue as the United States flag. Since Arizona was the largest producer of copper in the nation, a copper star was placed in the flag's center Click here to return to the previous slide.

5 4 "Arizona" by Rex Allen, Jr. I love you, Arizona; Your mountains, deserts and streams; The rise of Dos Cabezas* And the outlaws I see in my dreams; I love you Arizona, Superstitions and all; The warmth you give at sunrise; Your sunsets put music in us all. Oo, Arizona; You're the magic in me; Oo, Arizona, You're the life-blood of me; I love you Arizona; Desert dust on the wind; The sage and cactus are blooming, And the smell of the rain on your skin. Oo, Arizona; You're the magic in me; Oo, Arizona, You're the life-blood of me; Copyright 1981 by Boxer Music, Nashville, TN Click here to return to the previous slide.

6 5 The official seal of Arizona displays the state's main enterprises and attractions. Arizona's state seal is in black and white and features a background mountain range with the sun rising behind the peaks, a storage reservoir (lake) and a dam, irrigated fields and orchards, grazing cattle, and a quartz mill with a miner holding a pick and shovel. Click here to return to the previous slide.

7 6 The state bird of Arizona is the cactus wren (Heleodytes brunneicapillus couesi), officially recognized in The largest North American wren (7-9 inches), cactus wrens are native to the arid south- western United States extending to central Mexico. Cactus wrens primarily eat insects (including ants, beetles, grasshoppers, and wasps) and occasional seeds and fruits. Almost all water is obtained from its food (a true bird of the desert, the cactus wren rarely drinks free standing water, even when available). Click here to return to the previous slide.

8 7 The critically endangered Apache trout (Oncorhynchus apache) was designated the state fish of Arizona in Found nowhere else in the world, Apache trout were nearing extinction caused by the introduction of non-native trout and early methods of livestock grazing, timber harvest and other land uses that impacted their habitat. Click here to return to the previous slide.

9 8 The Arizona ridge-nosed rattlesnake (Crotalus willardi) was recognized as the official state reptile of Arizona in First known to science in 1905, this small brown snake is one of the most primitive rattlesnakes found in this country. This snake is a unique species which is an important and irreplaceable part of the North American natural heritage. Characterized by the strong white facial stripes and the distinctive ridge along each side of its nose, the ridge- nosed rattlesnake inhabits the moist pine-oak canyons of the Santa Rita and Huachuca Mountains in Arizona. It is well camouflaged, but If discovered it will usually try to crawl rapidly away rather than present a defense. The venom does not appear to be particularly potent and no human deaths from its bite are recorded. Scientists have identified 36 species of rattlesnake (rattlesnakes live only in North and South America). Thirteen species of rattlesnake live in Arizona (more than any other state). Click here to return to the previous slide.

10 9 The Arizona Tree Frog (Hyla eximia) was designated the state amphibian of Arizona in Elected by the school children of Arizona during the "Arizona Wildlife Awareness" program in 1985 (sponsored by Arizona Game & Fish Commission), the Arizona tree frog won over the other three finalists: the red spotted toad, the Colorado River toad, and the spadefoot toad. Found in the mountains of central Arizona and western New Mexico, The Arizona frog inhabits oak, pine and fir forests above 5,000 feet elevations. Also called mountain frog, the diminutive Arizona tree frog is only 3/4" to 2" long. It is usually green but can also be gold to bronze in color (with a whitish belly). Arizona tree frogs have a dark stripe that starts at the snout, runs through the eye, and extends along its body to just before the rear legs. It may also have spots or bars on its back. Click here to return to the previous slide.

11 10 The ringtail (Bassariscus astutus) was designated the state mammal of Arizona in Ringtails are cat-sized carnivores resembling a small fox with a long raccoon-like tail. The tail is about the length of the head and body with black and white bands and a black tip. Five toes on each foot are equipped with sharp, curved, non-retractile claws. Click here to return to the previous slide.

12 11 The pure white waxy blossom of the giant saguaro cactus was designated the state flower of Arizona in Saguaro cactus (Cereus giganteus) is indigenous to Arizona and grows to a height of forty to fifty feet and lives to an age of 150 to 200 years. Click here to return to the previous slide.

13 12 Petrified wood (Araucarioxylon arizonicum) was designated the state fossil of Arizona in Petrified Forest National Park in northern Arizona has one of the world's largest and most colorful concentrations of petrified wood. Made up of almost solid quartz, each piece of petrified wood is like a giant crystal, often sparkling in the sunlight with a rainbow of colors. Click here to return to the previous slide.

14 13 Arizona became the 48th state in Arizona's state quarter features the Grand Canyon, saguaro and other cacti, and the state nickname: "Grand Canyon State" Click here to return to the previous slide.

