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Presentation on theme: "Unit 3, Part 3 UNIT 3, Part 3 Issues of Identity Click the mouse button or press the space bar to continue."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Unit 3, Part 3 UNIT 3, Part 3 Issues of Identity Click the mouse button or press the space bar to continue

3 Unit 3, Part 3 MAIN MENU Issues of Identity (pages 664–695) We Are Family Click a selection title to go to the corresponding selection menu.

4 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family SELECTION MENU Before You Read Reading the Selection After You Read Selection Menu (pages 664–667)

5 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family BEFORE YOU READ In “We Are Family,” writer Chang-rae Lee comments on the unshakable bond between his relatives in Korea and himself. From the title, what do you think the author values? Skim the first paragraph. What mood do you think the author is trying to establish? Preview the Article

6 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family BEFORE YOU READ Read to discover Chang-rae Lee’s identification with his Korean family and culture. Set a Purpose for Reading

7 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family BEFORE YOU READ Analyzing Cultural Context When you analyze cultural context, you consider the customs, beliefs, values, arts, and intellectual activities of a group of people and use this knowledge to better understand the theme or message of a literary work.

8 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family BEFORE YOU READ To understand the cultural context of this selection, consider the cultural characteristics of the author’s experiences in Korea and in the United States. Analyzing Cultural Context

9 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family BEFORE YOU READ Reading Tip: Taking Notes As you read, take notes using a two-column chart like the one on the next slide. Analyzing Cultural Context

10 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family

11 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family Issues of Identity Consider the following idea as you read. As a Korean American, Lee lives in and experiences two cultures simultaneously. What are the ways in which Lee introduces his American readers to Korean culture? READING THE SELECTION

12 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family Answer: Lee makes several references to Korean food; he describes Korean burial practices; he refers to a “distinctive Korean mother-style scold. READING THE SELECTION

13 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family Issues of Identity Read the second complete paragraph on page 666. In what ways might being around his family in South Korea be a relief to Lee? READING THE SELECTION Answer: He implies that he does not have to explain himself “in customary ways” and that around his cousins, he did not feel like an “ethnic,” or an outsider.

14 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family

15 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Respond 1.Why do you think Lee opens his article with a description of his grandfather’s gravesite?

16 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Respond Answer: He is setting up the idea of family connections. He also introduces the topic of loss that is prevalent throughout the piece. He mentions the alienation he felt from knowing and not knowing his grandfather, which is similar to his relationships with many of his other relatives.

17 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret 2.(a) How did Lee react to the names of his late family members on the black granite headstone? (b) Why do you think this reaction is significant?

18 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret Answer: (a) Lee reacted in awe. He felt it was “remarkable” and “wonderful.” (b) It contrasts with his Korean relatives, who think of the tradition as ordinary, and shows how an outsider may have a richer appreciation of cultural traditions. It also emphasizes the theme of family bonds.

19 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret 3.(a) What might have made Lee feel like an outsider in the town in which he was raised? (b) How do you think being an outsider influenced Lee’s perspective on family?

20 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret Answer: (a) He was one of only a few Korean Americans in a mostly white American town. (b) It seemed to instill in him a greater longing to understand his heritage.

21 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family AFTER YOU READ Answer: His ties included his family, a taste for spicy food, and being able to understand some Korean. Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret 4.What were Lee’s ties to his Korean heritage?

22 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Analyze and Evaluate 5.(a) How does Lee approach the subject of loss in the article? (b) What does he learn or gain from his losses?

23 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Analyze and Evaluate Answer: (a) He speaks of the loss of some of his Korean relatives as well as of his mother. He also experiences a sense of loss because he does not speak Korean well and is not able to visit his Korean relatives often. (b) He learns the importance of family and cultural connections. He gains a sense of his identity.

24 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Analyze and Evaluate 6.Lee does not follow a traditional structure in his writing. It is not chronological or sequential. What techniques does he use to organize the article? Support your answer with examples from the text.

25 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Analyze and Evaluate Answer: He uses flashbacks—one is the memory of visiting his father’s grave, and another is the memory of his family in the state of New York. He uses images, such as those

26 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Connect 7.Lee comments that he did not have to explain himself to his relatives “as a teacher and writer and maybe (if there really is such a person) as an Asian American.” Why do you think he says this about the Asian American identity?

27 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family AFTER YOU READ Answer: He discusses how he straddles both worlds of being an American and a Korean. His connection to his Korean heritage is strong, despite the small amount of time he has spent in Korea. He finds being an Asian American a difficult identity to inhabit because he straddles two cultures. Responding and Thinking Critically Connect

28 Unit 3, Part 3 Time: We Are Family We Are Family

29 Unit 3, Part 3 Comparing Literature COMPARING LITERATURE MENU Click a selection title or feature to go to the corresponding section.

30 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem SELECTION MENU Before You Read Reading the Selection After You Read Selection Menu (pages 669–674)

31 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem BEFORE YOU READ Meet Langston Hughes Click the picture to learn about the author.

