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Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) “How to Write a Successful NSF Grant” NISTS September 21, 2010 Eun-Woo Chang, Program Director Division of Undergraduate.

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Presentation on theme: "Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) “How to Write a Successful NSF Grant” NISTS September 21, 2010 Eun-Woo Chang, Program Director Division of Undergraduate."— Presentation transcript:

1 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) “How to Write a Successful NSF Grant” NISTS September 21, 2010 Eun-Woo Chang, Program Director Division of Undergraduate Education National Science Foundation

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3 www.nsf.gov

4 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) National Science Foundation (NSF) The National Science Foundation (NSF) Act of 1950 (Public Law 81-507) sets for its mission: To promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare; to secure the national defense.

5 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) NSF’s Annual Budget - 21% of the total federal budget for basic research conducted at U.S. colleges and universities. - This share increases to 61% when medical research supported by the National Institutes of Health is excluded.

6 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)

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9 “EHR’s Mission is to promote the development of a diverse and well-prepared workforce of scientists, engineers, mathematicians, educators, and technicians and a well informed citizenry who have access to the ideas and tools of science and engineering.”

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12 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) NSF Budget Education and Human Resources (EHR): FY 2009 (Actual)$845 Million FY 2010 (Estimate)$873 Million FY 2011 (Requested)$892 Million Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE): FY 2009 (Actual)$283 Million FY 2010 (Estimate) $292 Million FY 2011 (Requested) $290 Million *Note: Extra $75-100 Million from H-1B visa fees employers pay to obtain a visa for a foreign high-tech worker to fund the S-STEM program.

13 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Selected Programs in DUE FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 (Actual) (Estimate) (Requested) ATE $52 $64 $64 CCLI/TUES $66 $63 $61 STEP $29 $30 $30 S-STEM $75-100 /year from H1B visa fee NOYCE $115$55 $55 MSP $86$58 $58 *(in Million)

14 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Talent Expansion Program (STEP) PROGRAM SOLICITATION NSF 08-569

15 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) STEP - Basic Goals Increase the number of students (US Citizens or permanent residents) in STEM Increase associate’s / bachelor’s degrees - Established or emerging STEM fields Community colleges get credit for transfers to 4-year STEM programs Note: Increases in a particular field must not be at the expense of other fields!

16 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) STEP: Successful projects might provide Bridge programs that enable additional preparation for students from HS or community colleges Programs to improve the quality of student learning - Peer tutoring, learning communities, etc. - New pedagogical approaches (mastery learning, active learning, etc.) Programs to encourage undergraduate research Student support mechanisms

17 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) STEP: Outcomes expected Description of activities that will be institutionalized from the project Plan for continuing efforts to increase number of STEM students & graduates Formative assessment of progress towards goals Dissemination of project results to broader community

18 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) STEP Maximum Support Levels – Enrollment based $500 K for 5 years for 1- 5,000 undergrads $1.0 M for 5 years for 5,001-15,000 undergrads $2.0 M for 5 years for >15,000 undergrads One proposal per institution (can be a partner on only one proposal) STEP Budget $28-30 million expected for FY 2011 20-24 awards expected

19 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) STEP: Deadlines Letter of Intent due August 17, 2010 Full Proposals due September 28, 2010

20 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM) Program Solicitation NSF 09-567

21 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) S-STEM Goal: Provides funds to institutions to provide scholarships to academically talented, but financially needy, students Students can be pursuing associate, bachelor’s, or graduate degrees Scholarships can be up to $10,000/yr - up to 4 yrs within the limits of students official level of need. (They can be less than $10K and less than 4 yrs)

22 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) S-STEM: Major features of program Most STEM disciplines are eligible - except Social & Behavioral sciences Grant size: max $600,000 (up to 5% of the scholarship request can be spent for administrative costs and up to 10% for student support services) One proposal per constituent school or college that awards STEM degrees (e.g., school of engineering, college of arts & sciences) Estimated $50 to $70 million available in FY 2011

23 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) S-STEM: Special program features PI must be member of STEM faculty Scholarships to “natural” cohorts of students S-STEM students are full-time & are US Citizens, Residents, Nationals, or refugees Institution must provide some student support structures Optional enhancements: research opportunities, tutoring, internships, etc.

