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® PARTNERING FOR COLLECTIVE IMPACT Presented by Karen Pittman CEO, The Forum for Youth Investment 2012 Second Decade Summit Meeting March 30, 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "® PARTNERING FOR COLLECTIVE IMPACT Presented by Karen Pittman CEO, The Forum for Youth Investment 2012 Second Decade Summit Meeting March 30, 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 ® PARTNERING FOR COLLECTIVE IMPACT Presented by Karen Pittman CEO, The Forum for Youth Investment 2012 Second Decade Summit Meeting March 30, 2012

2 THE BIG QUESTIONS Are all young people in your community ready for college, work and life? Are your neighborhoods offering enough high quality supports year-round? Do leaders in your community work collectively and effectively towards big goals for children and youth? If not, Ready by 21 Can Help

3 “Organizations have attempted to solve social problems by collaboration for decades without producing many results. The vast majority of these efforts lack the elements of success that enable collective impact initiatives to achieve a sustained alignment of efforts… “Our research shows that successful collective impact initiatives typically have five conditions that together produce true alignment and lead to powerful results: 3 Collective impact (Kania and Kramer) a common agenda shared measurement systems mutually reinforcing activities continuous communication backbone support organizations

4 A common agenda that speaks to improving academic, health and social outcomes of children from birth to young adulthood Shared measurement systems that track both a children’s progress and link it to performance improvements of the systems/settings where children spend time Mutually reinforcing activities among providers on the front lines and coalitions and decision makers Continuous Communication within and across all levels of the infrastructure and out to the public Backbone supports organized in a way that ensures the success of the whole, even when supporting functions are spread across several entities 4 Common Purpose

5 The Need: Well-Prepared Youth “The continued ability of states to compete in the global economy hinges on how well they enable their younger citizens to attain the competencies and social attributes necessary to ultimately fuel economic growth and contribute to the well-being of their families and communities.” — National Governors Association’s Center for Best Practices October 2003

6 43% are doing well in two life areas and okay in one Productivity: Attend college, work steadily Health: Good health, positive health habits, healthy relationships Connectedness: Volunteer, politically active, active in religious institutions, active in community Too Few Young People are Ready Doing Well 43% Doing Poorly 22% In the Middle 35% 22% are doing poorly in two life areas and not well in any Productivity: High school diploma or less, are unemployed, on welfare Health: Poor health, bad health habits, unsupportive relationships Connectedness: Commit illegal activity once a month Researchers Gambone, Connell & Klem (2002) estimate that only 4 in 10 are doing well in their early 20s.

7 We Know What it Takes to Support Development The National Research Council reports that teens need: Physical and Psychological Safety Appropriate Structure Supportive Relationships Opportunities to Belong Positive Social Norms Support for Efficacy and Mattering Opportunities for Skill-Building Integration of Family, School and Community efforts

8 Do these Supports Really Make a Difference? Even in Adolescence? ABSOLUTELY SOURCE : Finding Out What Matters for Youth: Testing Key Links in a Community Action Framework for Youth Development Gambone and colleagues show that youth with supportive relationships as they enter high school are 5 times more likely to leave high school “ready” than those with weak relationships…

9 … and those seniors who were “ready” at the end of high school were more than 4 times as likely to be doing well as young adults. Do these Supports Make a Difference in Adulthood? SOURCE: Finding Out What Matters for Youth: Testing Key Links in a Community Action Framework for Youth Development

10 from 4 in 10 doing well to 7 in 10 doing well Providing These Supports CAN Change the Odds Gambone/Connell’s research suggests that if all young people got the supports they needed in early adolescence, the picture could change…

