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2006 Copyright – Reflective Insulation Manufacturers Association The Reflective Insulation Manufacturers Association.

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Presentation on theme: "2006 Copyright – Reflective Insulation Manufacturers Association The Reflective Insulation Manufacturers Association."— Presentation transcript:

1 2006 Copyright – Reflective Insulation Manufacturers Association The Reflective Insulation Manufacturers Association

2 Benefits of Reflective Insulation & Radiant Barriers

3 About RIMA The Reflective Insulation Manufacturers Association represents manufacturers and distributors of reflective insulation, radiant barriers and interior radiation control coating materials. RIMA activities are guided by an active board of industry members who participate on national and local levels of building code organizations and governmental agencies. Visit us at

4 Meet the Presenters Bill Lippy, Fi-Foil Company Dave Yarbrough, R&D Services Mike Boulding, TVM Building Products

5 Overview  Installation  Use of R-Values and U-Values  Condensation Control  Q&A

6 Installation Bill Lippy Fi-Foil Company RIMA Past President

7 How Do We Recommend Reflective Insulation Be Installed?

8 New Construction Roof Thermal Breaks, Where and Why are they Recommended?

9 New Construction Walls Thermal Breaks, Where and Why are they Recommended?

10 Retrofit Metal Buildings - Wall and Ceiling

11 Thermos Jug Demonstration What Is The Big Deal About Reflective Air Spaces?

12 Reflective Air Spaces are a Big Deal Non Reflective 3 ½” Air Space = R 1.22 Non Reflective 3 ½” Air Space = R 1.22 A Reflective 3 ½” Air Space = R 9.60 A Reflective 3 ½” Air Space = R 9.60 The R-value depends on the dimensions of the Air Space. The R-value depends on the dimensions of the Air Space. The R-value also depends on heat flow direction. The R-value also depends on heat flow direction.

13 Improved LightingImproved Lighting Condensate ControlCondensate Control Easy to Install and/or RepairEasy to Install and/or Repair Other Benefits

14 Working Around Electricity Working around electricity on site can be a hazard. Always know where primary electrical sources are located. Be careful of trip hazard around electrical cords.

15 Working in High Wind Be aware of windy conditions. Wear appropriate fall protection gear. Follow same safety standards and precautions as with installing traditional insulation products.

16 Lime in Curing Concrete Laying material on freshly poured concrete will cause a chemical reaction and destroy the aluminum foil.

17 R-Values&U-Values Dr. David Yarbrough R&D Services, Inc.

18 R&U Are Used to Calculate Loads Use conventional units: R in ft 2 ∙h∙°F/Btu U in Btu/ ft 2 ∙h∙°F Loads from air-to-air R or U All paths and all materials R = ∆T/(Q/A) U = 1/R ∆T is the air-to-air temperature difference (°F) Q/A is the heat flux (Btu/ ft 2 ∙h) R and U are measured, calculated or a combination Reflective insulation assemblies and hybrid systems use these measures of performance.

19 R Measured vs. R Installed R from C 518: thickness and temperatures are controlled Metal building installations differ: 1. Thickness 2. Temperature Loads are calculated from installed values. Reflective insulations can enhance existing conventional assemblies.

20 Heating/Cooling Loads From HDD/CDD heating degree days cooling degree days HDD/CDD are derived from weather data. An average temperature 90 °F for one day contributes 25 to the annual CDD 65. Search for CLIMATOGRAPHY of the United States no. 81 to get data by state and city. Examples: Los Angeles HDD = 1274 CDD = 679 Orlando HDD = 580 CDD = 3428

21 Calculating Loads Heat in (CDD) requires cooling Heat out (HDD) requires heating A specific area in ft 2

22 Loads – A Quick Estimate Heating Load (Q h ) > Q h =A∙HDD∙24/R Q h =A∙HDD∙24∙U Cooling Load (Q c ) > Q c =A∙CDD∙24/R Q c =A∙CDD∙24∙U The result is in Btu/Year for the area (A) selected.

23 Equipment Efficiency & Cost Heating Equipment: 0.70 – 0.95 combustion 1.0 electrical resistance 1-3 heat pumps Cooling Equipment: air conditioners (coefficient of performance) Utility Used: Heating = Q h /E h X for therms Cooling = Q c /E c X for kwh Add cost factors: therm = $1.6 kwh = (vary with location) Heating cost becomes Q h /E h X X 1.6 ($/yr) Cooling cost becomes Q c /E c X X ($/yr)

24 Example CDD=3428 (Orlando) CDD=3428 (Orlando) A=1000 ft 2 A=1000 ft 2 COP (efficiency)=2 COP (efficiency)=2 R=2 (no insulation) COP R=2 (no insulation) COP $/yr: ↓ $/yr: ↓ 1000x3428X24X X0.0855/(2x2) 1000x3428X24X X0.0855/(2x2) = $ ↑ = $ ↑ R

25 If One Pill is Good, Then Two Pills Are Better C=(1000∙3428∙24∙ ∙0.0855)/(2∙R) C $/year for the 1000 ft2 area C=1036.6/R R Utility Cost Savings ($/yr)

26 Diminishing Return

27 Economic Factors Balance “Cost” against “Benefit”. Balance “Cost” against “Benefit”. Want benefit >> cost Want benefit >> cost Reflectives provide benefits for years Reflectives provide benefits for years Simple Pay Back (with no maintenance) Simple Pay Back (with no maintenance) PB = Cost($)/Savings($/yr) = years PB = Cost($)/Savings($/yr) = years From example with cost $1.25 per ft 2 with savings $412 PB = 3 years From example with cost $1.25 per ft 2 with savings $412 PB = 3 years