24 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) S-STEM: Deadlines Optional Letter of Intent Deadline Date: July 13, 2011 (for the August 11, 2011 competition) Proposal Deadline: August 11, 2011

25 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Advanced Technological Education (ATE) PROGRAM SOLICITATION NSF 10-539

26 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) ATE Goal: Educate technicians for the high-tech fields that drive our nation’s economy Sample activities: - Curriculum development - Faculty professional development - Building career pathways

27 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) ATE ATE is in its 16th year of funding community colleges, having started with the Science and Advanced Technology Act of 1992 (SATA). FY2010 Preliminary Proposals April 22, 2010 Formal Proposals October 21, 2010

28 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) ATE Institution Requirements Focus is on two-year colleges All proposals are expected to include one or more two-year colleges in leadership roles A consortium of institutions may also apply

29 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) ATE Tracks Projects - Small Grant ATE Centers - National Centers of Excellence - Regional Centers of Excellence - Resource Centers Targeted research on technician education

30 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Small grants Focus on community colleges that have little or no previous ATE grant experience Designed to stimulate implementation, adaptation, and innovation in technological education

31 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Typical ATE award sizes Project Grants: Up to $300K/year for 3 years (45) Small Grants: Up to $200K (15) National Centers: $5M for 4 years (2) Regional Centers: $3M for 3 years (3) Planning Grants for Centers: $70K Resource Centers: $1.6M for 4 years (4) Targeted Research: Up to $300K for 4 years (5-8)

32 Number of Awards per State in ATE’s 15 Year History Total number of Awards (865) 15 COLORADO 3 MONTANA 2 WYOMING 2 UTAH 2 IDAHO 3 NEVADA 25 OREGON 3 ALASKA HAWAII 99 CALIFORNIA 30 WASHINGTON 21 ARIZONA 5 NORTH DAKOTA 4 SOUTH DAKOTA 7 NEBRASKA 16 NEW MEXICO 53 TEXAS 3 KANSAS 7 OKLAHOMA 18 MINNESOTA 19 WISCONSIN 23 IOWA 6 MISSOURI 4 ARKANSAS 3 LOUISIANA 28 ILLINOIS 8 INDIANA 18 KENTUCKY 42 OHIO 16 MICHIGAN 18 TENNESSEE 12 MISS. 15 ALABAMA 9 GEORGIA 32 FLA. 22 S.C. 18 NORTH CAROLINA 22 VIRGINIA 2 W.V. 16 PENNSYLVANIA 47 NEW YORK 6 MAINE 2 VT. 7 N.H. 62 MA. 14 CT. 1 R.I. 2 DEL. 26 MD. 20 D.C. 16 N.J. 3 PUERTO RICO

33 ATE Centers of Excellence (36) National Center Regional Center Resource Center

34 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)

35 FY 96-0620072008 Biotechnology4758 Chemical Technology/Pulp & Paper/Environmental5831 Multidisciplinary/Institution Reform4342 Electronics/Microelectronics/Nanotech/Mechatronics/Lasers2378 Other Engineering Technology75710 Geospatial (GIS/GPS/Surveying)2834 Manufacturing9245 Math/Physics/Computational Science/Core4011 Computer/Information Systems/Cybersecurity/Telecommunications13988 Marine/Agriculture/Aquaculture/Natural Resources/Viticulture2022 Teacher Preparation3414 Multimedia714 Energy Technology639 Research/Evaluation522 Recruitment/Retention731 Totals6145469 Foci of ATE Awards

36 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Transforming Undergraduate Education in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (TUES) Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) Program Solicitation NSF 10-544 Program Solicitation

37 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) TUES Vision Excellent STEM education for all undergraduate students Goal Stimulate, disseminate, and institutionalize innovative developments in STEM education through the production of knowledge and the improvement of practice. * Our broadest, most innovative program

38 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) TUES: Over time, we have increased our emphasis on Building on and contributing to the literature on effective STEM education Building a community of scholars in STEM education reform Identifying project-specific measurable outcomes *Project management and evaluation

39 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) TUES: Project Types Type 1 $200,000duration: 2 to 3 years (+ $50,000 with community college partner) Type 2 $600,000 duration: 2 to 4 years Type 3 up to $5,000,000 duration: 3 to 5 yrs Central Resource Projects up to $3,000,000duration: negotiable

