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Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Tobacco Chapter 11.

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1 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Tobacco Chapter 11

2 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Tobacco Contents Section 1 Tobacco Use Section 2 Dangers of Tobacco Use Section 3 A Tobacco-Free Life Chapter 11

3 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 1 Tobacco Use Bellringer List the different types of tobacco products that you know about. Put a star next to the products in your list that you think are addictive. Chapter 11

4 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 1 Tobacco Use Objectives List six types of tobacco products. Identify the drug that makes all forms of tobacco addictive. Name six dangerous chemicals found in tobacco smoke. Identify four carcinogens found in smokeless and other forms of tobacco. State the reasons why herbal cigarettes are not a healthy choice for teens. Chapter 11

5 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 1 Tobacco Use All Tobacco Products Are Dangerous Nicotine is the addictive drug found in all tobacco products. Cigarette smoke contains more than 4,000 chemicals. Of these, at least 40 are carcinogens. Carcinogens are chemicals or agents that cause cancer. Chapter 11

6 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 1 Tobacco Use All Tobacco Products Are Dangerous Tar is a sticky, black substance in tobacco smoke. Tar contains the following carcinogens: Chapter 11 Cyanide Formaldehyde Lead Vinyl chloride Cigarette smoke also contains carbon monoxide, a toxic gas that keeps oxygen from getting into the bloodstream.

7 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 1 Tobacco Use All Tobacco Products Are Dangerous Smokeless tobacco products, such as chewing tobacco and snuff (dip), also contain nicotine and tar. Smokeless tobacco products also contain other carcinogens, such as arsenic, nickel, benzopyrene, and polonium. Chapter 11

8 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 1 Tobacco Use All Tobacco Products Are Dangerous Snuff and chewing tobacco lead to mouth sores and oral cancer. Pipe tobacco, cigars, and even herbal cigarettes also contain nicotine and tar, and therefore contain a large number of carcinogens. Chapter 11

9 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 1 Tobacco Use Chapter 11

10 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 1 Tobacco Use Nicotine Is Addictive Like all addictive drugs, nicotine affects the brain and other parts of the body and leads to physical dependence and addiction. Quitting tobacco use is difficult and withdrawal is unpleasant, but the dangerous effects of tobacco are far worse than the trials of quitting. Chapter 11

11 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Dangers of Tobacco Use Bellringer Draw an outline of a person, and label all the parts of the body you think might be affected by tobacco use. Chapter 11

12 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Dangers of Tobacco Use Objectives State the short-term effects of tobacco use. Summarize the long-term health risks associated with tobacco use. State the effects of secondhand smoke on a nonsmoker. Describe how smoking affects unborn children whose mothers smoke during pregnancy. List three reasons you would give a friend to encourage him or her not to smoke. Chapter 11

13 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Dangers of Tobacco Use Short-Term Effects of Tobacco Use Nicotine has the following short-term effects: Chapter 11 Stimulates the brain reward system Increases heart rate and blood pressure Increases breathing rate Increases blood-sugar levels Stimulates the vomit reflex Carbon monoxide blocks oxygen from the blood. Tar and other chemicals damage the lungs and inside of the mouth.

14 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Dangers of Tobacco Use Long-Term Effects of Tobacco Use Long-term tobacco use leads to addiction. Long-term tobacco use has a number of minor effects, such as stained teeth and fingers and a pervasive smell of smoke. Chapter 11

15 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Dangers of Tobacco Use Long-Term Effects of Tobacco Use Mouth Smoking changes the natural chemical balance inside the mouth, leading to increased plaque, gum disease, and tooth decay. Tar in tobacco smoke stains teeth yellow. Chapter 11

16 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Dangers of Tobacco Use Long-Term Effects of Tobacco Use Brain Smoking reduces oxygen to the brain, narrows blood vessels, and can lead to strokes. Nicotine also changes the brain in ways that lead to addiction. Chapter 11

17 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Dangers of Tobacco Use Long-Term Effects of Tobacco Use Heart Nicotine increases heart rate and blood pressure and narrows the blood vessels. It also increases the risk of hardened and clogged arteries, which can lead to a heart attack. Chapter 11

18 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Dangers of Tobacco Use Long-Term Effects of Tobacco Use Lungs Cigarette smoke puts carcinogens directly into the lungs. It kills the tiny hairs that remove harmful substances from the lungs. The loss of these hairs increases the risk of bronchitis, emphysema, and lung cancer. Chapter 11

19 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Dangers of Tobacco Use Long-Term Effects of Tobacco Use Skin Smoking breaks down the proteins that give skin elasticity. This leads to wrinkles and premature aging of the skin. Smoking also increases a person’s chances of developing skin cancer. Chapter 11

20 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Dangers of Tobacco Use Long-Term Effects of Tobacco Use Immune System Chemicals in smoke reduce the activity of immune system cells. Damaging the immune system increases the chances of suffering from diseases such as cancer. Chapter 11