28 Inflation and Energy Costs Change A reflective insulation installation lasts for years A reflective insulation installation lasts for years Calculate the sum of all the savings over a period of time (15 years) Calculate the sum of all the savings over a period of time (15 years) Adjust for the rise in the cost of energy, inflation, and the discount rate. Adjust the result to get “current dollars”. The result is PV in current dollars Adjust for the rise in the cost of energy, inflation, and the discount rate. Adjust the result to get “current dollars”. The result is PV in current dollars Subtract the one-time initial investment from the PV to get NPV: Net Present Value Subtract the one-time initial investment from the PV to get NPV: Net Present Value NPV >> 0 for an investment to be attractive. NPV >> 0 for an investment to be attractive.

29 NPV 15 = PV 15 – Initial Cost NPV 15 = PV 15 – Initial Cost Energy Inflation General InflationDiscount Rate PV 15 Energy Inflation General InflationDiscount Rate PV Using PV 15 = Savings 412 $/yr Cost $1250 Using PV 15 = Savings 412 $/yr Cost $1250 NPV 15 = 14.28X412 – 1250 = $4633 (attractive) NPV 15 = 14.28X412 – 1250 = $4633 (attractive) An Example of NPV

30 Summary R or U of the installation R or U of the installation HDD/CDD Data HDD/CDD Data Search: CLIMATOGRAPHY IN [STATE] Search: CLIMATOGRAPHY IN [STATE] Select: (pdf) [STATE] (number) Select: (pdf) [STATE] (number) Calculate annual savings Calculate annual savings Look at economic factors like NPV Look at economic factors like NPV

31 Condensation Control Michael Boulding TVM Building Products RIMA President

32 Condensation Description Dew Point Temperature: Dew Point Temperature: Temperature at which water condenses from an air-water vapor mixture: The dew point depends on the dry bulb temperature and the humidity (or relative humidity) Water Vapor Transport: Water Vapor Transport: Vapor phase water moves from regions of high concentration to regions of low concentration. This is usually from a high temperature region to a low temperature region.

33 Dew Point Temperatures The dew point temperature is the same as the dry bulb temperature (ordinary temperature) when the air has relative humidity 100%. The dew point temperature is the same as the dry bulb temperature (ordinary temperature) when the air has relative humidity 100%. The dew point temperature is less than the dry bulb temperature when the relative humidity is less than 100 %. The dew point temperature is less than the dry bulb temperature when the relative humidity is less than 100 %. The dew point temperature decreases as the relative humidity decreases. The dew point temperature decreases as the relative humidity decreases. Water will condense if the temperature reached the dew point temperature. Water will condense if the temperature reached the dew point temperature.

34 Condensation Occurs... When the surface temperature is less than or equal to Dew Point Temperature When the surface temperature is less than or equal to Dew Point Temperature The interior surface temperature approaches the inside air temperature as the amount of insulation is increased The interior surface temperature approaches the inside air temperature as the amount of insulation is increased The interior surface temperature is affected by the movement of air The interior surface temperature is affected by the movement of air

35 Dew Point Temperatures Relative Humidity Air Temperature ( o F) Relative Humidity Air Temperature ( o F) o F o F

36 To Summarize Dew Point temperature is readily available from air temperature and relative humidity. Dew Point temperature is readily available from air temperature and relative humidity. Temperature differences between the inside air and the ceiling surface depend on thermal resistances, inside temperature, and outside temperature. Temperature differences between the inside air and the ceiling surface depend on thermal resistances, inside temperature, and outside temperature. A low perm (taped) facer will keep water away from cold roof panels (perm less than one). A low perm (taped) facer will keep water away from cold roof panels (perm less than one).

37 Why are Metal Buildings Prone to Condensation Highly conductive roof & walls offer very low resistance to temperature differences Highly conductive roof & walls offer very low resistance to temperature differences Metal framing in also highly conductive Metal framing in also highly conductive Metal is non-porous so condensation forms Metal is non-porous so condensation forms

38 Variables of Condensation Variables in each building affect level of condensation Variables in each building affect level of condensation Condensation forms in both conditioned and un-conditioned buildings Condensation forms in both conditioned and un-conditioned buildings Difficult to apply well known theories because of building variables Difficult to apply well known theories because of building variables

39 Variables That Affect Condensation Indoor & Outdoor temperatures Indoor & Outdoor temperatures Building uses & occupants Building uses & occupants Ventilation Ventilation External Sources of moisture in the building External Sources of moisture in the building New construction or retrofit New construction or retrofit

40 Strategies to Prevent or Control Condensation Prevent warm moist air from contact with cool metal - easier said than done. Prevent warm moist air from contact with cool metal - easier said than done. By installing Reflective Insulation, you By installing Reflective Insulation, you  Install a vapor barrier  Install insulation  Install a thermal break

41 Benefits of Reflective Insulation, Radiant Barriers & Radiation Control Coatings 1) Reduce the heating of the building 2) Create great vapor barriers 3) Creates a great thermal break between hot & cold surfaces 4) Easy to install & work with

42 Questions?

43 Reflective Insulation Manufacturers Association (RIMA) 4519 E. Lone Cactus Drive Phoenix, AZ /


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