40 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) TUES: Choice of Type Reflects Scale of the Project Number of institutions, students and faculty Maturity of the Project (Stage) Type 1 may lead to Type 2, etc. But prior CCLI/TUES funding is not required Scope of the Project Defined by the number of components, based on our view of the nature of educational innovation

41 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) TUES must focus on one or more of the following project components. Creating Learning Materials and Strategies Implementing New Instructional Strategies Developing Faculty Expertise Assessing and Evaluating Student Achievement Conducting Research on Undergraduate STEM Education

42 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) TUES: For Example, Type 1 reflects Scope and Scale: One or two program components Limited number of students & faculty at one or more institutions Expected Results: Contribute to understanding of effective STEM education, typically by exploring new ideas Can serve as basis for Type 2 project Transforms a lecture or laboratory course, a curriculum, or a department

43 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) TUES: Types of projects – that transform a course, a curriculum or a department. Integrate new instrumentation or equipment into undergraduate laboratories or field work Develop materials or add instrumentation that use a new instructional approach embodying current understanding of how students learn Develop a tool to assess students’ knowledge or learning gains Provide courses needed for efficient, seamless transfer from 2-yr to 4-yr colleges in partnership with other institutions Explore or pilot-test internet-based approaches for faculty professional development

44 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) TUES: Deadlines Deadline For Type 1 - May 26 & 27, 2011 (check website for days) Deadline For Type 2/3 and Central Resource Projects - January 14, 2011

45 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program PROGRAM SOLICITATION NSF NSF 10-514

46 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) NOYCE: Program tracks Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Track Scholarships for undergraduate STEM majors preparing to become K-12 Teachers Internships for freshmen and sophomores Stipends for STEM professionals seeking to become K-12 teachers NSF Teaching Fellowships & Master Teaching Fellowships (TF/MTF) Track Fellowships for STEM professionals receiving teacher certification through a master’s degree program Fellowships for science and math teachers preparing to become Master Teachers

47 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) NOYCE: Scholarship Track At least $10K per student per year (but not to exceed the cost of education) Max period: 2-3 years for UGs; 1 year for Post-bacc students Phase 1 awards: up to $1.2M up to 5 years. (additional $250K possible for collaborating with a community college) Grants may ask up to 20% for program support costs Noyce scholars must serve 2 years in high-need school for each 1 year of support. Noyce scholars have up to 6 years to complete this obligation.

48 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) NOYCE: TF/MTF Track support features - Teaching Fellows receive at least $10K (not to exceed cost of attendance) while enrolled in Master’s program - While teaching in a high-need school district the TF and MTF recipients receive an annual $10K salary supplement (4 years for TF and 5 years for MTF) - Grants may ask up to 20% for program costs - TF/MTF projects may request up to $3M for 5 to 6 years. (additional $250K possible for collaborating with a community college)

49 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Due Date Letters of Intent (optional): March ?, 2011 Full Proposal Deadline: April ?, 2011

50 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Information about funded proposals 1. Go to the DUE Home website on NSF 2. Find the Program of interest to you 3. Go to the bottom of that page and click on “Abstracts of Recent Awards Made Through This Program” 4. Write to the PI requesting a copy of her/his proposal. * An example follows for the Noyce Program

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57 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) “How to Write a Successful NSF Grant” (Part II) NISTS September 21, 2010 Eun-Woo Chang, Program Director Division of Undergraduate Education National Science Foundation

58 The Life Cycle of an NSF Proposal Proposal Preparation Processing and Notification Proposal Review and Recommendation 90 Days 6 Months 30 Days PI has an idea! Proposal Receipt at NSF NSF Admin. Review Award/ Decline? DD Concur Return Without Review Award ? Decline ? Notification DGA Notification Mail Panel Both Proposal Review

59 The Life Cycle of an NSF Proposal Proposal Preparation Processing and Notification Proposal Review and Recommendation 90 Days 6 Months 30 Days Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA) Target = Process 70% of proposals within 6 months of receipt at NSF

60 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Return Without Review The Proposal:  Does not address Intellectual Merits and Broader Impacts within the Project Summary  Has a budget line for a postdoctoral research associate but does not have a one page postdoctoral mentoring plan uploaded in the supporting information section  Does not meet an announced proposal deadline

