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“We cannot make the mistake of thinking that misconduct won’t happen in USA Volleyball!” 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport Slide #38 Manual Page 2A-1.

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Presentation on theme: "“We cannot make the mistake of thinking that misconduct won’t happen in USA Volleyball!” 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport Slide #38 Manual Page 2A-1."— Presentation transcript:

1 “We cannot make the mistake of thinking that misconduct won’t happen in USA Volleyball!” 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport Slide #38 Manual Page 2A-1

2 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: An Introduction  6 to 13%  6 to 13% of athletes experience some form of sexual abuse or assault within their sports by the age of out of every 8  That’s as many as 1 out of every 8 athletes! even greater elite athletes  Numbers may be even greater for elite athletes  6 to 13%  6 to 13% of athletes experience some form of sexual abuse or assault within their sports by the age of out of every 8  That’s as many as 1 out of every 8 athletes! even greater elite athletes  Numbers may be even greater for elite athletes Slide #39 community professionalsrole models  USA Volleyball strives to be community of professionals & role models professionalismathletes safe competition healthy  We count on professionalism to keep athletes safe & competition healthy  We must educate to reduce chances for misconduct  We must educate all involved to reduce chances for misconduct community professionalsrole models  USA Volleyball strives to be community of professionals & role models professionalismathletes safe competition healthy  We count on professionalism to keep athletes safe & competition healthy  We must educate to reduce chances for misconduct  We must educate all involved to reduce chances for misconduct The Stats! The Goals! Manual Page 2A-2

3 Elements of the Program:  Policies on Misconduct:  Bullying  Harassment  Hazing  Sexual, Physical & Emotional Misconduct  Awareness, Education and Training:  IMPACT & CAP Courses  USOC’s SafeSport on-line course (no cost)  Age-specific materials for athletes  USAV SafeSport education & training materials for Clubs/Parents  Policies on Travel, Social Media & Mobile/Electronic Communications  Screening of Staff and Volunteers  Reporting Concerns of abuse  Monitoring and Supervision  Enforcement of Policies & Penalties Slide #40 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport Manual Page 2A-2

4 Repeated Pattern behaviors intended to cause fearhumiliationphysical harm Repeated Pattern of committing or willfully tolerating physical or non-physical behaviors intended to cause fear, humiliation, or physical harm Slide #41 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: Bullying Bullying Defined:  Can be Verbally, Socially, Physically and in Cyberspace, (Social Media)  Misuse of Power  Harmstargeted athletes, plus team morale and performance  Harms targeted athletes, plus team morale and performance  Bullies target every kind of athlete Manual Page 2A-2 & 3

5 Unwanted, offensive & intrusive behaviors linked to Discrimination  Affects on athletes’ performance:  Loss of focus  Play/perform tentatively  Affects on athletes’ performance:  Loss of focus  Play/perform tentatively Slide #42 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: Harassment  Athletes rarely report due to fear of:  Retaliation  Being viewed as a tattletale  Being further ostracized  Athletes rarely report due to fear of:  Retaliation  Being viewed as a tattletale  Being further ostracized Harassment Defined: Manual Page 2A- 3 & 4

6 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: Bullying & Harassment  Program environment conducive to Team Building  Climate of Trust – talk with athletes  Make known that such actions will not Be tolerated!  Educate athletes – detrimental to team success  “Culture of Disclosure” so athletes are Safe in Disclosing information  Encourage Peers to Step In  Keep Antennae Up - pay attention and ask questions  Program environment conducive to Team Building  Climate of Trust – talk with athletes  Make known that such actions will not Be tolerated!  Educate athletes – detrimental to team success  “Culture of Disclosure” so athletes are Safe in Disclosing information  Encourage Peers to Step In  Keep Antennae Up - pay attention and ask questions Coaches Set the Stage for how athletes treat each other… What can a coach do?! Manual Page 2A- 3 & 4 Slide #43

7 Coercing, requiring or willfully tolerating Humiliating, Unwelcome or Dangerous Activity as Condition for Joining Team. Slide #44 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: Hazing Hazing Defined:  80% of college athletes have reported witnessing or experiencing Hazing  Unlike bullying/harassment, hazing Attempts to INCLUDE athletes  Widespread “Traditions” or “Rites of Passage” may actually Damage Team/Program Cohesion  “Seniority” is NOT “Hazing”  Widespread “Traditions” or “Rites of Passage” may actually Damage Team/Program Cohesion  “Seniority” is NOT “Hazing” Manual Page 2A - 4