15 14 Turquoise was designated the official gemstone of Arizona in Probably one of the oldest gemstones known, turquoise is an opaque, blue-to-green mineral. Only the prized robin's egg blue color is used to make gemstones. The majority of the world's finest-quality turquoise comes from western and southwestern United States, the largest producer of turquoise in the world Click here to return to the previous slide.

16 15 There is considerable disagreement on the origin of the term Arizona. Some say it came from a Basque phrase meaning good oak. Others believe it came from a Native American phrase for small spring. A third view is that Arizona is named for the Aztec word for silver bearing. The term Arizonac first applied to a silver mining camp, shortened to Arizona, and applied to the territory. Spanish conquistadors and missionaries came to the area around 1540, but missionary settlements didnt begin in earnest until the late 1600s. The area remained under Spanish, then Mexican, control until the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, when the U.S. bought Mexicos northern territories for $15 million. The area south of the Gila River was bought by the U. S. in When the territory of New Mexico seceded from the Union in 1861, Arizona was declared a territory of the confederacy in President Abraham Lincoln declared Arizona a territory of the Union in 1863 and set the states present boundaries. Arizona became the 48 th state of the United States in February of 1912, after considerable political delays. The Republican president wanted changes in Arizonas constitution, eliminating a recall of judges clause. Democrats wanted the statehood to coincide with the confederacys declaration of Arizona as a territory 50 years earlier.

17 16 Bullhead City Lake Havasu City Yuma Flagstaff Winslow Phoenix Tucson Tombstone Click on a city to get more information. Click here to advance to the next slide

18 17 Grand Canyon Colorado River Mohave Desert Salt River Black Mountains Match the term with the lines on the map to see its location. Click here to advance to the next slide Gila River

19 18 Meteor Crater Petrified Forest Lake Region Lake Powell Painted Desert London Bridge Click here to advance to the next slidehere advance Click on a topic to get more information. Grand Canyon

20 19 Bullhead City Click here to return to the previous slide. Originally called Hardyville after early settler William Hardy, Bullhead City became a ghost town for a time after the mines in the area played out. The town regrew as Davis Dam was built, and has benefitted from the town of Laughlin across the Colorado River. The town became a city in 1984, and now ranks 19th among Arizona cities according to the 2000 census.

21 20 Lake Havasu City Click here to return to the previous slide. Lake Havasu City is the largest city in Mohave County, largely due to the lake behind the Parker Dam and a bridge from across the ocean, the London Bridge. Lake Havasu City ranked 14th among AZ cities in the 2000 census.

22 21 Yuma Click here to return to the previous slide. Yuma has become famous among Arizona cities as a wild west town, even being featured in several western movies. The city ranked 10th among Arizona cities in It was once ruled by California, then by New Mexico, and has had three names: Colorado City, Arizona City, and now Yuma.

23 22 Flagstaff Click here to return to the previous slide. Flagstaff is the largest city in Coconino County, ranking 13th state wide. It is on the western edge of the largest Ponderosa Pine forest in the U.S. It also lies just south of Humphreys Peak, the tallest mountain in Arizona.

24 23 Winslow Click here to return to the previous slide. Winslow ranks 50 th in Arizona cities, but became famous in the Eagles song, Take it Easy. The line Standing on a corner in Winslow, Arizona became so famous the town had to make a monument on a corner, so visitors could see what the line was sung about.

25 24 Phoenix Click here to return to the previous slide. Phoenix is the largest city in Arizona, and has been the state capital since statehood in Though once smaller than Tucson, it was favored as the state capital due to a more central location. It outgrew Tucson and is now the center of commerce in the state. Arizona State University is located in nearby Tempe, the University of Phoenix has several locations in Phoenix, around the state, and around the country.

26 25 Tucson Click here to return to the previous slide. Tucson is the largest city in Pima county and the second largest city in Arizona. It was one of the earliest settlements in Arizona, and was once Arizonas largest city. It has held various titles as Arizonas territorial capital and county seat of Pima county. The University of Arizona is found in Tucson.

27 26 Tombstone Click here to return to the previous slide. Tombstone is famous for the gunfight at the OK Corral, a battle between the Clantons and the Earps. Tombstone was first a mining town, with silver strikes in the area turning it into a boomtown. During World War I, area mines produced manganese for the war effort. In WW II, lead was a major contribution from area mines. After the wars, the area decided tourism was a more lasting economic prospect, and the downtown has several historical sites.

28 27 Although first afforded Federal protection in 1893 as a Forest Reserve and later as a National Monument, Grand Canyon did not achieve National Park status until 1919, three years after the creation of the National Park Service. Today Grand Canyon National Park receives close to five million visitors each year - a far cry from the annual visitation of 44,173 which the park received in Click here to return to the previous slide.

29 28 Click here to return to the previous slide. Lake Mohave Lake Havasu Along the Colorado River, various dams have formed man-made lakes, turning some parts of once desert wasteland into water playlands.

