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Venn Mayelle A. Teposo Researcher Mr. Jerico D. Catipay

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1 Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus)seeds as a Potential Source of Biodiesel
Venn Mayelle A. Teposo Researcher Mr. Jerico D. Catipay Research Adviser Chapter I Problem and its Setting INTRODUCTION The Philippines embraced the development of biodiesel a few years ago with hopes of achieving future energy security, augmenting farmer’s income, and generating rural employment. Biodiesel production in the Philippines is currently unlimited to just biofuels. The global production and use of biodiesel has increased dramatically in the past few years, primarily due to increasing gas prices, national security concerns, environment considerations, and the efforts to revitalize rural communities. To extend the scientific ability, this research proposal is working on how the Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds as a source of biodiesel worked. Soxhlet extraction was originally designed for the extraction of a lipid from a solid material. However, a Soxhlet extractor is not limited to the extraction of lipids. Typically, a Soxhlet extraction is only required where the desired compound has a limited solubility in a solvent, and the impurity is insoluble in that solvent. If the desired compound has a significant solubility in a solvent then a simple filtration can be used to separate the compound from from the insoluble substance. In this study, soxhlet extraction is conduct where Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds is tested if it has the ability to produce biodiesel. Statement of the Problem The primary purpose of this study is to ascertain the effect of Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds as a potential source of biodiesel. Specifically, it will attempt to answer the following questions: Are Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds oil extracted is feasible in biodiesel? Are Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds has a high percentage composition of oil? Objectives of the Study This study aimed to do the following: To determine if the oil extracted from Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds is feasible in biodiesel. To determine the percentage composition of oil in Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds. Hypotheses Based on the research problem, the researcher formulated the following hypotheses: The oil extracted from Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds is not feasible in biodiesel. A Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seed does not have high percentage composition of oil. Significance of the Study This study is expected to augment the knowledge of the people on how the Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds work as a potential source of biodiesel. Results of this study could serve as essential guide and tool for economic services of the government officials and other sectors that would implement primary projects and outstretch programs in the country. The researcher believe that sufficient knowledge and information about the potential source of biodiesel using the Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds will help convince people to use this plant rather than expensive biodiesels considering our economic status today. It is hoped that this study will benefit students and educators who wish to broaden their knowledge about using the Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds as a potential source of biodiesel. This study is believed to yield information and will facilitate government programs in extending and advocating assistance and educational awareness and improve the quality of life of the people within the area. Scope and Delimitation of the Study This study utilized Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds as a potential source of biodiesel. Only fifty kilograms of Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds will be used in this study.Soxhlet Extraction to the Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds Conceptual Framework Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds extract Review of Related Literature Soxhlet Extraction A Soxhlet extractor is a piece of laboratory apparatus invented in 1879 by Franz von Soxhlet. It was originally designed for the extraction of a lipid from a solid material. However, a Soxhlet extractor is not limited to the extraction of lipids. Typically, a Soxhlet extraction is only required where the desired compound has a limited solubility in a solvent, and the impurity is insoluble in that solvent. If the desired compound has a significant solubility in a solvent then a simple filtration can be used to separate the compound from the insoluble substance. Fruit extraction in progress. The sample is placed in the thimble. Normally a solid material containing some of the desired compound is placed inside a thimble made from thick filter paper, which is loaded into the main chamber of the Soxhlet extractor. The Soxhlet extractor is placed onto a flask containing the extraction solvent. The Soxhlet is then equipped with a condenser. The solvent is heated to reflux. The solvent vapour travels up a distillation arm, and floods into the chamber housing the thimble of solid. The condenser ensures that any solvent vapour cools, and drips back down into the chamber housing the solid material. The chamber containing the solid material slowly fills with warm solvent. Some of the desired compound will then dissolve in the warm solvent. When the Soxhlet chamber is almost full, the chamber is automatically emptied by a siphon side arm, with the solvent running back down to the distillation flask. This cycle may be allowed to repeat many times, over hours or days. During each cycle, a portion of the non-volatile compound dissolves in the solvent. After many cycles the desired compound is concentrated in the distillation flask. The advantage of this system is that instead of many portions of warm solvent being passed through the sample, just one batch of solvent is recycled. After extraction the solvent is removed, typically by means of a rotary evaporator, yielding the extracted compound. The non-soluble portion of the extracted solid remains in the thimble, and is usually discarded Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) Marang (Artocarpus odoratissimus) is not only as exotic as it sounds but also as it looks and tastes. This tropical fruit tree that wouldn’t thrive in regions where temperature falls below 32° above zero looks like jackfruit and seeded breadfruit, but it is superior in quality to either of these. It’s indigenous in the Philippines, particularly in Mindanao where it is popularly grown especially from July to September. Marang tree is medium-sized to large. It grows to about 25 meters with a trunk diameter of 40 cm. It could grow in a wide range of soil types-from light to heavy soils-but it will grow better in deep, loamy soil with a pH ranging from It also yields best in places that are elevated at 800 m above sea level. It is propagated by budding, grafting, and marching. The seedlings are allowed to harden for at least two months when these are at least 1 foot tall with three pairs of leaves each. The ideal distance between seedlings in an open field is 6 m x 6 m in a square system. It can be intercropped while it is still unproductive. It starts to bear fruits at 4 to 5 years of age. Its fruit is 16 cm long, 13 cm in diameter, and weighs about 1,000 to 1,800 grams. The thick, fleshy rind is thickly studded with greenish, yellowish, blunt spines. Inside it is a white, soft, sweet, and aromatic flesh from which many whites seeds easily separate. The fruit is also highly perishable that’s why it is carefully harvested by cutting its peduncle and then placing it in woven baskets or boxes. Marang is a popular fruit dessert in Mindanao. After all, it is nutritious; it contains protein, fat, carbohydrates, crude fiber, ash, calcium, phosphorus, iron, retinol, beta-carotene, vitamin A, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, and ascorbic acid. The fruit has also a strong scent especially when it is ripe. Once opened, it should be consumed immediately or in just a few hours as it easily loses flavor and oxidizes. The seeds are also edible; these are boiled or roasted and can be processed into flour. These are just some of the reason why marang has market potential. Its short shelf life, however, limits its uses but studies on postharvest and processing of marang are already undertaken to extend its shelf life. Review of Related Studies This study is a modified investigatory project that is based from the study entitled "Tuba-tuba" plant: Alternative source of energy. From being referred to as a poisonous plant for its seeds, the "tuba-tuba" is now massively cultivated in the province of Bohol for its potential to become a future source of biodiesel. Philippine Coconut regional manager Deodiro Ravelo said they started yesterday the inter-cropping of the "tuba-tuba" plant into the 50-hectare coconut plantation in Ubay, Bohol. "Tuba-tuba" plant is a shrub that belongs to the Jatropha curcas family, a common ornamental plant which grows practically everywhere. This project was initiated by the newly installed PCA administrator and former Iloilo congressman Oscar Garin, who is also the presidential assistant on agriculture for biofuel, Ravelo said. He added that the technology to be employed in coming up with biofuel from the sap of the "tuba-tuba" plant is the same technology that had greatly improved the lives of poverty-stricken citizens of India. The technology will be fully implemented as soon as the PCA team will return from their visit to India. For now, mass propagation of the "tuba-tuba" plant is being encouraged and inter-cropping is done in order to save on space. But precautionary measures are to be taken in securing the area as the "tuba-tuba" fruit is already proven to be poisonous and to have afflicted children who had eaten its fruits Already, coconut has been proven as convertible to biodiesel, the answer to the expensive diesel supply from abroad. Researcher: Venn Mayelle A. Teposo ______________________________________________ Research Adviser: Mr. Jerico D. Catipay

