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Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Chapter 2 Becoming a Successful Student.

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1 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Chapter 2 Becoming a Successful Student

2 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. The purpose of this chapter is to learn skills to develop and maintain motivation to meet the challenges of college.

3 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Are you ready?

4 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Learning Outcomes   Identify sources of motivation.   Use visualization as a source of motivation.   Construct your own visions of success.   Develop specific plans to complete longer-term tasks.   Make appropriate time for recreation and fun.   Learn strategies for creating a successful self-image.   Seek and foster support from friends and family.   Seek out good role models.   Use self-talk for motivation.   Use self-discipline to stay on track with your educational goals.

5 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. The worlds of thought and action overlap. What you think has a way of becoming true. —Roger von Oech Creativity expert and writer What did von Oech mean?

6 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Motivation Factors  Can create positive or negative motivation, depending on your direction. VisionGoals PlansSelf-Esteem Self-TalkRole models Self-DisciplineFamily and friends support  Each of the above supports and energizes the others.  Which of the above motivate you most to meet the challenges in college?

7 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Visualization  Developing Your Image of the Possibilities Dr. Denis Waitley, author of Psychology of Success, describes visualization as a mental simulation.  In his book, Dr. Waitley describes a visualization experiment conducted with three groups of high school basketball players.

8 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Three Experimental Groups  Group 1 was told not to practice free throws for one month.  Group 2 was told to practice free throw shooting every afternoon for one hour for one month.  Group 3 was told to practice free throw shooting in their imagination every afternoon for one hour for one month.

9 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Experiment Results  Group 1 (skipped free throw practice for a month) slipped in their percentage of free throws.  Group 2 (with actual practice) improved.  Group 3 (using mental simulation/visualization alone) improved the most.

10 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Create Your Motivating Vision for College  Understand how your education relates to your career.  Believe that your education is valuable and worthwhile.  Write/create your vision for staying motivated in college.

11 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. -Small Group Discussion- Think about it! We choose if and how we visualize the future. 1. How does a clear and positive vision help you succeed? 2. Discuss and list the similarities between visualization and planning.  Inspire Success  Practice Visualizing what you want to accomplish!

12 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. SELF-TALK: The Inner Conversations We Have with Ourselves = Programming  Hand-in-hand with visualization is the concept of self-talk.  In the same way that we choose if and how we visualize the future, we also choose the way we think about the present and future.

13 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Self-Talk  Includes thoughts, ideas, feelings, impressions, and wordless physical responses, like fear.  Mostly unconscious.  The longer you have bought the thought, the “truer” it is = programming.  Researchers estimate that 75% is negative.  We’re engaged in a nearly constant monologue with ourselves.  Give an example of what is meant in the previous sentence.

14 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Rules of Self-Talk 1.The human brain is a physiological organ which through a specific electrochemical process collects, processes, stores, and acts on information it receives.

15 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Rules of Self-Talk continued 2.Self-talk/thoughts cause the brain to:  Release appropriate control chemicals into the body.  Alert the nervous system to any required response or action.  Store the thought/impression for future use.

16 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Rules of Self-Talk continued 3.Information presented to the subconscious mind triggers both a physical response and a psychological response. Discussion Question  Think About It! What happens when we continually say,  “I can’t do math.” OR  “I can’t write.” OR  other similar negative self-talk?

17 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Rules of Self-Talk continued 4.Every thought you think has an effect on the entire “you” whether you are aware of it or not. 5.Any information presented to the subconscious mind is linked to, and affected by, previously stored information.  Any new program you receive is compared with, and modified by, every old program you have stored.

18 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Rules of Self-Talk continued 6.The subconscious mind is a neutral mechanism which responds to information without subjective regard for its accuracy or its value.  It will, if you program it properly, tell you what’s right and wrong.  You can present it with new programs to override or replace old programs.

19 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Rules of Self-Talk continued 7.The subconscious mind holds no beliefs or biases other than those which it receives as a result of programming.

20 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Rules of Self-Talk continued 8.When faced with two or more programs that are in conflict with each other, the subconscious mind will attempt to act on the program which is the strongest.  New programs must be strong enough to overcome old programs. Discussion Question  Think About It! What is the good news with Rule 8?

21 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Rules of Self-Talk continued 9.The strength of the program is influenced by the number of times the same or similar information is presented.  Repetitive self-talk is repetitive self-direction!  Repeat... Repeat...Repeat!

22 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Rules of Self-Talk continued 10.The strength of the program is influenced by the perceived importance of the source.  If you believe in the source, its messages will be more influential. 11.The subconscious mind will, at all times, attempt to act on its dominant operative program.  The strongest programs you have on file in your program banks will dominate.

23 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. What we accomplish is indelibly linked to what we say to ourselves. 1. Our behavior, self-esteem, and even our level of stress are influenced by our self-talk. 2. Most things we do are first created by self-talk. 3. Self-talk shapes the results we get. 4. We can allow it to wander aimlessly, or we can harness it for motivation.  Use your power of self-talk to direct and visualize a desirable future and images of success.

