Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Chapter 12 National Income Accounting and the Balance of Payments Prepared by Iordanis Petsas To Accompany International Economics: Theory and Policy.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Chapter 12 National Income Accounting and the Balance of Payments Prepared by Iordanis Petsas To Accompany International Economics: Theory and Policy."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Chapter 12 National Income Accounting and the Balance of Payments Prepared by Iordanis Petsas To Accompany International Economics: Theory and Policy International Economics: Theory and Policy, Sixth Edition by Paul R. Krugman and Maurice Obstfeld

3 Slide 12-2Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter Organization  Introduction  The National Income Accounts  National Income Accounting for an Open Economy  The Balance of Payment Accounts  Summary

4 Slide 12-3Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. Introduction  Microeconomics It studies the effective use of scarce resources from the perspective of individual firms and consumers.  Macroeconomics It studies how economies’ overall levels of employment, production, and growth are determined. It emphasizes four aspects of economic life: –Unemployment –Saving –Trade imbalances –Money and the price level

5 Slide 12-4Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc.  The national income accounts and the balance of payments accounts are essential tools for studying the macroeconomics of open, interdependent economies.  National income accounting Records all the expenditures that contribute to a country’s income and output  Balance of payments accounting Helps us keep track of both changes in a country’s indebtedness to foreigners and the fortunes of its export- and import-competing industries Introduction

6 Slide 12-5Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. The National Income Accounts  Gross national product (GNP) The value of all final goods and services produced by a country’s factors of production and sold on the market in a given time period It is the basic measure of a country’s output.

7 Slide 12-6Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc.  GNP is calculated by adding up the market value of all expenditures on final output: Consumption –The amount consumed by private domestic residents Investment –The amount put aside by private firms to build new plant and equipment for future production Government purchases –The amount used by the government Current account balance –The amount of net exports of goods and services to foreigners The National Income Accounts

8 Slide 12-7Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. The National Income Accounts Figure 12-1: U.S. GNP and Its Components, 2000

9 Slide 12-8Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc.  National Product and National Income National Income –It is earned over a period by its factors of production. –It must equal the GNP a country generates over some period of time. –One person’s spending is another’s income (i.e., total spending must equal total income). The National Income Accounts

10 Slide 12-9Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc.  Capital Depreciation, International Transfers, and Indirect Business Taxes Adjustments to the definition of GNP: –Depreciation of capital –It reduces the income of capital owners. –It must be subtracted from GNP (to get the net national product). –Net unilateral transfers of income –They are part of a country’s income but are not part of its product. –They must be added to the net national product. –Indirect business taxes –They are sales taxes. –They must be subtracted from GNP. The National Income Accounts

11 Slide 12-10Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc.  Gross Domestic Product (GDP) It measures the volume of production within a country’s borders. It equals GNP minus net receipts of factor income from the rest of the world. It does not correct for the portion of countries’ production carried out using services provided by foreign-owned capital. The National Income Accounts

12 Slide 12-11Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. National Income Accounting for an Open Economy  Consumption The portion of GNP purchased by the private sector to fulfill current wants  Investment The part of output used by private firms to produce future output  Government Purchases Any goods and services purchased by federal, state, or local governments

13 Slide 12-12Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc.  The National Income Identity for an Open Economy It is the sum of domestic and foreign expenditure on the goods and services produced by domestic factors of production: Y = C + I + G + EX – IM (12-1) where: –Y is GNP –C is consumption –I is investment –G is government purchases –EX is exports –IM is imports In a closed economy, EX = IM = 0. National Income Accounting for an Open Economy

14 Slide 12-13Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc.  An Imaginary Open Economy Assumptions of the model: –There is an economy, Agraria, that can only produce wheat. –Each citizen of Agraria is both a consumer and a farmer of wheat. –The Agrarian government appropriates part of the crop to feed its army. –Agraria can import milk from the rest of the world in exchange for exports of wheat. –The price of milk is 0.5 bushel of wheat per gallon, and at this price Agrarians want to consume 40 gallons of milk. National Income Accounting for an Open Economy

15 Slide 12-14Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. Table 12-1: National Income Accounts for Agraria, an Open Economy (bushels of wheat) National Income Accounting for an Open Economy

