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Mentoring Across Tiers Christina Jordan, M.Ed Wayne Hickman, Ed. D Rebecca Piermattei, M.S.

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Presentation on theme: "Mentoring Across Tiers Christina Jordan, M.Ed Wayne Hickman, Ed. D Rebecca Piermattei, M.S."— Presentation transcript:

1 Mentoring Across Tiers Christina Jordan, M.Ed Wayne Hickman, Ed. D Rebecca Piermattei, M.S.

2 Outline Purpose of Mentoring What systems features are needed for mentoring at tier 2 and tier 3 Role of the coach in helping guide mentoring efforts Use of data for T2/T3 interventions Practices to support implementation across the tiers Resources Purpose of Mentoring What systems features are needed for mentoring at tier 2 and tier 3 Role of the coach in helping guide mentoring efforts Use of data for T2/T3 interventions Practices to support implementation across the tiers Resources

3 KEY FEATURES 1.Focused outcomes 2.Use of data to determine need and to monitor progress 3.Support systems for staff to access professional development and collaborative problem-solving 4.Evidence-based practices to support student success

4 SYSTEMS Support Staff Behavior PRACTICES Support Student Behavior DATA Supports Decision Making Valued Outcome:

5 Activity Expectations: Actively participate in activity Work in pairs Share your thoughts Listen attentively to others Follow attention signal 1.Introduce yourself to your neighbor 2.Discuss whether the schools you work with currently have mentoring programs 3.Use the back of a handout to create a picture/symbol to describe the desired outcome of the mentoring program at your school. Your neighbor will try to guess what the desired outcome is. *** (If neither of you has a mentoring program at your school, complete the same activity using a desired outcome of a mentoring program/Targeted intervention you would like to start). YOU HAVE 3 MINUTES

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7 Why Mentoring? Provides additional adult support Adults model expected behavior Opportunities for adults to explicitly teach expected behaviors Opportunities for staff to provide practice and feedback on expected behaviors Adult contact to provide early warning referrals

8 OUTCOMES Can be academic, behavioral, cognitive/affective, social-emotional BUT… should be clearly defined, targeted, and use evidence-based practices to change student behavior

9 Question ??? Expectations: Work in pairs Share your thoughts Listen attentively to others Follow attention signal What do the tiers mean to you? What do they mean to your PBIS team? What do they mean to building administration? What does your school/district have in place to support multi-tiered systems? YOU HAVE 4 MINUTES

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11 What does it mean to mentor across tiers? Use PBIS framework to structure supports Focus on data, systems, practices Continuum of supports Layering of supports Communication between teams at all tiers Sorting by intervention focus, not by students

12 SYSTEMS FEATURES Coordinating team Roles and responsibilities defined Shared responsibility among the team Support staff with PD and problem solving Communication with all stakeholders

13 Critical Features of T2 Interventions 1.Linked to SW expectations 2.Continuously available for students and implemented within 3 school days 3.Can be modified 4.Includes structured prompts for “what to do” in relevant situations 5.Students receive positive feedback from staff 6.Orientation materials to staff 7.Orientation materials to students and families 8.Home-school Communication 9.Opportunities for students to be re-taught and practice skills daily

14 REALLY, REALLY KEY features and what COACHES can do Linked to learning outcomes Administrative support Fits with demands of the school Appropriate training and support for staff On-going feedback and communication Shared responsibility among coordinating TEAM On-going feedback and communication

15 Capacity Building Help teams understand what is needed to plan, support, implement and maintain interventions

16 Activity Expectations: Actively participate in activity Work in small groups Follow attention signal QUESTION: HOW COMFORTABLE IS YOUR TEAM WITH USING DATA TO MAKE DECISIONS FOR ADVANCED TIER INTERVENTIONS? YOU HAVE 90 SECONDS!!!