32 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem BEFORE YOU READ Most of Hughes’s poems are framed by his experiences of being an African American and a resident of Harlem during its cultural renaissance. Connecting to the Poems

33 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem BEFORE YOU READ Before you read the poems, think about the following questions: What does Hughes reveal about the African American experience during his time? How much power do published words have to bring about change in people’s lives? Connecting to the Poems

34 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem BEFORE YOU READ Hughes was a champion at using language to convey his thoughts. In his poems, he portrayed the African American experience in the mid 1900s. During this time, many African Americans had dreams that went unrealized because of racism. Hughes used poetry to provoke awareness of the many frustrations felt by African Americans. Building Background

35 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem BEFORE YOU READ As you read, notice how Hughes expresses his thoughts in a style that displays a distinctively African American musical quality, reminiscent of jazz music. Setting a Purpose for Reading Issues of Identity

36 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem Setting a Purpose for Reading BEFORE YOU READ Rhyme is the repetition of the same stressed vowel sounds and any succeeding sounds in two or more words. Rhyme scheme is the pattern that end rhymes (rhymes occurring at the ends of lines of poetry) form in a stanza or poem.. Rhyme and Rhyme Scheme

37 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem Setting a Purpose for Reading BEFORE YOU READ Rhyme scheme is designated by the assignment of a different letter of the alphabet to each new rhyme. As you read the poems, examine how Hughes uses rhyme and rhyme scheme to help him convey his message. Rhyme and Rhyme Scheme

38 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem BEFORE YOU READ Making Inferences About Theme To make inferences about theme is to draw a conclusion about the overall meaning of a literary work based on textual evidence and your background knowledge.

39 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem BEFORE YOU READ Making Inferences About Theme Making inferences, or “reading between the lines,” can increase your understanding of a poem’s central meaning. As you read, ask yourself questions about the main points to help you find the poem’s central meaning.

40 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem BEFORE YOU READ Reading Tip: Questioning Create a chart like the one on the next slide to organize your ideas through questioning as you read the poems. Making Inferences About Theme

41 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem BEFORE YOU READ Making Inferences About Theme

42 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem BEFORE YOU READ deferreddeferred v. put off, postponed (p. 673) Tom deferred his loan payment until he received a check from his employer. festerfester v. to become increasingly infected or inflamed, rot (p. 673) The man let the cut on his leg fester until he developed a dangerous infection. Click a vocabulary term to listen to the definition.

43 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem

44 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem Issues of Identity Keep the following questions in mind as you read. Who is the speaker in each poem? Where does the speaker search for identity? READING THE SELECTION Answer: The speaker may be Hughes himself. He seems to be searching for identity within music and dreams.

45 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem Making Inferences About Theme Read the text highlighted in blue on page 671. Why does the speaker ask if it’s “a happy beat” and if “something underneath” is heard? Reading Strategy READING THE SELECTION Answer: Because the beat is a blues for “a dream deferred”

46 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem Issues of Identity Read the text highlighted in tan on page 671. What do you think Hughes suggests in the concluding lines beginning with “I’m happy”? READING THE SELECTION Answer: The speaker finds solace or happiness in the boogie beat of his people, or the group with whom he identifies.

47 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem Rhyme and Rhyme Scheme Read the text highlighted in purple on page 672. What is the rhyme scheme in this stanza? Literary Element READING THE SELECTION Answer: The rhyme scheme is abcb. You should notice that the second and fourth lines rhyme.

48 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem Issues of Identity Read the last two lines of the poem on page 672. If the speaker wants to fight against the plight of African Americans in his time, why might he have this motto? READING THE SELECTION Answer: It sounds as if he believes in nonconfrontational methods rather than direct protest.

49 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem Issues of Identity Why would the people of Harlem defer their dreams? READING THE SELECTION Answer: They were forced into poor conditions by racial discrimination. They deferred their dreams to focus on day-to-day survival. There was neither time nor money to pursue their dreams.

50 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem Making Inferences about Theme Read the last line of the poem on page 673. How could an explosive dream be either positive or negative? READING THE SELECTION Answer: It could be positive if it were an instigator of social improvement, such as a revolution against an oppressive system. It could be negative if it resulted in a senseless and regrettable act of violence. Reading Strategy

51 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem

52 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem AFTER YOU READ Answer: You should reflect thoughtfully on the poems. Responding and Thinking Critically Respond 1.If you could ask Langston Hughes one question about his poetry, what would it be?

53 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem AFTER YOU READ Answer: (a) He “plays it cool and digs all jive.” (b) He does not lose his head and agrees with what people say. Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret 2.(a) In “Motto,” how does the speaker say that he stays alive? (b) What does this suggest to you about his situation in life?

54 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem AFTER YOU READ Answer: (a) “Dig And Be Dug/In Return.” (b) “Live and let live.” Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret 3.(a) In “Motto,” what are the speaker’s actual words for the motto? (b) Rephrase the motto in your own words.

55 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem AFTER YOU READ Answer: (a) “Or does it explode?” (b) Deferred dreams could result in violent action. Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret 4.(a) What is the final question in “Harlem”? (b) What might this question mean?

56 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem AFTER YOU READ Answer: (a) “You think / “It’s a happy beat?” and, “What did I say?” (b) They suggest that the beat is not actually “happy.” Responding and Thinking Critically Analyze and Evaluate 5.(a) In “Dream Boogie,” what questions does the speaker ask the audience? (b) What is their effect on the poem? Explain.

57 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem AFTER YOU READ Answer: The images are distasteful and therefore apt. Responding and Thinking Critically Analyze and Evaluate 6.In “Harlem,” how effective are the images Hughes creates in conveying what happens to a “dream deferred”?