30 29 Click here to return to the previous slide. Robert Paxton McCullochRobert Paxton McCulloch (May 11, 1911 – February 25, 1977) was an American entrepreneur most notable for McCulloch Chainsaws and purchasing the old London Bridge and moving it to one of the cities he founded, Lake Havasu City, Arizona. Lake Havasu sparked the imagination of McCulloch, who purchased 3,500 acres (1,400 ha) of lakeside property along Pittsburgh Point, the peninsula that eventually would be transformed into "the island". entrepreneurLondon Bridge

31 30 Click here to return to the previous slide. The Glen Canyon Dam, on the Colorado River, formed Lake Powell. Construction began in 1956, and the dam was finished in Page, Arizona, like Bullhead City, was built in large part because of the dam construction nearby. Although much of the lake is actually in Utah, the lake begins in Arizona. It is the second largest man-made reservoir, behind Lake Mead.

32 31 Click here to return to the previous slide. The Painted Desert encompasses over 93,500 acres and stretches over 160 miles. It begins about 30 miles north of Cameron, Arizona near the southeastern rim of the Grand Canyon to the Petrified Forest about 26 miles east of Holbrook, AZ. Along the way, it grazes the backyard of the Wupatki National Monument Indian Ruins. The Painted Desert derives its name for the multitude of colors ranging from lavenders to shades of gray with vibrant colors of red, orange and pink. It is a long expanse of badland hills and buttes and although barren and austere, it is a beautiful landscape of a rainbow of colors.Grand CanyonPetrified ForestWupatki National MonumentIndian Ruins

33 32 Click here to return to the previous slide. Meteor Crater is the breath- taking result of a collision between a piece of an asteroid traveling at 26,000 miles per hour and planet Earth approximately 50,000 years ago. Today, Meteor Crater is nearly one mile across, 2.4 miles in circumference and more than 550 feet deep. It is an international tourist venue with outdoor observation trails, air conditioned indoor viewing, wide screen movie theater, interactive discovery center, unique gift and rock shop, and Astronaut Memorial Park at the modern Visitor Center located on the crater rim.

34 33 Click here to return to the previous slide. Over 13,000 years of human history and culture can be found at Petrified Forest National Park. From prehistoric peoples to early explorers, from the Civilian Conservation Corps to Historic Route 66, the park has many stories to tell.prehistoric peoplesCivilian Conservation CorpsHistoric Route 66 Museum Collection Virtually explore over 200,000 items in the park's museum collection. Petrified Forest National Park has archeological objects from Anasazi, Mogollon, and Sinagua sites; ethnological objects related to Hopi and Navajo cultures; Triassic invertebrate and vertebrate fossils collected from the Chinle Formation; representative geological specimens collected from the Chinle Formation; a photographic archive; and a biological collection.museum collection

35 34 I want to see it again!want I want to take the quiz! Im done, get me out of here!

36 35 Click on the best answer. When did Arizona become a state?

37 36 Click here for your next attempt at brainy demonstrations!

38 37 When Arizona became a state, it was the ______ to do so. 42nd45th51st48th

39 38 Click here for your next attempt at brainy demonstrations!

40 39 The state bird is… the cactus wren the roadrunner the cardinal the saguaro flower

41 40 Click here for your next attempt at brainy demonstrations!

42 41 ridge-nosed rattlesnake diamondback rattlesnake saguaro flower Mohave greenback Arizonas state reptile is a …

43 42 Click here for your next attempt at brainy demonstrations!

44 43 Arizonas state flower is a … Mohave greenback Cactus rose dandelion saguaro flower

45 44 Click here for your next attempt at brainy demonstrations!

46 45 Which is a lake on the Colorado river? Lake Mead Lake Mohave Lake Powell All of the above Lake Havasu

47 46 Click here for your next attempt at brainy demonstrations!

48 47 Part of Arizona became part of the U.S. as a result of … the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo the Revolutionary War the Civil War The Louisiana Purchase

49 48 Click here for your next attempt at brainy demonstrations!

50 49 Bullhead City was once known as… Arizona City Hardyville South Point Kukamunga

51 50 Click here for your next attempt at brainy demonstrations!

52 51 The state capital is … Bullhead City Phoenix Tucson Yuma

53 52 Click here for your next attempt at brainy demonstrations!

54 53 Arizonas nickname is … The Cardinals The Diamondbacks The Grand Canyon State The Thunderbirds

55 54 Fantastic, now for the final screens!

56 55 Click here to try again!

57 56 Slide 3 (flag): State Symbols: Maps: Slide 15 (history): Most of the information was taken from Wikipedia entries. Some information from Arizona, Comptons Encyclopedia, Comptons Learning Company, Chicago, IL, Volume 2, Slides 19 – 26 (cities) Most of the information from Wikipedia entries. Many of the sources used are on the appropriate slides.

58 57


Download ppt "1 1.Symbols 2.History 3.Major Cities 4.Geography 5.Attractions Click here to see the show. Click here to take the quiz."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google