2 Statement of the Problem
The primary purpose of this study is to ascertain the effect of Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds as a potential source of biodiesel. Specifically, it will attempt to answer the following questions: 1.)Are Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds oil extracted is feasible in biodiesel? 2.)Are Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds has a high percentage composition of oil?

3 Objectives of the Study
This study aimed to do the following: 1.)To determine if the oil extracted from Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds is feasible in biodiesel. 2.)To determine the percentage composition of oil in Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds.

4 Hypotheses Based on the research problem, the researcher formulated the following hypotheses: 1.)The oil extracted from Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds is not feasible in biodiesel. 2.) A Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seed does not have high percentage composition of oil.

5 Significance of the Study
This study is expected to augment the knowledge of the people on how the Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds work as a potential source of biodiesel. Results of this study could serve as essential guide and tool for economic services of the government officials and other sectors that would implement primary projects and outstretch programs in the country. The researcher believe that sufficient knowledge and information about the potential source of biodiesel using the Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds will help convince people to use this plant rather than expensive biodiesels considering our economic status today. It is hoped that this study will benefit students and educators who wish to broaden their knowledge about using the Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds as a potential source of biodiesel. This study is believed to yield information and will facilitate government programs in extending and advocating assistance and educational awareness and improve the quality of life of the people within the area.

6 Scope and Delimitation of the Study
This study utilized Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds as a potential source of biodiesel. Only fifty kilograms of Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds will be used in this study.

7 Methodology Collection of Marang (Artocarpus odoratisimus) seeds
Preparation of Samples Oil and Hexane Separation Oil Extraction Oil Testing Results

8 An Effective Biodiesel Analysis of the Results


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