58 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem AFTER YOU READ Answer: To hold the reader’s attention and enhance the rhythm. Responding and Thinking Critically Analyze and Evaluate 7.In “Dream Boogie,” why does Hughes deviate from the rhyme scheme in some lines of the poem?

59 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem AFTER YOU READ Answer: Hughes is talking about the dreams of individuals, African American people, and the residents of Harlem. Responding and Thinking Critically Connect 8.What does Hughes mean when he refers to a deferred dream? Explain. Issues of Identity

60 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem AFTER YOU READ Rhyme and Rhyme Scheme Many different types of rhyme schemes exist in poetry. Established poets such as Hughes can take liberties with rhyme scheme for added meaning and innovation.

61 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem AFTER YOU READ Answer: Rhetorical questions rhyme and include similes. 1.How is simile used as part of the rhyme scheme in “Harlem”? Rhyme and Rhyme Scheme

62 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem AFTER YOU READ Answer: They connect the reader to the sounds of Harlem. 2.How do you think the rhyme schemes affect the meanings of Hughes’s poems? Rhyme and Rhyme Scheme

63 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem AFTER YOU READ Evaluate Author’s Craft In these poems, Hughes conveys his ideas about African American life in a jazz beat style. Write an essay describing this technique as Hughes applies it. Include your opinion of whether or not you think his presentation is effective. Writing About Literature

64 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem AFTER YOU READ Refer to ideas, phrases, and lines from each of the three poems you have read. When you have finished your draft, exchange it with another student. Evaluate each other’s work and suggest revisions. Then proofread and edit your draft for errors in spelling, grammar, and punctuation. Writing About Literature

65 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem AFTER YOU READ Looking at the words and phrases in a poem can help you make inferences about theme. A poet may convey his or her ideas in subtle ways. As you read, pay attention to the style of each poem. Think about meanings that are implied but not stated. Making Inferences About Theme

66 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem AFTER YOU READ Making Inferences About Theme Answer: The deferred dreams of people, specifically African Americans confined because of racial prejudice. 1.What theme is conveyed in this body of poetry?

67 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem AFTER YOU READ Making Inferences About Theme Answer: Possible detail: “Or does it explode?” 2.In support of your opinion, list two details from the poems.

68 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem AFTER YOU READ Practice Practice with Word Parts Your knowledge of word roots can help you understand unfamiliar words. Read the roots and definitions on the next slide. Then use your knowledge of roots, prefixes, and suffixes to pick the best definition for each vocabulary word.

69 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem AFTER YOU READ Latin Root: deferred—“to carry away” or “to transfer” Latin Root: fistula—“pipe, ulcer” Practice

70 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem AFTER YOU READ 1.Vijay deferred his plans of becoming a rock star until after he finished college. A.postponed B.abandoned C.followed Practice

71 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem AFTER YOU READ 2.My mother put antibiotic cream on my cut to ensure that the wound would not fester. A.frighten B.heal C.become infected Practice

72 Unit 3, Part 3 Dream Boogie, Motto & Harlem

73 Unit 3, Part 3 Jazz Fan Looks Back SELECTION MENU Before You Read Reading the Selection Selection Menu (pages 675–676)

74 Unit 3, Part 3 Jazz Fan Looks Back BEFORE YOU READ African American artists and writers, such as Maya Angelou, highly regard poet Jayne Cortez as a voice of her culture and era. Critics have praised Cortez because she “forged connections in her work that help us see how our histories are related.” Much of her poetry addresses social problems in the United States and the world. Building Background

75 Unit 3, Part 3 Jazz Fan Looks Back BEFORE YOU READ Cortez was born in Arizona, raised in California, and now lives in New York City. She has written ten books of poetry and her poems have been translated into twenty- eight languages. Additionally, she founded her own publishing company, Bola Press, in Cortez’s many awards and honors include the American Book Award, the International African Festival Award, and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York Foundation for the Arts. Building Background

76 Unit 3, Part 3 Jazz Fan Looks Back BEFORE YOU READ Music is part of both Cortez’s personal and professional life. Her husband, Ornette Coleman, is a jazz musician. Cortez herself is a member of a jazz and funk band, The Firespitters, whose other members include her son, Denardo. In fact, Cortez does not just write and publish her poetry: she also performs it with The Firespitters, with whom she has released nine recordings. Building Background

77 Unit 3, Part 3 Jazz Fan Looks Back BEFORE YOU READ In “Jazz Fan Looks Back,” Cortez displays her impressive knowledge of jazz music and history. In the poem, she cleverly associates several jazz musicians with some of their most popular compositions or tunes that they were known for playing. For example, the first line of the poem contains an allusion to jazz composer and pianist Thelonius Monk and his composition “Criss Cross.” Building Background

78 Unit 3, Part 3 Jazz Fan Looks Back BEFORE YOU READ She also refers to jazz pianist Bud Powell and his composition “Wail,” saxophonist Sonny Stitt and his frequent tune “Count Every Star,” and trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie and his composition “Groovin’ High.” In other lines, she skillfully relates musicians and their memorable personalities, behaviors, or talents: she references the gardenia flower that singer Billie Holiday was famous for wearing in her hair while performing and the wide vocal range that singer Dinah Washington could “scream.” Building Background

79 Unit 3, Part 3 Jazz Fan Looks Back BEFORE YOU READ Finally, she clues her audience into the nicknames of other famous jazz artists: saxophonist and bandleader Charlie “Bird” Parker, tenor saxophonist Coleman “Hawk” Hawkins, and trumpeter “Fats” Navarro. To complete the mood of a jazz fan reminiscing, she mentions the Shrine Auditorium, a famous venue in Los Angeles. Building Background

80 Unit 3, Part 3 Jazz Fan Looks Back

81 Unit 3, Part 3 Jazz Fan Looks Back Issues of Identity Keep the following question in mind as you read. How is the speaker’s identity intertwined with music? READING THE SELECTION Answer: The speaker’s identity seems wrapped up in music; the speaker is such a dedicated jazz fan that she feels as if she participates in the playing of the music with the musicians.