8  Educate players and parents about dangers  Provide examples  Send a clear message of a Zero-Tolerance Policy  Communicate it clearly & often  Written and Verbally  Implement Strict Consequences and enforce them 100% of the time  Educate players and parents about dangers  Provide examples  Send a clear message of a Zero-Tolerance Policy  Communicate it clearly & often  Written and Verbally  Implement Strict Consequences and enforce them 100% of the time Slide #45 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: Hazing Coaches Set the Stage for how athletes treat each other… What can a coach do?! Manual Page 2A - 4

9 Behaviors resulting in, have potential to, or threaten to cause physical harm  Does NOT always include physical contact  Non-contact may be more difficult to recognize Behaviors resulting in, have potential to, or threaten to cause physical harm  Does NOT always include physical contact  Non-contact may be more difficult to recognize Slide #46 Physical Misconduct Defined:  Remember - Athlete safety FIRST!  Environment  Positioning  Implements/Equipment  Appropriate medical services for rehab & healthcare  Remember - Athlete safety FIRST!  Environment  Positioning  Implements/Equipment  Appropriate medical services for rehab & healthcare 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: Physical Misconduct Manual Page 2A – 4 & 5

10  All are examples of Physical Misconduct:  Contact causing intentional harm  Denying adequate hydration, nutrition or sleep  Overtraining athletes  Encouraging or permitting athlete to return to play TOO SOON after an injury/concussion  Not providing safe equipment or safe playing environment  Failing to provide appropriate medical services  All are examples of Physical Misconduct:  Contact causing intentional harm  Denying adequate hydration, nutrition or sleep  Overtraining athletes  Encouraging or permitting athlete to return to play TOO SOON after an injury/concussion  Not providing safe equipment or safe playing environment  Failing to provide appropriate medical services Slide #47 Recognizing Physical Misconduct  KNOW your athletes … and the line between pushing & motivating to achieve more … and causing them physical harm! 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: Physical Misconduct Manual Page 2A – 4 & 5

11 Intentional conduct which harms Athlete’s spirit &/or self-worth via repeated rejection, threats, harassment, terrorizing, isolating, or belittling.  Sustained, repeated pattern of non-contact behavior has potential to cause emotional or psychological harm  NOT a substitute for state’s legal definition of “Emotional Abuse”  Misguided attempt to motivate or punish for performance, or inability of coach to control emotions  Most reported form of misconduct  Increases as athletes progress up competitive Ladder  75% of elite athletes have reported they’ve been emotionally abused during athletic careers Intentional conduct which harms Athlete’s spirit &/or self-worth via repeated rejection, threats, harassment, terrorizing, isolating, or belittling.  Sustained, repeated pattern of non-contact behavior has potential to cause emotional or psychological harm  NOT a substitute for state’s legal definition of “Emotional Abuse”  Misguided attempt to motivate or punish for performance, or inability of coach to control emotions  Most reported form of misconduct  Increases as athletes progress up competitive Ladder  75% of elite athletes have reported they’ve been emotionally abused during athletic careers Slide #48 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: Emotional Misconduct Emotional Misconduct Defined: Manual Page 2A – 5

12  Win-at-all-Costs approach  Understand teaching, motivating, and disciplining  Supportive coach-athlete relationships Related to athletic success  Berating/degrading/manipulating athletes is a misuse of authority & ego driven  Ignoring or excluding athlete from practice/matches Breaks down critical coach-athlete relationship  Emotional misconduct can cause athletes to drop out of sport  Win-at-all-Costs approach  Understand teaching, motivating, and disciplining  Supportive coach-athlete relationships Related to athletic success  Berating/degrading/manipulating athletes is a misuse of authority & ego driven  Ignoring or excluding athlete from practice/matches Breaks down critical coach-athlete relationship  Emotional misconduct can cause athletes to drop out of sport Slide #49 Coaches, Beware! 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: Emotional Misconduct Manual Page 2A – 5 & 6

13 Slide #50 Prevent Emotional Misconduct:  Keep ego in check  Build UP athletes…  Focus on positive coaching techniques  Apologize if you accidentally cross the line  Keep ego in check  Build UP athletes…  Focus on positive coaching techniques  Apologize if you accidentally cross the line  Emotional misconduct often connected to other forms of abuse  Emotional abuse makes it easier to go on to physical or sexual abuse by making unrealistic promises, praising then degrading, and isolating from peers  Emotional misconduct often connected to other forms of abuse  Emotional abuse makes it easier to go on to physical or sexual abuse by making unrealistic promises, praising then degrading, and isolating from peers 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: Emotional Misconduct Manual Page 2A – 6

