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Talent management: Incorporating well-being Ivan Robertson.

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Presentation on theme: "Talent management: Incorporating well-being Ivan Robertson."— Presentation transcript:

1 Talent management: Incorporating well-being Ivan Robertson

2 Talent management Attracting candidates Short-listing and selecting candidates Developing and sustaining high performance Managing career transitions - promotion - retraining - redundancy - retirement

3 Assessment: Current approaches Psychometrics Ability tests, e.g. verbal, numerical, spatial, general mental ability Personality assessment Interviews Structured, e.g. behavioural, situational “Psychological” Biodata Work samples Situational judgement Assessment centres (including work samples, situational, psychometrics and interviews)

4 How do we know if an assessment method is any good? Reliability & Validity Reliability Does the method produce reliable scores for a candidate? Inter-rater Test-re-test Internal consistency

5 How do we know if an assessment method is any good? Reliability & Validity Validity Does it measure what it is supposed to? - Content validity - Construct validity - Criterion validity – does it predict work performance?

6 How do we know if an assessment method is any good? Criterion-related validity

7 Current approaches to assessment: The “Champions League” MethodPointsRank Work sample tests541st Cognitive tests512 nd = Structured interviews512 nd = Personality tests404th Assessment centres375th Biodata356th ……… References26 ……… Graphology02Relegation!

8 Current approaches to assessment Focus on performance & competencies – not well- being Maximal performance … not, sustainable (typical) Performance … not performance under pressure Can someone do it … not, will they flourish?

9 Why well-being matters People higher on psychological well-being Show greater flexibility and originality Respond better to unfavourable feedback Make more positive judgements about others Show higher levels of “Engagement” Are more productive Are likely to live longer … be sick less often … and have happier work and home life *Lyubomirsky, King & Diener, 2005

10 Why well-being matters Boorman review (2009)* Health & well-being related to: MRSA, Patient satisfaction, Agency spend Harter, Schmidt and Keyes (2003) Nearly 8,000 separate business units in 36 companies engagement/well-being correlated with business unit performance (sickness-absence, customer satisfaction, productivity, employee turnover, etc…)

11 Why well-being matters Some studies: Donald et al., (2005) – almost a quarter (23%) of variance in employee productivity (sample of 16,000UK employees) is explained by: - Psychological well-being - Perceived commitment of organisation to employee - Resources and communications Cropanzano and Wright (1999) Five year longitudinal study of psychological well-being and performance. Strong correlation between well-being and work performance Taris & Schreurs (2009) Client satisfaction (66 organisations, r=.29) Ford et al., (2011) Overall performance (111 organisations, total sample 10,000+, r=.40)

12 Pressure, performance & well-being Demands Control Support Johnson & Hall, 1988; De Lange et al., 2003; O’Driscoll & Brough, 2010

13 The “6 essential” sources of pressure Resources and communication (Pressure from lack of resources or information) Control and autonomy (Limitations on how the job is done or freedom to make decisions) Balanced workload (Peaks and troughs in workload, difficult deadlines, unsocial hours, work life balance challenges) Job security & change (Pressure from change and uncertainty about the future) Work relationships (High pressure relationships with colleagues, customers, bosses) Job conditions (Pressure from working conditions or pay and benefits)

14 Resources and Communication Control Work Relationships Balanced workload Job Security & Change Job conditions Psychological well-being & coping behaviour Sustainable performance

15 Assessment for performance AND well-being Sources of pressure differ for different jobs A Job “pressure profile” People differ in how well they can cope with different sources of pressure A Person “pressure profile”

16 Job profile Resources and Communication Control Work Relationships Balanced workload Job Security and Change Job Conditions Source of pressure in the job 6…………………………………….1 Profiling the job

17 Person profile Resources and Communication Control Work Relationships Balanced workload Job Security and Change Job Conditions Troubled by this 1…………………………………….6 Profiling the job

18 Job profile Resources and Communication Control Work Relationships Balanced workload Job Security and Change Job Conditions Person profile Resources and Communication Control Work Relationships Balanced workload Job Security and Change Job Conditions Profiling the job

19 Person profile Resources and Communication Control Work Relationships Balanced workload Job Security and Change Job Conditions Job profile Resources and Communication Control Work Relationships Balanced workload Job Security and Change Job Conditions “Matching” Score Score indicates if person is likely to “flourish” or be “troubled” in the role Comparing the job and the person

20 ASSET Selection Tool Two part matching process: -Profile the pressures associated with a role -Measure a candidate’s ability to cope with these pressures The selection tool is based on the valid and reliable ASSET ‘6 Essentials’ Model

21 Report includes a matching profile and overall matching score ASSET Selection Tool

22 Collaboration to develop tool Requirements of collaborating organisations Identify individual roles where there are reasonably large numbers of employees (more than 10 – larger numbers are even better). Job holders complete two short questionnaires Supervisors of the job holders complete a short performance evaluation questionnaire for each job holder included in the study. Job experts complete a short questionnaire to provide information about each of the specific roles included in the research.

23 Collaboration to develop tool Expected outcomes A new, simple tool that can be used to help ensure that recruits are better able to withstand the pressures in a job. Information for collaborating organisations that gives them insights into the “pressure profile” of each of the jobs that are included in the research. An executive report summarising the work done and the main outcomes. Preferential access to the tool for collaborating organisations.


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