82 Unit 3, Part 3 Jazz Fan Looks Back

83 Unit 3, Part 3 Dizzie Gillespie, Explorer of New Sounds SELECTION MENU Before You Read Reading the Selection Selection Menu (pages 677–680)

84 Unit 3, Part 3 Dizzie Gillespie, Explorer of New Sounds BEFORE YOU READ Studs Terkel is a New York City-born writer. After moving to Chicago, he began his career writing radio shows and ads, eventually hosting his own radio interview series. The show became a place for Terkel to highlight his love for all kinds of music, from jazz to blues to opera. Building Background

85 Unit 3, Part 3 Dizzie Gillespie, Explorer of New Sounds BEFORE YOU READ Giants of Jazz, from which this Dizzy Gillespie chapter is taken, was Terkel’s first book. It contains biographies of thirteen jazz greats. Giants of Jazz was reprinted in 2002 and still sells well, fifty years after its initial publication. Studs Terkel continues to write, interview, and maintain a public presence. Studs Terkel was born in Building Background

86 Unit 3, Part 3 Dizzie Gillespie, Explorer of New Sounds

87 Unit 3, Part 3 Dizzie Gillespie, Explorer of New Sounds Issues of Identity Keep the following questions in mind as you read. What does it take to become a successful musician? How can innovation be difficult? READING THE SELECTION Answer: You might say it takes hard work, persistence, and spirit to become a successful musician. Innovation can be difficult because of rejection.

88 Unit 3, Part 3 Dizzie Gillespie, Explorer of New Sounds Issues of Identity How might exposure to so many other artists help Gillespie form his own identity as a musician? READING THE SELECTION Answer: He could bring a new sound and depth to a musical style steeped in tradition. By developing his own unique sound and influencing others, Gillespie’s name could become associated with a style of music.

89 Unit 3, Part 3 Dizzie Gillespie, Explorer of New Sounds Look at the photograph on page 679. Why might Gillespie’s innovative style have irritated some musicians? READING THE SELECTION Viewing the Art

90 Unit 3, Part 3 Dizzie Gillespie, Explorer of New Sounds Answer: They were surprised by his inventiveness. They were so rooted in tradition that they didn’t like the sound of something new. Perhaps they thought he was showing off. Perhaps they were just jealous of his ability. READING THE SELECTION Viewing the Art

91 Unit 3, Part 3 Dizzie Gillespie, Explorer of New Sounds Making Inferences about Theme What can you infer about the theme based on Terkel’s inclusion of this quotation? READING THE SELECTION Answer: Terkel wants to make the point that Gillespie was a man of the people and a believer in the unifying powers of music. Reading Strategy

92 Unit 3, Part 3 Dizzie Gillespie, Explorer of New Sounds

93 Unit 3, Part 3 Playing Jazz SELECTION MENU Before You Read Reading the Selection Selection Menu (pages 681 –684)

94 Unit 3, Part 3 Playing Jazz BEFORE YOU READ Eight-time Grammy Award winner Wynton Marsalis is arguably one of the best jazz musicians and trumpeters today. Building Background

95 Unit 3, Part 3 Playing Jazz BEFORE YOU READ A classical musician as well, he has recorded the music of Bach, Beethoven, and Mozart to great critical acclaim. He has also played with some of the most highly regarded orchestras in the United States and the world. Building Background

96 Unit 3, Part 3 Playing Jazz BEFORE YOU READ Marsalis began publicly performing traditional New Orleans jazz when he was just eight years old. Marsalis describes his music as being the sound of democracy, a concept he was introduced to by jazz great Art Blakey. According to Marsalis, “The jazz band works best when participation is shaped by intelligent communication.” His jazz artistry continues to inspire budding musicians today. Building Background

97 Unit 3, Part 3 Playing Jazz

98 Unit 3, Part 3 Playing Jazz Issues of Identity Keep the following questions in mind as you read. How can I apply Marsalis’s “bases” to my own interests? READING THE SELECTION Answer: Answers will vary. The “bases” are applicable to pretty much anything.

99 Unit 3, Part 3 Playing Jazz Issues of Identity Read the second complete paragraph on page 683. According to Marsalis, how is good music connected to identity? READING THE SELECTION Answer: Music is made good by the player’s unique approach to playing. This unique approach is the musician’s identity.