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18 Data-based Decision-making Outcomes and outcome data are identified Screening criteria for student participation Progress monitoring tool identified Targeted intervention aligned with desired outcome Data analyzed consistently

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21 ACTIVITY Expectations: Work in pairs Share your thoughts and listen attentively to others Follow attention signal A-Z: See if you can list 25 skills that students may need to be re-taught through mentoring. YOU HAVE 4 MINS!

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23 Practices to support implementation across the tiers PLANNING, PLANNING, PLANNING!!! Effective and efficient tier 2 team Appropriate resources to support intervention Opportunity to re-direct or re-teach appropriate school behavior and skills Opportunity for communication and feedback between students, staff, families Evaluation of student AND program progress Opportunity to modify intervention to fit school AND student needs

24 Program Coordination School manual developed Process for informing staff Process for informing students Process for sharing and receiving input with parents/guardians Ongoing training and support in place: Focus groups Linked to other school resources/supports as needed

25 Program Goals Mentor Coordination, Orientation, Training, Mentee Screening, Recruitment, Introduction Mentoring Procedures Documentation Procedures Data-sharing Procedures Modifying/Layering supports Home-School Connection Program Evaluation ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF EFFECTIVE MENTORING

26 Program Goals Academic: (Ready to Learn) Increase work completion Increase time in instruction Increase grade point averages Increase credits accumulated Explore post-secondary options Earn service learning hours toward graduation B ehavioral: (Responsibility) Increase rates of attendance Increase time on task Increase work completion Increase school involvement Increase community involvement Enhance leadership skills Social: (Respect) Increase positive peer interactions Increase school engagement Increase community involvement Demonstrate leadership skills Expand school support network

27 Program Coordination, Orientation, Training, ONGOING SUPPORT Led by building staff (who had been trained in EBPs) Program Coordination (# of coordinators may differ depending on intensity of intervention) Roles and responsibilities defined Recruited other staff through social marketing Information session then option to participate as mentor Outlined mentor expectations at intro meeting STAFF must understand what they are committing to do Then trained in some key components of mentoring

28 Mentee Screening, Recruitment, Introduction Data decision rules that are measurable and match program outcomes Used data to narrow to match capacity Introduction= Group meeting, video, activity, pairing with mentors, Q&A, and opportunity to “opt out”

29 Mentoring Procedures Manualized to provide support and consistency for staff and students Didn’t re-create the wheel (many resources) Focused on providing prompts and framework to staff Focused on SKILL BUILDING for students Focused on increasing student autonomy and ownership of school success Linked to SW expectations Explicitly taught and reinforced The amount of time spent with students, frequency of meetings with students, number of meetings with other staff parents, families, outside agencies, and amount of re-teaching/feedback/re- direction needed will differ as the intensity of intervention changes

30 Documentation Procedures Easy for mentors Purposeful: Gives us important information to plan for program improvements and student RTI Is analyzed and shared with the team and administration Daily, weekly, bi-weekly, monthly, quarterly Frequency and depth of information may differ as the level of intensity of the intervention changes

31 Data sharing and Communication Procedures With mentors With students With families With coordinators With administration With other stakeholders Monthly and quarterly Frequency and depth of information may differ as the level of intensity of the intervention changes

32 Modifying/Layering supports Data tracking and early referral Connecting to other services/interventions Student RTI Intensifying and/or individualizing interventions

33 Home-School Connection Share information with families/guardians Gain input from families/guardians Encourage student sharing of information to and from school Interest not only in academic achievement, but in social competence and involvement in productive activities outside of school Frequency and depth of information may differ as the level of intensity of the intervention changes

34 Program Evaluation Fidelity Measures % of students responding to intervention Refer to data presentation Use program feedback to modify intervention to fit the needs of the population or to align students with appropriate supports

35 Resources me at and I will share our Google drive with a template of our mentoring

36 Acknowledgements MDS3 is funded by a grant from the USDOE. Federal Grant CFDA# Q184Y Sheppard Pratt Health System: – Wayne Hickman, Ed.D. – Christina Jordan, M.Ed. – Rebecca Piermattei, M.S. Maryland State Department of Education Johns Hopkins University


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