16 Slide 12-15Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc.  The Current Account and Foreign Indebtedness Current account (CA) balance –The difference between exports of goods and services and imports of goods and services (CA = EX – IM) –A country has a CA surplus when its CA > 0. –A country has a CA deficit when its CA < 0. –CA measures the size and direction of international borrowing. –A country’s current account balance equals the change in its net foreign wealth. National Income Accounting for an Open Economy

17 Slide 12-16Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. CA balance is equal to the difference between national income and domestic residents’ spending: Y – (C+ I + G) = CA –CA balance is goods production less domestic demand. –CA balance is the excess supply of domestic financing. –Example: Agraria imports 20 bushels of wheat and exports only 10 bushels of wheat (Table 12-1). The current account deficit of 10 bushels is the value of Agraria’s borrowing from foreigners, which the country will have to repay in the future. National Income Accounting for an Open Economy

18 Slide 12-17Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. Figure 12-2: The U.S. Current Account and Net Foreign Wealth Position, National Income Accounting for an Open Economy

19 Slide 12-18Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc.  Saving and the Current Account National saving (S) –The portion of output, Y, that is not devoted to household consumption, C, or government purchases, G. –It always equals investment in a closed economy. –A closed economy can save only by building up its capital stock (S = I). –An open economy can save either by building up its capital stock or by acquiring foreign wealth (S = I + CA). –A country’s CA surplus is referred to as its net foreign investment. National Income Accounting for an Open Economy

20 Slide 12-19Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc.  Private and Government Saving Private saving (S p ) –The part of disposable income that is saved rather than consumed S p = I + CA – S g = I + CA – (T – G) = I + CA + (G – T) (12-2) –T is the government's “income” (its net tax revenue) –S g is government savings (T-G) Government budget deficit (G – T) –It measures the extent to which the government is borrowing to finance its expenditures. National Income Accounting for an Open Economy

21 Slide 12-20Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. The Balance of Payments Accounts  A country’s balance of payments accounts keep track of both its payments to and its receipts from foreigners.  Every international transaction automatically enters the balance of payments twice: once as a credit (+) and once as a debit (-).

22 Slide 12-21Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc.  Three types of international transactions are recorded in the balance of payments: Exports or imports of goods or services Purchases or sales of financial assets Transfers of wealth between countries –They are recorded in the capital account. The Balance of Payments Accounts

23 Slide 12-22Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc.  Examples of Paired Transactions A U.S. citizen buys a $1000 typewriter from an Italian company, and the Italian company deposits the $1000 in its account at Citibank in New York. –That is, the U.S. trades assets for goods. –This transaction creates the following two offsetting entries in the U.S. balance of payments: –It enters the U.S. CA with a negative sign (-$1000). –It shows up as a $1000 credit in the U.S. financial account. The Balance of Payments Accounts

24 Slide 12-23Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. A U.S. citizen pays $200 for dinner at a French restaurant in France by charging his Visa credit card. –That is, the U.S. trades assets for services. –This transaction creates the following two offsetting entries in the U.S. balance of payments: –It enters the U.S. CA with a negative sign (-$200). –It shows up as a $200 credit in the U.S. financial account. The Balance of Payments Accounts

25 Slide 12-24Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. A U.S. citizen buys a $95 newly issued share of stock in the United Kingdom oil giant British Petroleum (BP) by using a check drawn on his stockbroker money market account. BP deposits the $95 in its own U.S. bank account at Second Bank of Chicago. –That is, the U.S. trades assets for assets. –This transaction creates the following two offsetting entries in the U.S. balance of payments: –It enters the U.S. financial account with a negative sign (-$95). –It shows up as a $95 credit in the U.S. financial account. The Balance of Payments Accounts

26 Slide 12-25Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. A U.S. bank forgives $5000 in debt owed to it by the government of Bygonia. –This transaction creates the following two offsetting entries in the U.S. balance of payments: –It enters the U.S. capital account with a negative sign (-$5000). –It shows up as a $5000 credit in the U.S. financial account. The Balance of Payments Accounts