100 Unit 3, Part 3 Playing Jazz Making Inferences about Theme Read the fifth complete paragraph on page 683. What might Marsalis be trying to accomplish by corresponding with a young musician? READING THE SELECTION Reading Strategy

101 Unit 3, Part 3 Playing Jazz Answer: Some may say that Marsalis wants to tap into the uninhibited freedom of expression the younger musician may still have. Others may say that Marsalis wants to impart the valuable wisdom he has learned over the years. READING THE SELECTION Reading Strategy

102 Unit 3, Part 3 Playing Jazz Issues of Identity Read the first complete paragraph on page 684. Marsalis calls swing “a democratic and quintessential American concept.” What might he mean by this? READING THE SELECTION

103 Unit 3, Part 3 Playing Jazz Answer: Swing involves individual and highly personal expression as well as maintaining identity in the face of change. Playing swing in an ensemble creates a constantly shifting balance of power to which all members contribute. READING THE SELECTION

104 Unit 3, Part 3 Playing Jazz

105 Unit 3, Part 3 Wrap-up: Comparing Literature Across Genres Comparing the Issues of Identity Writing Jazz may be the only major art form that truly originated in the United States. Jazz involves several forms of music—African rhythms and American band music—blended with some European influence. WRAP-UP

106 Unit 3, Part 3 Wrap-up: Comparing Literature Across Genres Comparing the Issues of Identity The best jazz music involves improvisation. Creating new music during a performance is what tends to separate the true jazz musician from those who can play only the notes written in a musical score. WRAP-UP

107 Unit 3, Part 3 Wrap-up: Comparing Literature Across Genres Comparing the Issues of Identity Many musicians, as well as aficionados, have found their identities in jazz. Think about the selections you have just read. Compare these writers in terms of the subjects they discuss. Are the writers alike in some ways? What makes each writer unique? How has music, specifically jazz, affected each writer? WRAP-UP

108 Unit 3, Part 3 Wrap-up: Comparing Literature Across Genres Comparing Sound Devices Group Activity Sound devices are techniques used by a writer to make a literary work more appealing to the ear. Form small groups to discuss the questions on the following slides. WRAP-UP

109 Unit 3, Part 3 Wrap-up: Comparing Literature Across Genres Comparing Sound Devices 1.What sound devices did you notice in the poetry you read? How do you feel about each poet’s use of sound devices and rhyme schemes? WRAP-UP

110 Unit 3, Part 3 Wrap-up: Comparing Literature Across Genres Comparing Sound Devices Answer: Some may mention that “Dream Boogie” is written with a jazzlike beat, “Harlem” has an unusual rhyme scheme, and Cortez’s poem is composed of lines that are constructed according to tidbits of information. You should give reasons for your opinions. WRAP-UP

111 Unit 3, Part 3 Wrap-up: Comparing Literature Across Genres Comparing Sound Devices 2.Which lines did you especially like in the poems you read? Which lines, if any, did you read more than once? In what ways were those lines especially pleasing to the ear? Answer: You should cite specific details. WRAP-UP

112 Unit 3, Part 3 Wrap-up: Comparing Literature Across Genres Comparing Sound Devices 3.In your opinion, which of the selections was the most appealing? Explain. Answer: Choices should be supported by reasons. WRAP-UP

113 Unit 3, Part 3 Wrap-up: Comparing Literature Across Genres Comparing Author’s Purpose Partner Activity Which of the authors, poems, and passages in this lesson had the greatest impact on you? With a partner, discuss your ideas about questions on the following slides. WRAP-UP

114 Unit 3, Part 3 Wrap-up: Comparing Literature Across Genres Comparing Author’s Purpose 1.What will you remember from the readings in this section? Answer: There is a rich history in jazz music, and many famous people have been involved with jazz. Those who are involved with jazz seem to love what they are doing, and they feel as though it is a huge part of their identity. WRAP-UP

115 Unit 3, Part 3 Wrap-up: Comparing Literature Across Genres Comparing Author’s Purpose 2.What did these readings teach you? Answer: The thoughts and experiences of other people can provide insight. You may suggest, for example, that the poems of Langston Hughes increased your understanding of social issues. WRAP-UP

116 Unit 3, Part 3 Wrap-up: Comparing Literature Across Genres Comparing Author’s Purpose 3.What further questions do you have about someone or something mentioned in these selections? WRAP-UP

117 Unit 3, Part 3 Wrap-up: Comparing Literature Across Genres Comparing Author’s Purpose Answer: You should offer specific questions about a subject or writer, such as how Wynton Marsalis began his letter- writing friendship with young Anthony, or what Dizzy Gillespie found most difficult about his success as a trumpeter. WRAP-UP

118 Unit 3, Part 3 Wrap-up: Comparing Literature Across Genres

119 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop Connecting to Literature In Gwendolyn Brooks’s poem, the speaker reflects on the lessons animals can teach us if we pay attention. Poems often present reflections— understandings and interpretations of experiences. WRITING WORKSHOP Reflecting on an Observation Reflective Essay

120 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop Essays can do the same thing in paragraph form: look back, find significance, and present it in a meaningful and interesting way to an audience. In a reflective essay, you narrate and describe an experience or observation to show its effect on you. To write a successful reflective essay, begin by reading the goals and strategies on the next slide. WRITING WORKSHOP Reflecting on an Observation Reflective Essay

121 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Taking a Biographical or Historical Approach Reflective Essay Rubric: Features of Reflective Essays

122 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop Assignment WRITING WORKSHOP Taking a Biographical or Historical Approach Write a reflection on an observation you have made or an experience you have had. As you move through the stages of the writing process, keep your audience and purpose in mind. Audience: classmates and peers Purpose: to explore the meaning and effect of a personal observation or experience Reflective Essay