14  Predators are subtle and cunning in approach to victims.  Use combination of attention, affection, and gifts.  Prolonged & purposeful Tactics allow predators to avoid detection & almost guarantee athlete compliance  Vitally important to recognize “grooming” techniques so they can be interrupted and stopped immediately.  Predators are subtle and cunning in approach to victims.  Use combination of attention, affection, and gifts.  Prolonged & purposeful Tactics allow predators to avoid detection & almost guarantee athlete compliance  Vitally important to recognize “grooming” techniques so they can be interrupted and stopped immediately. Slide #51 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: Predator Grooming Behavior  Six identified Stages of Grooming … Predator Grooming Behavior: Manual Page 2A – 6 & 7

15 2. Gaining trust: often, trust comes automatically because “coach” is…  Offenders Identify Vulnerable Victims  Although ANY Athlete can be Preyed Upon by a Kind and Affectionate Adult in a Position of Trust or Authority  Offenders Identify Vulnerable Victims  Although ANY Athlete can be Preyed Upon by a Kind and Affectionate Adult in a Position of Trust or Authority Slide #52 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: Predator Grooming Behavior 1. Targeting a victim:  In a position of mentorship  Considered a role model  In a position of mentorship  Considered a role model Manual Page 2A – 6

16  Giving extra attention  Positive reinforcement  Starting position or playing Time  Scholarship or introduction to recruiters  Learning what the athlete values  Giving extra attention  Positive reinforcement  Starting position or playing Time  Scholarship or introduction to recruiters  Learning what the athlete values Slide #53 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: Predator Grooming Behavior 3. Recognizing & fulfilling needs: 4. Isolating the Victim:  “Special relationship”  Secret sharing  Alone time  Confusion about relationship  “Special relationship”  Secret sharing  Alone time  Confusion about relationship Manual Page 2A – 6

17  Breaks down psychological/physical Barriers  “Accidental” nudity  Use of pornography/touching to get victim desensitized and confused  Sets stage for sexual Assault  Secrecy and blame used to control victim  Breaks down psychological/physical Barriers  “Accidental” nudity  Use of pornography/touching to get victim desensitized and confused  Sets stage for sexual Assault  Secrecy and blame used to control victim  Secrecy and concealment phase  Better the predator is in breaking down barriers, the easier it will be to maintain control and get victim to keep the secret  Abuse may even occur in public, in presence of others  Secrecy and concealment phase  Better the predator is in breaking down barriers, the easier it will be to maintain control and get victim to keep the secret  Abuse may even occur in public, in presence of others Slide #54 5. Sexualizing the Relationship: 6. Maintaining Control: 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: Predator Grooming Behavior Manual Page 2A – 7

18 Many offenders progress to sexually abusing victims or committing Inappropriate acts in front of other witnesses!  This does Two Things:  Creates a defense for the offender…  Sends mixed message to the victim Many offenders progress to sexually abusing victims or committing Inappropriate acts in front of other witnesses!  This does Two Things:  Creates a defense for the offender…  Sends mixed message to the victim Slide #55 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: Predator Grooming Behavior Abuse in Public:  RED FLAGS!  Expensive gifts or money?  Separation of athlete from teammates or parents?  Finds ways to be alone with the athlete?  Expensive gifts or money?  Separation of athlete from teammates or parents?  Finds ways to be alone with the athlete? Manual Page 2A – 7

19 1. Interrupt or disrupt the conduct 2. Share your concerns 3. Report to your designated administrator 4. If you suspect child abuse, report to the proper law enforcement authorities 1. Interrupt or disrupt the conduct 2. Share your concerns 3. Report to your designated administrator 4. If you suspect child abuse, report to the proper law enforcement authorities 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: Responding and Reporting Four Steps for Responding Four Steps for Responding: When or How should I make a report?! When or How should I make a report?!  Don’t attempt to evaluate validity!  USAV requires reporting Sexual Misconduct.  To report abuse call or submit an online Report Abuse Form. Report Abuse Form Report Abuse Form Manual Page 2A – 7 & 8 Slide #56

20 Usually individuals in frequent contact with children  Legal reporting responsibilities vary by state  Some states Include coaches  Many states require anyone who suspects child abuse to report  Failure to report may result in criminal charges Usually individuals in frequent contact with children  Legal reporting responsibilities vary by state  Some states Include coaches  Many states require anyone who suspects child abuse to report  Failure to report may result in criminal charges It’s not an easy situation to be in, but again, don’t evaluate validity before reporting! It’s not an easy situation to be in, but again, don’t evaluate validity before reporting! Slide #57 Mandatory Reporters: 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: Responding and Reporting Manual Page 2A – 8