21 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Dangers of Tobacco Use Chapter 11

22 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Dangers of Tobacco Use Effects of Smoke on Nonsmokers Sidestream smoke is the smoke that escapes from the tip of a lit cigarette, cigar, or pipe. This can be as much as half of the total smoke. Mainstream smoke is the smoke that is inhaled through a tobacco product and exhaled by the user. Environmental tobacco smoke (secondhand smoke) is a combination of mainstream and sidestream smoke. Chapter 11

23 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Dangers of Tobacco Use Effects of Smoke on Nonsmokers Lung cancer caused by secondhand smoke kills 3,000 nonsmokers in the U.S. each year. Secondhand smoke also causes other illnesses, including reduced heart function, headaches, nausea, and dizziness. Chapter 11

24 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Dangers of Tobacco Use Effects of Smoke on Nonsmokers Children who live with smokers suffer from a higher rate of lower respiratory infections and asthma. Smoking while pregnant can lead to miscarriage, premature birth, sudden infant death syndrome, and developmental problems. Chapter 11

25 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 3 A Tobacco-Free Life Bellringer The American writer Mark Twain said, “Quitting smoking is easy; I’ve done it dozens of times.” What do you think he meant by this statement? Chapter 11

26 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 3 A Tobacco-Free Life Objectives Discuss the factors that contribute to tobacco use. Summarize three ways that tobacco use affects families and society. List four things a person can do to make quitting smoking easier. Name five benefits of being tobacco free. List five ways to refuse tobacco products if they’re offered to you. Chapter 11

27 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 3 A Tobacco-Free Life Why Do People Use Tobacco? Family and Friends Misconceptions Advertising Curiosity Rebellion Chapter 11

28 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. Section 3 A Tobacco-Free Life Tobacco Use Affects the Family and Society Costs to families include: Chapter 11 Over $1,500 a year to buy tobacco Lost wages due to illness Medical bills Funeral bills Costs to society include billions of dollars for medical care that smoker’s cannot pay for themselves.

29 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 3 A Tobacco-Free Life Tips for Quitting Reasons to quit smoking include: Chapter 11 Smoking is unhealthy. Smoking is expensive. Smoking stinks. Smoking looks unattractive. Smoking damages your skin.

30 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 3 A Tobacco-Free Life Tips for Quitting Quitting smoking is difficult, but there are many support programs and products that can help you. Nicotine substitutes are medicines that deliver a small amount of nicotine to help you quit smoking. Chapter 11

31 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 3 A Tobacco-Free Life Tips for Quitting Important steps in quitting smoking include: Chapter 11 Decide you can do it Get started Change your habits Set goals Get support

32 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 3 A Tobacco-Free Life Chapter 11

33 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 3 A Tobacco-Free Life Making GREAT Decisions Don’t forget the Making GREAT Decisions model. Practicing these skills can help you quit smoking or decide never to start in the first place. Chapter 11

34 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 3 A Tobacco-Free Life Chapter 11

35 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 3 A Tobacco-Free Life Building Resiliency Being offered tobacco products or quitting smoking are stressful situations. Resilient people continue to be optimistic when life gets tough. The next slide provides eight skills to help build your resiliency. Chapter 11

36 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 3 A Tobacco-Free Life Chapter 11

37 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 3 A Tobacco-Free Life Skills for Refusing Tobacco As with alcohol and other drugs, you should practice and use refusal skills when people offer you tobacco. When using refusal skills: Chapter 11 Be honest Give a reason Suggest an alternative

38 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 3 A Tobacco-Free Life Chapter 11

39 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 3 A Tobacco-Free Life Chapter 11

40 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 3 A Tobacco-Free Life Benefits of Being Tobacco-Free Here are some more reasons to quit smoking, or to avoid starting in the first place: Chapter 11 Fewer colds, sore throats, and asthma attacks Not coughing when you are sick Avoiding stained teeth and bad breath Tasting food and smelling the flowers Not smelling like smoke Not exposing others to smoke

41 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 3 A Tobacco-Free Life Benefits of Being Tobacco-Free After you quit smoking: Chapter 11 Within a half hour, blood pressure and heart rate return to normal Within 8 hours, carbon monoxide leaves blood Within a few days, smell, taste, and breathing improve Within months, lung health improves, risk of lung cancer, emphysema, and heart disease decrease

42 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 3 A Tobacco-Free Life Building Self-Esteem It is easier to remain tobacco-free when you have high self-esteem. The next slide provides tips for building your self-esteem. Chapter 11

43 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 3 A Tobacco-Free Life Chapter 11

44 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Click below to watch the Brain Food Video Quiz that accompanies this chapter. You may stop the video at any time by pressing the Esc key. Brain Food Video Quiz

45 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu End of Chapter 11 Show


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