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Standards! Explain the importance of key issues and events that led to the Civil War; include slavery, states rights, nullification, Missouri Compromise,

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Presentation on theme: "Standards! Explain the importance of key issues and events that led to the Civil War; include slavery, states rights, nullification, Missouri Compromise,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Standards! Explain the importance of key issues and events that led to the Civil War; include slavery, states rights, nullification, Missouri Compromise, Compromise of 1850 and the Georgia Platform, Kansas-Nebraska Act, Dred Scott case, election of 1860, the debate over secession in Georgia, and the role of Alexander Stephens. State the importance of key events of the Civil War; include Antietam, the Emancipation Proclamation, Gettysburg, Chickamauga, the Union blockade of Georgias coast, Shermans Atlanta Campaign, Shermans March to the Sea, and Andersonville.

2 Categorize or put on a map whether these are a Southern or Northern Term – if a battle, where was it fought and which side won! Abraham Lincoln Jefferson Davis AntietamNorthern ConfederacyConfederationCSAConfederate States of America ChickamaugaGeneral Braggs Blockade Runners USA USNationalStates RightsSectionalism United StatesUnited States of America NorthGeneral Sherman GettysburgBlockadeAlexander Stephens General Meade General McClellan General LeeSlaveryNo slavery AbolitionistsSecessionSecedeAnaconda

3 Somebody WantedButSo General Lee for the South To show the Souths strength and moved to battle on Northern soil. He wanted to show his strength to the North as well as keep France and England out of the war since they were against slavery. He was outnumbered and even though the battle was considered a draw, when his troops retreated to Virginia, the North claimed it as a win. Abraham Lincoln chose this time to release the Emancipation Proclamation to also keep France and England out of the war. Battle of Antietam

4 Who: General Robert E. Lee, McClellan in the North - Abraham Lincoln What: Bloodiest one day battle of the Civil War When: September 17, 1862 Where: Northern soil - Maryland Why: General Lee wanted to bring the war North after winning battles on Southern soil and he wanted to bring Maryland (a slave state) into the CSA and wanted to show England and France that the South was strong How did this battle end?: Even though the battle was considered a draw, once Lee returned to Virginia, Abraham Lincoln saw this as a victory for the North and released the Emancipation Proclamation and keep Britain and France out of the war (they already had abolished slavery)

5 The Emancipation Proclamation Who: Abraham Lincoln What: document that set a deadline for states to join the union again (surrender) as of January 1, 1863 OR all slaves in Rebellion would be freed (notice that slaves that were in the border states that had not seceded would still be slaves) Technically, if the South had surrendered by that date, they would have been able to keep their slaves. When: September 22, 1862 – After the Battle of Antietam Where: Northern States Why: to try to avoid war and kept the European powers out of the conflict How did this impact the country: The South pretty much ignored the proclamation and the war continued and escalated.

6 The Battle of Gettysburg The battle that many historians believe was the true turning point of the Civil War was the Battle of Gettysburg. The battle was fought near the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania from July 1-3, Over 50,000 soldiers were killed on that day. Similarly to the Battle of Antietam, the South had won a series of victories and Lee wanted to again bring the war to the North. This time Lee hoped that a victorious campaign in the North would cause the North to give up and realize that they could not keep the South in the Union. During the battle, Lees outnumbered army failed to gain the high ground and the advantage. After three days of heavy losses, the Southern army retreated back to Virginia. Due to the loss of a large portion of Lees men, the South never invaded the North again. Combined with U.S. victories in the Western theater that were occurring at the same time, the South was demoralized. After this battle, the North began to put constant pressure on the South and was eventually able to invade and capture the rebellious states. The Battle of Gettysburg The battle that many historians believe was the true turning point of the Civil War was the Battle of Gettysburg. The battle was fought near the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania from July 1-3, Over 50,000 soldiers were killed on that day. Similarly to the Battle of Antietam, the South had won a series of victories and Lee wanted to again bring the war to the North. This time Lee hoped that a victorious campaign in the North would cause the North to give up and realize that they could not keep the South in the Union. During the battle, Lees outnumbered army failed to gain the high ground and the advantage. After three days of heavy losses, the Southern army retreated back to Virginia. Due to the loss of a large portion of Lees men, the South never invaded the North again. Combined with U.S. victories in the Western theater that were occurring at the same time, the South was demoralized. After this battle, the North began to put constant pressure on the South and was eventually able to invade and capture the rebellious states..