21  We ALL can/should report to Law Enforcement  Clubs/RVAs may require report of any suspicions, allegations, observations, knowledge of abuse/misconduct  Junior Personnel Code of Conduct REQUIRES adults affiliated with a Jr team to report unethical behavior/misconduct!  Child abuse suspicions/allegations should be reported to your Club, your RVA & proper law enforcement authorities…  Not your responsibility to investigate!  Know your state’s Laws! ( State Statutes Search ) State Statutes Search  Recognize misconduct to maintain safe & fun sport environment  We ALL can/should report to Law Enforcement  Clubs/RVAs may require report of any suspicions, allegations, observations, knowledge of abuse/misconduct  Junior Personnel Code of Conduct REQUIRES adults affiliated with a Jr team to report unethical behavior/misconduct!  Child abuse suspicions/allegations should be reported to your Club, your RVA & proper law enforcement authorities…  Not your responsibility to investigate!  Know your state’s Laws! ( State Statutes Search ) State Statutes Search  Recognize misconduct to maintain safe & fun sport environment Slide #58 Some Final Thoughts on Responding... 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: Responding and Reporting Manual Page 2A – 8

22  Must be professional in nature  For sole purpose of communicating Information about team activities  Must adhere to USAV Code of Conduct regarding athlete protection  Must NOT contain or relate to ANY of the following:  Drugs or alcohol Use  Sexually-oriented language, conversation, activities, or images  Coach’s personal life, social activities, relationships, family issues or personal problems Slide #59 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: Social Media Professionalism Electronic Communication Manual Page 2A – 9

23  T ransparent:  A ccessible:  P rofessional: clear, direct & free from hidden meanings, innuendo and Expectations clear, direct & free from hidden meanings, innuendo and Expectations include another club/team adult in communications – it’s a matter of record! include another club/team adult in communications – it’s a matter of record! high standards & integrity of word choice, tone, grammar and subject matter high standards & integrity of word choice, tone, grammar and subject matter Slide #60 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: Social Media Professionalism TAP Test Manual Page 2A – 9

24 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: Social Media Professionalism  Do NOT accept/request “Friend” requests from/to your athletes on personal pages  No private messages/IM methods w/athletes  Have club Facebook page (or other social site) where players & parents may join to receive team & club activities updates  Set Your pages to “private” to prevent athletes from accessing personal Info  Be smart! Social media is public forever!  Do NOT accept/request “Friend” requests from/to your athletes on personal pages  No private messages/IM methods w/athletes  Have club Facebook page (or other social site) where players & parents may join to receive team & club activities updates  Set Your pages to “private” to prevent athletes from accessing personal Info  Be smart! Social media is public forever! Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Blogs…  TAP Test guidelines…  Limited only to communicating information related to club/team activities  Only between the hours of 7 AM & 10 PM, or alternate start & end time as set by club/RVA policy  TAP Test guidelines…  Limited only to communicating information related to club/team activities  Only between the hours of 7 AM & 10 PM, or alternate start & end time as set by club/RVA policy Texting Manual Page 2A – 9 & 10 Slide #61

25 Slide #62 Final Thoughts on Social Media:  Parents have right to request that children NOT be contacted via any form of electronic communication w/ immediate compliance!  If ing athletes, parents or other coach/administrators must also be copied.  Coaches must refrain from making comments that could be interpreted as slurs, are demeaning, or are derogatory, defamatory or inflammatory.  Avoid exaggeration, colorful language, copyrighted materials, legal conclusions/characterizations.  Think before posting! Will your effectiveness as a coach/mentor & teacher/professional be placed at risk? 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: Social Media Professionalism  Use good judgment – act responsibly/ethically  Post meaningful & respectful comments, & honor differences  Refrain from using social media to publicly discuss/criticize others Manual Page 2A – 10

26  Education & training is best protection athletes have against abuse.  USOC SafeSport.org website (& USAV’s SafeSport webpage) has many resources for: players, parents, coaches & clubsSafeSport.org  Safety of all participants is of utmost importance to USAV (on and off-court).  Remain committed to creating safe & fun sports environments for youth.  Provide training, materials and resources for USAV Regions, clubs, coaches, parents and all athletes.  Zero tolerance policy for abuse & misconduct.  Check the USA Volleyball Website for more information.USA Volleyball Website  Also  And  Coaching using Professional Ethics as your guide – on to Chapter 3!  Education & training is best protection athletes have against abuse.  USOC SafeSport.org website (& USAV’s SafeSport webpage) has many resources for: players, parents, coaches & clubsSafeSport.org  Safety of all participants is of utmost importance to USAV (on and off-court).  Remain committed to creating safe & fun sports environments for youth.  Provide training, materials and resources for USAV Regions, clubs, coaches, parents and all athletes.  Zero tolerance policy for abuse & misconduct.  Check the USA Volleyball Website for more information.USA Volleyball Website  Also  And  Coaching using Professional Ethics as your guide – on to Chapter 3! USOC & USAV SAFESPORT PROGRAMS Slide #63 2A – USAV/USOC SafeSport: SafeSport Program Review Manual Page 2A – 10


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