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Client logo goes here (add via slide master) Global employee engagement “Clearing the frog” Presentation to: RPI Conference Presented by: Stephen Humphreys.

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Presentation on theme: "Client logo goes here (add via slide master) Global employee engagement “Clearing the frog” Presentation to: RPI Conference Presented by: Stephen Humphreys."— Presentation transcript:

1 Client logo goes here (add via slide master) Global employee engagement “Clearing the frog” Presentation to: RPI Conference Presented by: Stephen Humphreys Date: April 27th 2010

2 Slide 2 Agenda Grass Roots at a glance What is global? Drivers behind globalization The Challenges of going global

3 Slide 3 Grass Roots Grass Roots is the leading and arguably only truly global operator in the performance improvement industry. We help our clients all around the world achieve their business goals by designing and delivering creative programs that influence the attitude and behavior of people with whom they work: Employees, Channel Partners and Consumers.

4 Slide 4 Grass Roots at a glance Worldwide leader in Performance Improvement Privately owned – founded in 1980 Revenue of $500M + Profitable, financially stable, no debt, WPP Group associate Working for over 2,000 client organizations 134 of the Financial Times Global 500 largest corporations 79 of the Fortune of the Financial Times Global 100 brands Grass Roots owns offices in all the major regions of the word 27 offices with presence in over 120 countries, 1,000+ employees Americas, EMEA, APAC

5 Slide 5 Grass Roots at a glance cont'd We have scale 700+ incentive and loyalty based sites 1,000+ databases 2,000+ websites 200k+ and text/SMS messages a day 25m+ web hits a month Five core service disciplines Communication Education Measurement Rewards Events

6 Slide 6 Global footprint

7 Slide 7 What is global? The Ideal ‘One organization, most likely with a common brand, operating in all major regions of the world with broadly similar products, services, policies and a common corporate culture’ Closer to Reality ‘One organization, with a common brand, operating in all major regions of the world but managed on a country or regional basis. Products and services differ significantly by market, policies are country or region centric and cultures are hugely different. Internal communications on a global basis between operating companies and regions is generally poor’

8 Slide 8 Drivers behind globalization The freewheeling days of 12 years of consistent economic growth and strong profits are over for now We have seen corporates focus hugely on cost savings as profits collapse The world’s biggest corporates are primarily based in North America and Europe (not forgetting Japan, of course) and the timing of future growth in those markets is uncertain The BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India and China) economies concept is demonstrating that economic growth may be shifting towards those markets

9 Slide 9 FT global 500 – Representing top 20 countries Source: FT.com - Global 500 by country

10 Slide 10 4 M’s Measure M – Mobiles M – Malls M – Motors M – McDonalds

11 Slide 11 Key Corporate Drivers for launching a global program Cost Control Consistency Fairness

12 Slide 12 Finding a supplier Controlling regional operating companies Language Contact center support Reward choice Affluence Tax Legals The Challenges of going global

13 Slide 13 Dividing up the globe North America Latin America (LATAM) including central America and the Caribbean Europe (EMEA), which gets a bit blurred when you include the emerging Eastern European countries and Russia, the Middle East and Africa. Asia Pacific (APAC) reaching from India and China to the West and Australia in the East. This region is vast – it is quicker to fly from London to Mumbai (India) than it is from Australia to Mumbai!

14 Slide 14 Languages The language of the engagement platform Contact center support for users Account management

15 Slide 15 Language Approaches Use English throughout as it it’s the designated language of the company  The difficulty here is that Spanish, French and German are also important economic languages. Mandarin Chinese, Hindi and Portuguese (Brazil) are becoming increasingly important Use English for the ’front end’ of the platform but switch to local language when participants enter the reward catalog  A common approach that sounds clumsy but seems to work well Use the major languages for the ‘front end’ of the site (This will depend on the geographic spread of the company but is likely to include English, Spanish, German, French, Mandarin Chinese, Hindi, Portuguese and Japanese) and add local languages for the reward catalog  Probably the best approach but the most expensive to set up and maintain. Use the local language in every operating country  Idealistic but I haven’t seen it done yet on any scale

16 Slide 16 Contact Center Support – The issues How do we engage Interactive Voice Response or IVR (Our experience shows this can deal with 80% plus of queries at the first stage. Cost effective) (Quite effective in multiple languages with a translation team) SMS/Text Chat (e.g. LivePerson) Voice (Expensive to support, especially in lots of languages) Facebook, Twitter, etc (Still at the experimental stage) Where do you require support Program rules and queries (Is this to be handled by the supplier or the company? What protocol do we need to redirect cases?) Technical queries (Some will be to do with the company technology infrastructure and will need redirecting. Others will be platform related) Access and password problems Fulfillment issues (where’s my reward? It was the wrong color. It was broken.) Time zones

17 Slide 17 Global reward choices Spain – Jamon France – Fine wines UK - A personal shredder India – A case of fresh mangos South Africa – A bed or refrigerator US – Overall consumer electronics but during the economic crises we saw a boom in demand for luxury pillows

18 Slide 18 Per Capita Income around the world Source: International Monetary Fund, 2009 $

19 Slide 19 The Big Mac Index “Burgernomics is based on the theory of purchasing-power parity, the notion that a dollar should buy the same amount in all countries. Thus in the long run, the exchange rate between two countries should move towards the rate that equalizes the prices of an identical basket of goods and services in each country. Our "basket" is a McDonald's Big Mac, which is produced in about 120 countries. The Big Mac PPP is the exchange rate that would mean hamburgers cost the same in America as abroad. Comparing actual exchange rates with PPPs indicates whether a currency is under- or overvalued.” Source: The Economist

20 Slide 20 The challenges of going global Finding a supplier Controlling regional operating companies Language Contact center support Reward choice Affluence Tax Legals

21 Client logo goes here (add via slide master) Thank you Stephen Humphreys President & CEO of Grass Roots 1111 Lincoln Road – Suite 700 Miami Beach, FL USA Phone: (305) ext grassrootsamerica.com


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