24 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. How to Reprogram Negativity 1.It’s a mistake to start telling ourselves not to put ourselves down.  We don’t stop thinking about something by trying not to think about it. 2.When we use self-talk consciously, we put ourselves back in control of the most important part of our programming.

25 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. 3.Program Your Brain with Empowering, Self- Confidence Building Thoughts (Self-Talk)  Replace negative thoughts with positive thoughts or directives. Replacement Self-Talk I’m stupid  I’m smart I blew it  I learned from it I can’t do math  I will beat math I can’t write  I will work to become a good writer

26 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. How to Reprogram Negativity continued 4.Write/post/repeat your new self-talk. 5.Flood your brain with positives  repeat and accentuate the positive. 6.Begin using new self-talk to fix one problem at a time.

27 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. How to Reprogram Negativity continued 7. Override the years of negative messages with repetitive positive ones. 8.Reprogramming does not simply mean deciding to make a change.  It requires creating specifically worded phrases of self-direction—self-talk.

28 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Controlling Negative Self-Talk 1. Negative self-talk is overwhelmingly used to develop and nourish negative attitudes. 2. The difficulty in becoming aware of your self-talk is due to the speed and invisibility of your thoughts (self-talk).  Thoughts may be lightening quick and barely on the edge of awareness.

29 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Controlling Negative Self-Talk continued 3.Because self-talk has an automatic quality, it is easy to foster the illusion that feelings arise from spontaneous events. 4.Once we can slow down our feelings, the thinking/self-talk underlying them can be challenged and/or replaced.  New rational self-talk can replace old irrational self-talk.  New rational thinking can generate rational behavior.

30 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. -Small Group Discussion Questions- Think about it! 1. How can understanding your self-talk help you help yourself? 2. List as many examples of your own negative self-talk as possible. 3. Select the two most nagging negative messages and write new positive messages to override the negative messages. 4. List as many examples of your own positive self-talk as possible.

31 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. “As a man thinketh in his heart, so he is.”  The above verse from Proverbs influenced James Allen to write As a Man Thinketh. Quotes from James Allen’s literary work:  “A man is literally what he thinks, his character being the complete sum of all his thoughts.”  “Every action is preceded by a thought.”  “The right thinking begins with what we say to ourselves.”  “If anything is excellent or praiseworthy, think about these things.”  What do you think?

32 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Self-Discipline “Rule your mind or it will rule you.” —Horace “The first and best victory is to conquer self.” —Plato “Talent without discipline is like an octopus on roller skates. There's plenty of movement, but you never know if it’s going to be forward, backwards, or sideways.” —H. Jackson Brown, Jr.  Discuss how the above quotes relate to self-discipline.

33 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. ? ? ? Have you ever found yourself procrastinating on the things that were actually very important to you?

34 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Discipline is Freedom 1.Some people think of discipline in a negative connotation such as boring, doing without, or a lack of freedom. In fact, the opposite is true. 2.As Stephen R. Covey once wrote, “the undisciplined are slaves to moods, appetites and passions.” 3.And the undisciplined lack the freedom that comes with possessing particular skills and abilities, e.g., to play a musical instrument, speak a foreign language, be a computer programmer, athlete, or a college graduate.

35 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Discipline is Freedom continued 4.Self-discipline involves acting according to what you think instead of how you feel in the moment. 5.It often involves sacrificing the pleasure and thrill of the moment for what matters most in life. 6.Therefore, it is self-discipline that drives you to:  Work diligently on homework.  Go to the gym when the couch and TV seem more appealing.  Wake early to work on yourself.  Say “no” when tempted to break your diet. 7.In the long run, self-discipline gives you more freedom to choose.  Give an example of how self-discipline is freedom.

36 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Goal-Setting and Planning is Self-Discipline in Action “You have a gold mine, when you have a goal mind.” (Anonymous) What you get by achieving your goals is not as important as what you become by achieving your goals. (Zig Ziglar)  Discuss

37 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Goal Setting Provides Us a Guide for Action For the next few minutes, each of us will establish a goal and the steps to achieve it.

38 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Today you will:  Set a goal  something you can do every day or every other day.  Select a partner/classmate who will check on your progress each day when you arrive to class  for the next 6 weeks.  Use the tools and strategies from the text.

39 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. 1. Goal Setting Ideas  Work on a paper or project  Begin fitness program  Eat a healthful diet  Drink adequate water  Drink less soda  Quit smoking  Lose weight  Make time for______________________  Learn a new sport/hobby  Get more/less sleep  Study  Read  Commit kindness  Use more humor

40 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Just think about it…. Just think about it…. 1. What goal do you want to achieve?  Share your goal with your classmate/partner.   Next we will try to make it more specific with a plan to achieve it!

41 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. 2. Develop a Specific Plan of Action a. Be informed—learn about effective methods to use to achieve your goal  Losing weight ?  learn about weight loss methods  Improving reading comprehension?  learn about reading strategies b.Set a specific goal to give yourself target  I will walk a minimum of 45 minutes a day  I will drink two 8-ounce glasses of water 15 minutes before each meal

42 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. 2. Develop a Specific Plan of Action continued c. Set a specific goal to give yourself target  What, when, where, how long  If appropriate make it measurable  Consider building in flex time Examples  I will walk a minimum of 45 minutes a day  I will drink two 8-ounce glasses of water 15 minutes before each meal  I will go to the gym at 6 am, or 5 pm depending on which time works best.