123 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Analyzing a Professional Model In the reflective essay on pages 687–688 of your textbook, Joy Harjo finds her voice in both poetry and prose. As you read this reflection on the writer’s deep, life-changing experience of hearing jazz for the first time, identify the narrative elements in the essay, as well as the ways in which descriptive details make the essay come alive. Pay close attention to the comments in the margin; they point out features that you might want to include in your own reflective essay. Reflective Essay

124 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Analyzing a Professional Model Reading-Writing Connection Think about the writing techniques that you have just encountered and try them out in the reflective essay you write. Reflective Essay

125 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Prewriting Find a Topic You need to go back into your past to find a topic. Do this by thinking about different periods of your life. Record important experiences that occurred during each time frame. Be sure that you can find some meaning or significance in each event you list. Then choose the specific memory you like best. Reflective Essay

126 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Prewriting List Details Once you have found a topic for writing, list details that seem to bring that experience or observation to life. You can use a cluster diagram, like the one on the next slide, for this purpose. Write your topic in the center and then list the associations, including sensory details, that you have with the experience. Reflective Essay

127 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Prewriting Reflective Essay

128 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Prewriting Make a Plan for Writing Your next step is to outline or organize your ideas for writing. One way to do this is by thinking out ideas for the beginning, middle, and end of your reflective essay. Draw a chart, or divide a piece of paper into three rows, and include the following information in each section: Reflective Essay

129 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Prewriting ►Beginning—The beginning of your reflective essay should accomplish the same goals that the beginning of any narrative accomplishes: it may provide important details about the time and place, introduce the characters or people who were important in the experience or observation, or start the action. Reflective Essay

130 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Prewriting ►Middle—The middle of your reflective essay should tell what happened. It may present a series of events or give the details of just one event. ►End—The end of your reflective essay should accomplish two goals: it should bring the action or events to a close in some way, and it should also state the meaning or significance of the experience. Reflective Essay

131 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Prewriting Talk About Your Ideas Meet with a partner. Explain what your topic is and the significance of the experience you have chosen. Then review your organizational plan with your partner. To develop your writing voice, listen to your speaking voice now as you express the meaning of the experience or its effect on you. Work with your partner to identify words and phrases that reflect your voice and then jot them down. Reflective Essay

132 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Drafting Create a Structure As you write your ideas on paper in the form of sentences and paragraphs, remember that your essay should have a clear beginning, middle, and end. In some cases, you may be able to achieve this in just three paragraphs, one for each part of this essay. It is also fine to develop two or more paragraphs for the middle of your reflective essay and to add a full paragraph of reflection after the narrative. Reflective Essay

133 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Drafting Analyzing a Workshop Model Read the final draft of the reflective essay on pages of your text book. Read the essay and answer the questions in the margin. Use the answers to these questions to guide you as you write. Reflective Essay

134 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Revising Peer Review When you finish your draft, have a peer reviewer read it. Ask him or her to identify narrative and descriptive elements in your writing. Then ask your reviewer to make suggestions about where to add background information, sensory details, or reflection. Also ask your reviewer to study the traits of strong writing, and to think about how they apply to your work. Reflective Essay

135 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Revising Use the rubric below to help you evaluate your writing. Reflective Essay

136 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Using Sensory Details Sensory details are words or phrases that appeal to one of the five senses. It is never necessary to use sensory details that appeal to all five senses— especially when they simply do not fit! Sensory details that are appropriate for the time, characters, place, and events enrich any narrative, however. Note how well-chosen sensory details improve the passage from the Workshop Model on the following slides. Reflective Essay

137 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Using Sensory Details Draft: These students were doing everything we had been told to do. Reflective Essay

138 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Using Sensory Details Revision: Reflective Essay Chatting quietly, 1 these students were noticing the separate daytime and nighttime areas for the chimps, as well as their ropes, swings, and hammocks. 2 Some were also listening to the various hoots and calls, 3 while others sketched the animals. 1: Appeals to Hearing 2: Appeals to Sight 3: Appeals to Hearing

139 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Editing and Proofreading Get It Right When you have completed the final draft of your story, proofread it for errors in grammar, usage, mechanics, and spelling Correcting: Unclear Pronoun Reference A pronoun must refer to a noun or another pronoun. Often, it refers to a noun that appears earlier in the sentence. To be clear, it should refer to the closest noun or pronoun in the sentence or a previous sentence. On the next slides are examples of unclear pronoun references and corrections. Reflective Essay

140 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Correcting Unclear Pronoun References Problem: Unclear Pronoun Reference The pronoun them refers to the antecedent the visitors and the chimp, yet the writer intends the pronoun them to refer to the mask. [He] then made a second mask. In a few minutes, the visitors and the chimp were looking at each other through them. Reflective Essay

141 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Correcting Unclear Pronoun References Solution A: Replace the pronoun with the exact noun to which it refers. He then made a second mask, In a few minutes, one visitor looked through it at the chimp while the chimp eyed the visitor through the first mask. Reflective Essay

142 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Correcting Unclear Pronoun References Solution B: Rewrite the sentence so that the pronoun clearly refers to a previous noun or pronoun. He then made a second mask. In a few minutes, one visitor looked through it at the chimp while the chimp eyed the visitor through the first mask. Reflective Essay

143 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Correcting Unclear Pronoun References Problem: Unclear Pronoun Reference The pronoun They does not refer to any specific person, place, or thing. They say that chimps have a lot to tell us, so I plan on learning more about them. Solution: Rewrite the sentence to eliminate the pronoun. Whatever chimps may have to tell us, I plan on finding out. Reflective Essay