11 11 Fragmented Services Medi-Cal – EPSDT Healthy Families Parent Expansion Child Health & Disability Program Expanded Access Primary Care Trauma Case Funding Co-payments for ER Services Child Lead Poisoning Prevention Program HIV/AIDS Prevention & Education Breast Cancer Screening Food Stamps WIC TANF GAIN, CAL Learn, Cal WORKS, etc. School-Based MH Services for Medi-Cal Kids Probation Officers in Schools Cardenas-Schiff Legislation Health Care Through Probation Mental Health Evaluations Juvenile Halls Child Care – CCDBG, SSBG, Cal WORKS Child Care, etc. After-School Programs – 21 st Century Learning Centers, etc. Promoting Safe & Stable Families Child Abuse & Neglect Programs Foster Care – Transition, Independent Living, Housing, etc. Adoption Assistance, Adoption Opportunities Public Schools ESEA, Title I School Lunch & Breakfast Head Start IDEA After-School Programs Textbook Funding Tests & Achievement Teacher Issues GED Mom Dad 9 year old 5 year old Mom’s sister Boyfriend in trouble Baby 1 1/2 Source: Dunkle, M. (2002) Understanding LA Systems that Affect Families. Los Angeles, CA: George Washington University and the LA County Children’s Planning Council EducationHealth & FoodSocial ServicesChild & Family Services Mental Health & Probation 11

12 COLLABORATION S United Neighborhood Centers Of Greater Roch. Rochester‘s Child Youth 2000 Juvenile Justice Council CCSI TIER II Interagency Council Comm. Asset Network Board of Health Children & Family Serv. Subcomm. School Health Leadership Team RECAP Community Profile Preventive Services Coalition RAEYC Early Childhood Develop I. Homeless Continuum of care Impl. Team Monroe Cty. Sch & Comm. Health Ed. Network Rochester Effectiveness Partnership N.E.T. City Violence Initiative Task Force on Violence Domestic Violence Consortium Perinatal Community Consortium Do Right by Kids campaign Perinatal Substance Abuse Coalition SACSI Counselor’s Consortium Rochester Children’s Collab. Roch. Enterprise Community Zone P. YRBS Group HW & Tutoring Round Table Student Assistance Prof. Adult Services Subcomm. Student Asst. Prof. Greater Roch. Area Transitions Collab. America’s Promise CHANGE Continuous Improvement Service Delivery Advocacy Evaluation Positive Outcomes for Youth & Families 12 Best Practice Community Mobilization CASAS Providers Cross - Systems Change MCTP NBN Not Me Not Now SDFSCA Planning Committees Reclaiming Youth PCIC OASAS Prevention Initiative Community Service Board Reg. 2 Preventive Provid.N Mentoring Round Table Runaway & Homeless Youth Ser Provider Domestic Violence Partnership Health Action Homeless Services Network Youth Services Quality C. Diversion Collaborative

13 Why Does Fragmentation Happen? Leaders in communities don’t set out to create a fragmented mess of supports and services. So why is that what we always end up with? When we focus exclusively on single issue, or a single age group, a single kind of support, or a single program we end up with a tangled mess of supports and services instead of a community. And with only 40% of our young people ready, instead of 100%.

14 Early Literacy Campaign Safe Streets Coalition Neighborhood Councils Youth Network Workforce Investment Board P-20 Council College Access Network Substance Abuse Coalition Mayor’s Office on Children, Youth, Families Afterschool Alliance Health and Wellness Coalition Early Childhood Coalition Interfaith Collaborative Gang Violence Task Force Early Literacy Campaign Safe Streets Coalition Neighborhood Councils Youth Network Workforce Investment Board P-20 Council College Access Network Substance Abuse Coalition Mayor’s Office on Children, Youth,Families Early Childhood Coalition Afterschool Alliance Health and Wellness Coalition Teen Pregnancy Prevention Council Gang Violence Task Force Expand early childhood education Improve teacher quality Increase after-school participation Improve OST program quality Expand learning opportunities Reform juvenile justice programs Increase mentoring Increase child health coverage Reduce child welfare caseloads Expand early childhood education Create jobs and internships Expand life skills education Improve teacher quality Increase after-school participation Improve OST program quality Expand learning opportunities Reform juvenile justice programs Increase mentoring Increase child health coverage Reduce child welfare caseloads Expand life skills education Create jobs and internships Increase Healthy Births Increase School Readiness Increase School Readyness Reduce Youth Violence Improve Third Grade Reading Reduce Abuse & Neglect Reduce Obesity Reduce Bullying Increase On-Time Graduation Improve Job Skills Increase Civic Engagement Reduce Substance Use Decrease Youth Idleness Increase College Completion Increase Healthy Births Reduce Risky Behavior Reduce Teen Pregnancies Reduce Youth Violence Improve Third Grade Reading Reduce Abuse & Neglect Reduce Obesity Reduce Bullying Increase On-Time Graduation Improve Job Skills Increase Civic Engagement Reduce Substance Use Decrease Youth Idlenesss Increase College Completion Child and Youth Outcomes Leadership Groups Family, School & Community Supports FRAGMENTED LEADERSHIP