43 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. 2. Develop a Specific Plan of Action continued 1. Develop smaller steps to achieve your goal  Smaller steps help you succeed step by step 2. Recruit others to support you  Only those who will encourage you 3. Consider rewarding yourself with a  movie or outfit, but no outrageous desserts if you’re trying to lose weight

44 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Write Your Specific Plan Short term: Long term: Where:When: How Long: Support:Reward:

45 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. When you develop specific plans, you are preparing to take action.

46 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Sample Plan What: Walk for weight loss Short term: walk 30 mins.—5 days/wk Long term: walk 60 mins.—6 days/wk Where: In my neighborhood When: 7 a.m., 4 p.m., or 9 p.m. How Long: Start at 30 mins. Add 5 mins./wk Support: Jane Walkwithme Reward: ____________________

47 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. 3.Get a Commitment  Hear you partner say, “I will ____.” Pay attention to body language to check sincerity. Pay attention to body language to check sincerity.  Ask “What if” questions to: examine and prepare for possible obstacles. examine and prepare for possible obstacles. to check commitment. to check commitment.

48 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Examples  “What if ________, will you still do it?”  “What would keep you from doing it?”  “If something interrupts your plan, how will you reschedule it?”

49 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. More on commitment...  Make a written commitment.  Go public.  Chart your progress  increases continuation and progress.

50 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. 4. Check on your partner’s progress on a regular basis.  Ask how her plan is progressing.  Help her consider modifications to the plan as appropriate. Note  Some plans fail because they are inappropriate.  Use WHAT questions to encourage evaluation of plan and progress.

51 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Examples  “Is what you are doing working out?”  “What would make your plan work better?”  “What times are better for you?”  What questions also help us rethink.

52 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. 5. Help your partner if she doesn’t follow her plan.  Always forgive!  Don’t ask “Why” she failed. Asking “WHY” is asking for excuses!  “Instead ask what would make your plan work better?”

53 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. 6. Create new and positive self-talk. a.Become aware of self-talk messages that:  keep you from achieving your goals. (“I’m too tired.”)  precede a bad habit. (“One more piece.”) b.Ask yourself: “What might I tell myself that will keep me from reaching my goal?” c. Begin to question negative self-talk and replace it with positive self-talk that helps you achieve your goals.

54 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Examples of self-talk replacement  OLD:“I don’t have time to walk!”  NEW:“I’ll find time to walk!”  OLD: “I have to have my morning caffeine!”  NEW:“After a while I won’t miss my caffeine!”  OLD: “I hate drinking water!”  NEW:“I am going to learn to love water!”

55 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. More on Self-Talk  Tell yourself what your new self will be like.  Simple awareness of your self-talk helps you gain a measure of control.  When we mislead ourselves we impede ourselves.

56 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. 7. Don’t give up on your partner Instead help her   Obtain another commitment to her plan.  Find ways to modify the old plan.  Develop a new plan.

57 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. -Small Group Discussion- Think about it! To change or not to change behavior! How can such a simple concept of self-talk be so powerful in directing our actions?

58 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Be sure to use your goal setting strategies to achieve both education and recreation. Re-create!

59 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Self-image  It’s Mental  Inspire yourself with positive self-talk.  Recognize your own successes.  Avoid negative self-talk that stunts your self-esteem.  Create clear and positive visions of who you are and where you want to go.  Be your own best inspiration!

60 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Partner Up with a Nearby Classmate and Discuss  Many possible ways to create a successful self-image.  How can you start to be your own best inspiration today?

61 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Inspirational and Supportive Relationships with Others 1.Share your college and career goals and aspirations with family, friends, faculty, and your advisor.  When they know your goals they’ll know more about how to support and encourage you. 2.Choose friends that are inspired, encouraging, and self-disciplined.  Friends like this will help you meet your goals and balance work and play. 3.Identify a role model—someone who has been successful in obtaining a career for which you are preparing. 4.Again—be your own best inspiration!

62 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. On your own...  Create/write a clear and positive vision of who you are and where you want to go.  Share this vision with a neighboring classmate.

63 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Key Chapter Points 1.You have a variety of tools and resources at your disposal to keep you motivated to succeed in College. 2.Visualization is a powerful source of motivation especially when you put detail into it. 3.Goal accomplishment comes to those who lay out specific goals, step-by-step, and modify as appropriate. 4.Get balanced—plan time for fun, too. 5.Create clear and positive visions of who you are and where you want to go.

64 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Key Chapter Points continued 6.Share your college and career goals and aspirations with family, friends, faculty, and your advisor. 7.Yes, having good role models is still helpful. 8.Positively crafted self-talk creates directives for what you want to do and be. 9.Self-discipline often involves sacrificing the pleasure and thrill of the moment for what matters most in life. 10.Be your own best inspiration.

65 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. My College sweatshirt inspires me!

66 Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd. Got a circle of support friends and family?


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