7 The Battle of Gettysburg Who: General Lee for the Confederacy and General Mead for the Union What: Battle fought in Northern soil in which 50,000 soldiers were killed When: July 1-3, 1863 Where: Gettysburg, PA Why: Lee wanted to have another battle on Northern Soil (much like The Battle of Antietam) to show his strength. He thought this battle would convince the North that they could not keep the South in the Union. How did this battle impact the Civil War: The South was demoralized (discouraged) from the loss and due to losing so many men, never fought on Northern soil again. This was a turning point of the war. The North put constant pressure on the South and was able to invade and capture the rebellious states one at a time.

8 President Lincolns Gettysburg Address Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate -- we can not consecrate -- we can not hallow -- this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us -- that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion -- that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain -- that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom -- and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

9 The Battle of Chickamauga For the first three years of the Civil War, Georgia was virtually left untouched. There were a few skirmishes, though the Battle of Fort Pulaski in 1862 led to the Norths control of the Georgia coast and expansion of the Union Blockade of Southern ports. However, the major impact of war arrived on Georgias doorstep in 1863, during the Battle of Chickamauga. The town of Chickamauga is located in Walker County just 10 miles south of the Tennessee/Georgia line. The battle lasted three days from September and was the second bloodiest battle of the Civil War with over 34,000 casualties. The battle was the largest ever fought in the state of Georgia. The Generals that led this battle were William S. Rosecrans of the U.S. and Braxton Bragg of the CSA. This battle was part of a larger Northern objective to capture the city of Chattanooga, itself an important rail center, and to use its capture as a stepping stone to capture a more important rail road hub: Atlanta. While Rosecrans captured Chattanooga earlier that September, he wanted to circle around Braggs army and cut the Southern supply lines in Western Tennessee and Northwest Georgia. However, the CSA discovered Rosecrans army in the area and attacked. This battle is significant for two reasons. First it was the largest Union defeat in the Western theater of the Civil War. Second, due to the Souths victory, General Bragg focused on recapturing Chattanooga. The attack on Chattanooga was a southern defeat that brought General Ulysses S. Grant more attention and led to his promotion to the Commanding General of the U.S. Army. Once Chattanooga was defended and securely in Union hands, it was used as a launching point for Shermans Atlanta Campaign. The Battle of Chickamauga For the first three years of the Civil War, Georgia was virtually left untouched. There were a few skirmishes, though the Battle of Fort Pulaski in 1862 led to the Norths control of the Georgia coast and expansion of the Union Blockade of Southern ports. However, the major impact of war arrived on Georgias doorstep in 1863, during the Battle of Chickamauga. The town of Chickamauga is located in Walker County just 10 miles south of the Tennessee/Georgia line. The battle lasted three days from September and was the second bloodiest battle of the Civil War with over 34,000 casualties. The battle was the largest ever fought in the state of Georgia. The Generals that led this battle were William S. Rosecrans of the U.S. and Braxton Bragg of the CSA. This battle was part of a larger Northern objective to capture the city of Chattanooga, itself an important rail center, and to use its capture as a stepping stone to capture a more important rail road hub: Atlanta. While Rosecrans captured Chattanooga earlier that September, he wanted to circle around Braggs army and cut the Southern supply lines in Western Tennessee and Northwest Georgia. However, the CSA discovered Rosecrans army in the area and attacked. This battle is significant for two reasons. First it was the largest Union defeat in the Western theater of the Civil War. Second, due to the Souths victory, General Bragg focused on recapturing Chattanooga. The attack on Chattanooga was a southern defeat that brought General Ulysses S. Grant more attention and led to his promotion to the Commanding General of the U.S. Army. Once Chattanooga was defended and securely in Union hands, it was used as a launching point for Shermans Atlanta Campaign.

10 The Battle of Chickamauga Who: William S. Rosecrans of the Union and Braxton Bragg of the Confederacy What: second bloodiest battle of the Civil War (34,000 casualties), largest fought in GA When: September 18-20, 1863 Where: town of Chickamauga – Walker County which is 10 miles south of the Tennessee/Georgia line (GA had no major battles for the first 3 years of the war) Why: the North wanted to capture Chattanooga which was a rail center and then onto Atlanta to capture the major rail road hub – this would stop the Southern supply lines in Western Tennessee and northwest GA so it started in the Chickamauga and was supposed to move on to these important areas How did this battle impact the Civil War: largest Union defeat since the Southern leader and the Confederacy then went onto try and recapture Chattanooga – BUT this led to General Ulysses S. Grant becoming Commanding General of the U.S. Army and it brought Chattanooga back to Union and was the starting point for Shermans Atlanta Campaign.


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