15 Core Supports & Opportunities Delinquency & Violence Pregnancy & HIV/AIDS Dropouts & Illiteracy Unemployment & Under-employment Substance Abuse, Suicide, Depression Fragmented Goals Civic Engagement Educational Attainment Physical Health Vocational Readiness & Success Social & Emotional Health

16 Community Goals and Measures Goal 1: All children born healthy  Decrease rate of infants who die before their 1st birthday by 10%  Decrease rate of infants born weighing 5.5 lbs. or less by 5% Goal 2: Children enter school with skills necessary for success  5% of children enter kindergarten w/skills necessary to be successful  85% of children 0-5 yrs. enrolled in Imagination Library  At least 85% of children screened annually will exhibit age appropriate skills.  85% of children are read to 5 or more times/week.  Increase participation in home visitation/parent education sessions by 30%  75% of early childhood programs have high quality language & literacy environment Goal 3: Children & youth achieve academic success  Increase % of students attending school 95% of the time  Increase % of students reading on grade level by 3rd grade to 75%  Increase % of students transitioning to 6th grade w/their cohort group to 90%  90% of students avoid risky behaviors  By % of students will graduate from high school on time. Goal 4: Children & youth have access to high-quality learning environments & community resources during out-of-school time  75% of OST programs participate in the YPQA Program & achieve quality standards  Increase % of children & youth in Rb21 high quality afterschool programs  Increase % of youth with 31 or more developmental assets in Rb21 after school programs Goal 5: Youth are work ready  Increase % of students entering college  Increase % of student retention in post-secondary education

17 Changing the Way we do Business Single coalitions are learning to define and document their contribution by: Doing a problem analysis Developing a logic model Deciding on specific interventions Documenting implementation Analyzing contribution 17

18 Example: Metro City Safe Streets Partners Mayor’s Office Juvenile/Family Courts Police Department Interfaith Coalition Metro United Way Metro Schools Metro PTA Neighborhood Councils Tenants Association Realtors Association Chamber of Commerce YouthNet Works Seniors Together Neighborhood Level Indicators # thefts per 100 housing units # arrests per 1000 residents # arrests per 1000 youth <24 # gang related incidents per month 18 Interventions Adequate lighting Reclaimed vacant lots Landlord Controls Liquor zoning restrictions Community policing Active Tip lines Neighborhood Patrols Afterschool/Teen Clubs Youth Jobs Program Community Rec. Centers Senior Escort Service School Safety Zones Mentoring Drug Courts

19 19 Metro City Safe Streets Contribution to Reduced Crime: Neighborhood A Thefts per 100 Housing Units Cumulative Community Changes

20 Contributions Consistent Across Neighborhoods Safe Streets Neighborhood A Safe Streets Neighborhood B 20

21 Contributions Consistent Across Neighborhoods Safe Streets Neighborhood A No Intervention Neighborhood G 21

22 What did success lead to? Community Confidence Boosted? Yes. By setting clear goals and documenting its contribution in selected neighborhoods, Metro Safe Streets Coalition was able to garner support for adding additional neighborhoods. Community Evaluation Model Introduced? Yes. Other Coalitions signed up to use this planning and evaluation approach. Community Leaders Aligned? No. There was no incentive or opportunity to look for overlap in partners, indicators, and strategies. 22