61 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Review Processes Program directors - Sort by disciplines/college types/emphasis - Send to group of reviewers Reviewers - Rate each proposal (E, V, G, F, and P) - Submit written reviews - Describe the strengths and weaknesses in terms of the intellectual merit and broader impacts criteria

62 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Review Processes Review panel - Meets and discusses proposal - Writes a summary of the discussion - Highlight strengths and weaknesses - Referred to as the Panel Summary

63 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) The Proposal: Criteria for Evaluation - Peer Reviewed - Criteria for Evaluation - What is the intellectual merit of the proposed activity? - What are the broader impacts of the proposed activity?

64 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Intellectual Merit Addresses a major challenge Supported by capable faculty and others Improved student learning Rationale and vision clearly articulated Informed by other projects Effective evaluation and dissemination Adequate facilities, resources, and commitment Institutional and departmental commitment

65 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Broader Impacts Integrated into the institution’s academic programs Contributes to knowledge base and useful to other institutions Widely used products which can be disseminated through commercial and other channels Improved content and pedagogy for faculty and teachers Increased participation by women, underrepresented minorities, and persons with disabilities Ensures high quality STEM education for people pursuing careers in STEM fields or as teachers or technicians

66 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) WHAT MAKES A GOOD PROJECT? - REALISTIC - WORTHWHILE - WELL-PLANNED - INNOVATIVE

67 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Turning a Good Idea into a Competitive Proposal

68 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Scenario: Origin of a TUES Proposal Professor X has taught general chemistry at UNT for several semesters. She has an idea for greatly improving the course by adding “new stuff” - “New stuff” - Material (e. g., modules, web-based instruction) - Activities (e. g., laboratories, projects) - Pedagogy (e. g., problem based learning) She has done some preliminary evaluation She decides to prepare a CCLI proposal (Q) What should be stated in the proposal?

69 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Scenario: Professor X’s Initial Proposal Outline 1. Goals: Develop “new stuff” to enhance student learning at UNT 2. Rationale: Observed shortcomings in educational experience of the students at UNT and felt that new stuff would improve the situation 3. Project Description: Details of “new stuff“ 4. Evaluation: Use UNT’s course evaluation forms to show difference 5. Dissemination: Describe “new stuff“ using conference papers, journal articles, and web site

70 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Definition of Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes Goal: Broad, overarching statement of intention or ambition - A goal typically leads to several objectives Objective: Specific statement of intention - More focused and specific than goal - A objective may lead to one or more outcomes Outcome: Statement of expected result - Measurable with criteria for success *NOTE: No consistent definition of these terms

71 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) PD’s Response to Proposal Strategies Read the program solicitation Determine how your ideas match the solicitation and how you can improve the match Articulate goals, objectives, and outcomes Outcomes should include improved student learning Build on existing knowledge base Review the literature Present evidence that the “new stuff” is doable; will enhance learning; is the best approach Explore potential, meaningful collaborations

72 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) PD’s Response to Proposal Strategies Use data to document existing shortcomings in student learning Describe management plan Provide tasks, team responsibilities, timeline Provide clear examples of the approach Integrate the evaluation effort early Build assessment tools around defined objectives and expected outcomes Connect with independent evaluation experts

73 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) PD’s Response to Proposal Strategies Identify strategies for dissemination Define a plan to contribute to knowledge base Address broader impacts Collaborate, form partnerships (build community)

74 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Write Proposal to Answer Reviewers’ Questions What are you trying to accomplish? What will be the outcomes? Why do you believe that you have a good idea? Why is the problem important? Why is your approach promising? How will you manage the project to ensure success? How will you know if you succeed? How will others find out about your work? How will you interest them? How will you excite them? } Goals etc. }Rationale }Evaluation }Dissemination

75 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Strengths & Weaknesses Identified by Reviewers Pretend you analyzed a stack of panel summaries to identify the most commonly cited strengths and weaknesses List what you think will be - The four most frequently cited strengths - The four most frequently cited weaknesses

76 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Most Common Strengths

77 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Most Common Weaknesses

78 Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) “How to Write a Successful NSF Grant” NISTS September 21, 2010 Eun-Woo Chang, Program Director Division of Undergraduate Education National Science Foundation


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