144 Unit 3, Part 3 Writing Workshop WRITING WORKSHOP Presenting Do not Rely on Your Spell-check Feature Never rely on a computer’s spell-check feature to do the whole job of proofreading. A spell-checker has limited use, because it cannot distinguish certain kinds of errors, such as misused homonyms. After using the spell-checker, reread your paper to catch additional errors. Reflective Essay

145 Unit 3, Part 3 Speaking, Listening, and Viewing Workshop SPEAKING, LISTENING, AND VIEWING WORKSHOP Presenting a Reflective Essay Connecting to Literature Poet Joy Harjo expresses herself and her Cherokee and Creek heritage through music, art, and words. She has a band called Poetic Justice; she also paints and pursues other visual arts. According to Harjo, she approaches the art of poetry as a visual artist. In fact, any written work can be delivered, changed, or enhanced with the addition of visual aids and music. In this workshop, you will present a reflection that uses visuals to help express the events and their significance. Reflection

146 Unit 3, Part 3 Speaking, Listening, and Viewing Workshop SPEAKING, LISTENING, AND VIEWING WORKSHOP Presenting a Reflective Essay Reflection Assignment Create an oral presentation of your reflective essay about an observation and deliver it to an audience.

147 Unit 3, Part 3 Speaking, Listening, and Viewing Workshop SPEAKING, LISTENING, AND VIEWING WORKSHOP Planning Your Presentation Reflection Presenting an essay orally is not the same thing as simply reading it aloud. It is a chance to use your voice, body language, and visual aids to communicate meaning to an audience in a way that involves both listening and viewing. Begin by reading your essay aloud to yourself. As you read, think about your audience. Ask yourself which parts of your essay will be most interesting, which will be hardest to understand, and which might lend themselves to visual interpretation.

148 Unit 3, Part 3 Speaking, Listening, and Viewing Workshop SPEAKING, LISTENING, AND VIEWING WORKSHOP Planning Your Presentation Reflection Next, make notes. For example, circle or highlight the details, the dialogue, and the descriptions that you consider most effective and important. Underline anything that you think can be cut, needs more explanation, or will drag down your presentation. Jot down ideas for visuals in the margins.

149 Unit 3, Part 3 Speaking, Listening, and Viewing Workshop SPEAKING, LISTENING, AND VIEWING WORKSHOP Planning Your Presentation Reflection Revise your essay to make it a spoken script. In the script, retain all of your best details, dialogue, and descriptions. Expand them and enliven them. Omit details that contribute little to an overall impression or a theme. Add brief, interesting bits of explanation wherever they are needed. Finally, make note cards. After you rehearse and learn your presentation, these cards will serve as reminders or cues during your delivery.

150 Unit 3, Part 3 Speaking, Listening, and Viewing Workshop SPEAKING, LISTENING, AND VIEWING WORKSHOP Creating Your Visual Media Reflection As you create your script and note cards, concentrate on the images you want to display or project. There are many options for visual aids—drawings, collages, photographs, and video. You can also incorporate colors, shapes, and designs into your project to represent a feeling or mood.

151 Unit 3, Part 3 Speaking, Listening, and Viewing Workshop SPEAKING, LISTENING, AND VIEWING WORKSHOP Creating Your Visual Media Reflection Because you are telling a story, one way to plan your visuals is by sequencing images along a plot diagram.

152 Unit 3, Part 3 Speaking, Listening, and Viewing Workshop SPEAKING, LISTENING, AND VIEWING WORKSHOP Creating Your Visual Media Reflection Once you have a plan, assemble your images in order and write brief prompts on your note cards that cue you to display each one at the right time.

153 Unit 3, Part 3 Speaking, Listening, and Viewing Workshop SPEAKING, LISTENING, AND VIEWING WORKSHOP Rehearsing Reflection Never deliver an oral presentation without rehearsing it several times. ►You can rehearse your presentation the first few times by yourself. Get used to using your note cards as prompts and learn your presentation thoroughly. Be sure to practice the actual gestures you will use.

154 Unit 3, Part 3 Speaking, Listening, and Viewing Workshop SPEAKING, LISTENING, AND VIEWING WORKSHOP Rehearsing Reflection ►Next, practice in front of a classmate or a family member. Ask your listener to comment on the effectiveness of each of the verbal and nonverbal techniques listed in the chart on the next slide. If possible, rehearse once more in front of the same person, incorporating his or her suggestions.

155 Unit 3, Part 3 Speaking, Listening, and Viewing Workshop SPEAKING, LISTENING, AND VIEWING WORKSHOP Rehearsing Reflection

156 Unit 3, Part 3 Write some common mottoes on the board, such as “Be prepared,” “Look before you leap,” and so on. Unit 3, Part 3 BELLRINGER Do you agree with these mottoes? Do you have your own motto? Does having a motto help you make decisions?

157 Unit 3, Part 3 BELLRINGER OPTION TRANSPARENCY Click on the image to see a full version of the Bellringer Option Transparency.

