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Prepositional Errors. Double Prepositions The Double Preposition is sometimes correct and sometime incorrect. – CORRECT: – He stepped out of the car.

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Presentation on theme: "Prepositional Errors. Double Prepositions The Double Preposition is sometimes correct and sometime incorrect. – CORRECT: – He stepped out of the car."— Presentation transcript:

1 Prepositional Errors

2 Double Prepositions The Double Preposition is sometimes correct and sometime incorrect. – CORRECT: – He stepped out of the car. – He walked up to the stage. – He came over to the house. – Incorrect: – Mother was looking out of the window. – I shall be there at about ten o’clock. – I put the boat up under the dock.

3 To Blame someone WRONG: – He blamed the accident on Max. Correct: – He blamed Max for the accident. Wrong: – Please don’t blame it on Jamie. Correct: – Please don’t blame Jamie.

4 Differ from-Differ with Differ “from” means to be dissimilar. – Ex: This book differs from that one. Differ “with” means to disagree with someone. – Ex: Mr. Myers differs with Jake about the topic.

5 Different from-Different than This car is different than that car. This sentence is worded to show difference between two objects. How would we change this?

6 Different from-Different than This car is different than that car. – Since “than” is a conjunction the sentence would technically read This car is different than that car is different. The correct answer would be: This car is different from that car.

7 Unnecessary use-of The preposition “of” is often incorrectly used with verbs. Listed below are some common instances of this error. – Wrong: Keep off of the grass. Father was gazing out of the window. The car was alongside of the garage.

8 Could, Should, Must-Have Wrong: – I could of had three more helpers. – I should of left the lights on. – I must of lost my wallet. Correct: – I could have had three more helpers. – I should have left the lights on. – I must have lost my wallet.

9 Up-Separating from the verb. (This one can be tricky because it sounds correct) “If the preposition ‘up’ is used with a verb, it should be needlessly separated from the verb. – Wrong: The highwayman held the roofer up. – Correct: The highwayman held up the roofer. – Wrong: The mechanic tuned the motor up. – Correct: The mechanic tuned up the motor.

10 With, at and to One becomes angry with persons, but at situations. – Wrong: I was angry at my brother. – Correct: I was angry with my brother. – Wrong: I was angry with the results. – Correct: I was angry at the results. – NOTE: To compare “to” or compare “with” are both acceptable.

11 To or at You would point to something abstract You would point at something concrete. Wrong: I pointed to the man in left field. Correct: I pointed at the man in left field. Wrong: He wanted to point at the future for inspiration. Correct: He wanted to point to the future for inspiration.

12 Involved with or in? In general, you are involved in a process and involved with another person. – Jerry is involved in a new course of study. – Jerry is involved with his coworker. (indicates a love affair) – The new mother is involved in a different kind of hobby. – The new mother is involved with her aging parents. – The cat was involved in chasing a mouse when I left this morning. – The businessman is involved in the fraud case.


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