23 Example: Partner Comparison Metro City Safe Streets Mayor’s Office Juvenile/Family Courts Police Department Interfaith Coalition Metro United Way Metro Schools Metro PTA Neighborhood Councils Tenants Association Realtors Association Chamber of Commerce YouthNetWorks Seniors Together 23 Metro Teen Pregnancy Coalition Mayor’s Office Juvenile/Family Courts Public Health Department Interfaith Coalition Metro United Way Metro Schools Metro PTA Neighborhood Councils University Hospital & Pediatricians Child Care Association Chamber of Commerce YouthNetWorks Planned Parenthood

24 Example: Intervention Comparison 24 Metro Teen Pregnancy Coalition Sexuality Education (home, school, faith) School Based Clinics Neighborhood Clinics School week curfews Peer to Peer Counseling 211 and Teen Hot Lines College and Career Awareness Afterschool/Teen Clubs Youth Jobs Program Community Rec. Centers Service Learning/Youth Engagement School Safety Zones Mentoring Family counseling Metro City Safe Streets Adequate lighting Reclaimed vacant lots Landlord Controls Liquor zoning restrictions Community policing Active Tip lines Neighborhood Patrols Afterschool/Teen Clubs Youth Jobs Program Community Rec. Centers Senior Escort Service School Safety Zones Mentoring Drug Courts

25 Ready by 21 Theory of Change Moving the Small gear makes a big difference… But we have to connect the dots to move the gear.

26 Ready by 21 Takes the Ingredients for Collective Impact and Then Provides Standards, Solutions, and Success Standards = Think Differently Solutions = Act Differently Success Tracking = Act Together Critical Components for Achieving Collective Impact: A common agenda Shared measurement systems Mutually reinforcing activities Continuous communication Backbone support organizations

27 Ready Youth: Thinking Beyond Academics The Readiness Target Birth to Young Adulthood Developmentally On Track Productive Connected Healthy & Safe

28 Ready Communities. Looking Beyond School to Maximize Supports Coordinated Accessible Well-Attended High Quality

29 Pipeline Resource Mapping Example 9 th -12 th Grade  Teen Pregnancy Prevention  CIS-Performance Learning Centers  Adolescent Health Clinics-School Based  Juvenile Justice-Diversion  4H  100 Black Men  Latin American Association  Year-Up Atlanta  CCRPI Waiver  Career Pathways  21 st Century (strong interest in implementation for H.S.)  Federal Workforce Development Joint Enrollment/Dual Credit  GOCF-Teen Date Violence Awareness  Career Academics  Work Ready  UWMA /Youth on the Move

30 Ready Leaders: Building the infrastructure for collective impact Partnerships Goals Data Actions Individual Orgs & Systems Issue/Neighborhood Coalitions Age Group Partnerships Overarching Leadership Council

31 Ready by 21 Leadership Capacity Standards Broader Partnerships  Build an overarching leadership council  Align and strengthen coalitions, commissions and intermediaries  Engage key stakeholders in setting priorities and solving problems Bigger Goals  Establish a balanced set of goals and indicators for all children, youth and young adults  Define supports that the full community must provide  Create a big picture, goal-oriented action plan  Define common terms and communicate core messages Better Data  Collect complete data about youth outcomes, community supports and leadership actions  Align and connect data for decision making  Use the best information about what works Bolder Actions  Improve systems and settings  Align policies and resources  Increase demand  Engage youth, families and community members in solutions

32 Leadership Capacity Gaps Bolder Actions

33 RB21 Collaborative Network Structure Children enter school ready to learn, avoid risky behaviors and graduate prepared for careers School Readiness Middle School Transition High School Graduation UWMA Staff Support Funding Cluster Ready by 21 Leadership Council College / Advanced Training Juvenile Justice System Avoidance Teen Pregnancy / HIV Prevention Alcohol, Tobacco, & Other Drug Use Childhood Obesity/Health and Wellness Early Grade Literacy

34 12 Objectives for Community Level Success Broad Partnerships Big Goals Better Data Bold Actions Coordinated Accessible Well-Attended High Quality Developmentally On Track Productive Connected Healthy & Safe

35 Readyby21.org Forumfyi.org Success. Solutions. Standards.


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