158 Unit 3, Part 3 A.a secret beat B.somebody walking up C.feet beating out D.a dream deferred In “Dream Boogie,” what does the speaker say one can hear if he or she listens closely? CHECKPOINT QUESTIONS Dream Boogie, Motto, and Harlem Checkpoint

159 Unit 3, Part 3 A.The identify the words of a different speaker. B.They represent the thoughts of the speaker. C.They are the words to the song the speaker is listening to. D.They are the voices coming from a radio. What purpose do the italics take in “Dream Boogie”? CHECKPOINT QUESTIONS Dream Boogie, Motto, and Harlem Checkpoint

160 Unit 3, Part 3 A.from a book B.from a song C.from living and learning D.from friends In “Motto,” how did the speaker get his motto? CHECKPOINT QUESTIONS Dream Boogie, Motto, and Harlem Checkpoint

161 Unit 3, Part 3 A.They describe foods. B.They describe sweet things. C.They describe smells. D.They are heat related. In “Harlem,” what do the first three possibilities of what might happen to deferred dreams have in common? CHECKPOINT QUESTIONS Dream Boogie, Motto, and Harlem Checkpoint

162 Unit 3, Part 3 A.in a jazz club B.on 52 nd street C.at the Apollo Theater D.at the shrine Auditorium Where did the speaker scat with Ella Fitzgerald? CHECKPOINT QUESTIONS Jazz Fan Looks Back Checkpoint

163 Unit 3, Part 3 A.Diz B.Bird C.Max D.Monk With whom did the speaker groove high? CHECKPOINT QUESTIONS Jazz Fan Looks Back Checkpoint

164 Unit 3, Part 3 A.Dizzy’s father owned a music store. B.Dizzy wanted to learn how to play as many instruments as possible. C.Dizzy’s father was guardian of his bands mates’ instruments. D.Dizzy’s father was a collector of antique instruments. Why was the Gillespie house strewn with musical instruments? CHECKPOINT QUESTIONS Dizzie Gillespie, Explorer of New Sounds Checkpoint

165 Unit 3, Part 3 A.The piano made the most noise with the least amount of effort. B.He liked the colors of the keyboard. C.He was captivated with the softness of the piano notes. D.He liked to use the pedals as well as the keys. What did Dizzy find appealing about the piano? CHECKPOINT QUESTIONS Dizzie Gillespie, Explorer of New Sounds Checkpoint

166 Unit 3, Part 3 A.His lungs and breathing technique weakened. B.His fingers cramped from playing too much. C.He developed problems with his mouth. D.He could only play in one key. What problem did Dizzy Gillespie develop as he became more proficient at the trumpet? CHECKPOINT QUESTIONS Dizzie Gillespie, Explorer of New Sounds Checkpoint

167 Unit 3, Part 3 A.He often became light-headed from playing the trumpet. B.He liked pranks and was well known for his fun loving ways. C.He was once hit on the head and lost consciousness. D.His musical style was often described as weird, or “dizzy.” How did John Birks Gillespie earn the nickname Dizzy? CHECKPOINT QUESTIONS Dizzie Gillespie, Explorer of New Sounds Checkpoint

168 Unit 3, Part 3 A.playing in Cab Calloway’s band B.developing a new style of jazz C.his tour of the Middle East in 1956 D.his work with Charlie Parker What does Terkei say was the highlight of Gillespie’s career? CHECKPOINT QUESTIONS Dizzie Gillespie, Explorer of New Sounds Checkpoint

169 Unit 3, Part 3 A.if he or she does not like the people B.a dislike of food C.if he or she is shy D.a distrust of modern transportation What according to Marsalis, will cause a touring musician to be lonely? CHECKPOINT QUESTIONS Playing Jazz Checkpoint

170 Unit 3, Part 3 A.Sociology B.Geography C.Etymology D.Anthropology Studying the vocabulary of music is like what, according to Marsalis? CHECKPOINT QUESTIONS Playing Jazz Checkpoint

171 Unit 3, Part 3 A.a belief in the integrity of their groove B.soul C.a richer musical vocabulary D.musicianship What quality does Marsalis argue many good Latin bands have that many jazz bands often lack? CHECKPOINT QUESTIONS Playing Jazz Checkpoint

172 Unit 3, Part 3 A.the trumpet player B.Charlie Parker C.the piano player D.the drummer Who according to Marsalis, is usually the president of the swing? CHECKPOINT QUESTIONS Playing Jazz Checkpoint

173 Unit 3, Part 3 ►Literary Terms HandbookLiterary Terms Handbook ►Reading HandbookReading Handbook ►FoldablesFoldables ►Writing HandbookWriting Handbook ►Business WritingBusiness Writing ►Language HandbookLanguage Handbook ►Test-Taking Skills HandbookTest-Taking Skills Handbook ►Daily Language Practice TransparenciesDaily Language Practice Transparencies Unit 3, Part 3 REFERENCE ►Grammar and Writing Workshop TransparenciesGrammar and Writing Workshop Transparencies

174 Unit 3, Part 3 Help To navigate within this Presentation Plus! product: Click the Forward button to go to the next slide. Click the Previous button to return to the previous slide. Click the Section Back button to return to the beginning of the section you are in. If you are viewing a feature, this button returns you to the main presentation. Click the Home button to return to the Chapter Menu. Click the Help button to access this screen. Click the Speaker button to listen to available audio. Click the Speaker Off button to stop any playing audio. Click the Exit button or press the Escape key [Esc] to end the chapter slide show. Presentation Plus! features such as the Reference Handbook, Literature Online, and others are located in the left margin of most screens. Click on any of these buttons to access a specific feature. Unit 3, Part 3 HELP


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