27 Slide 12-26Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc.  The Fundamental Balance of Payments Identity Any international transaction automatically gives rise to two offsetting entries in the balance of payments resulting in a fundamental identity: Current account + financial account + capital account = 0 (12-3) The Balance of Payments Accounts

28 Slide 12-27Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. The Balance of Payments Accounts Table 12-2: U.S. Balance of Payments Accounts for 2000 (billions of dollars)

29 Slide 12-28Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. The Balance of Payments Accounts Table 12-2: Continued

30 Slide 12-29Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc.  The Current Account, Once Again The balance of payments accounts divide exports and imports into three categories: –Merchandise trade –Exports or imports of goods –Services –Payments for legal assistance, tourists’ expenditures, and shipping fees –Income –International interest and dividend payments and the earnings of domestically owned firms operating abroad The Balance of Payments Accounts

31 Slide 12-30Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc.  The Capital Account It records asset transfers and tends to be small for the United States.  The Financial Account It measures the difference between sales of assets to foreigners and purchases of assets located abroad. –Financial inflow (capital inflow) –A loan from the foreigners with a promise that they will be repaid –Financial outflow (capital outflow) –A transaction involving the purchase of an asset from foreigners The Balance of Payments Accounts

32 Slide 12-31Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc.  The Statistical Discrepancy Data associated with a given transaction may come from different sources that differ in coverage, accuracy, and timing. –This makes the balance of payments accounts seldom balance in practice. –Account keepers force the two sides to balance by adding to the accounts a statistical discrepancy. –It is very difficult to allocate this discrepancy among the current, capital, and financial accounts. The Balance of Payments Accounts

33 Slide 12-32Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc.  Official Reserve Transactions Central bank –The institution responsible for managing the supply of money Official international reserves –Foreign assets held by central banks as a cushion against national economic misfortune Official foreign exchange intervention –Central banks often buy or sell international reserves in private asset markets to affect macroeconomic conditions in their economies. The Balance of Payments Accounts

34 Slide 12-33Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. Official settlements balance (balance of payments) –The book-keeping offset to the balance of official reserve transactions –It is the sum of the current account balance, the capital account balance, the nonreserve portion of the financial account balance, and the statistical discrepancy. –Example: The U.S. balance of payments in 2000 was -$35.6 billion, that is, the balance of official reserve transactions with its sign reversed. –A country with a negative balance of payments may signal that it is running down its international reserve assets or incurring debts to foreign monetary authorities. The Balance of Payments Accounts

35 Slide 12-34Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. The Balance of Payments Accounts Table 12-3: Calculating the U.S. Official Settlements Balance for 2000 (billions of dollars)

36 Slide 12-35Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. The Balance of Payments Accounts Table 12-3: Continued

37 Slide 12-36Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc.  Case Study: Is the United States the World’s Biggest Debtor? At the end of 1999, the United States had a negative net foreign wealth position far greater than that of any other single country. The United States is the world’s biggest debtor. However, the United States has the world’s largest GNP. The Balance of Payments Accounts

38 Slide 12-37Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. The Balance of Payments Accounts Table 12-4: International Investment Position of the United States at Year End, 1998 and 1999 (millions of dollars)

39 Slide 12-38Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. The Balance of Payments Accounts Table 12-4: Continued

40 Slide 12-39Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. Summary  A country’s GNP is equal to the income received by its factors of production. GDP is equal to GNP less net receipts of factor income from abroad, measures the output produced within a country’s territorial borders.  In a closed economy, GNP must be consumed, invested, or purchased by the government. In an open economy, GNP equals the sum of consumption, investment, government purchases, and net exports of goods and services.

41 Slide 12-40Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. Summary  All transactions between a country and the rest of the world are recorded in its balance of payments accounts.  The current account equals the country’s net lending to foreigners. National saving equals domestic investment plus the current account. Transactions involving goods and services appear in the current account of the balance of payments, while international sales or purchases of assets appear in the financial account.

42 Slide 12-41Copyright © 2003 Pearson Education, Inc. Summary  The capital account records asset transfers and tends to be small in the United States.  Any current account deficit must be matched by an equal surplus in the other two accounts of the balance of payments, and any current account surplus by a deficit somewhere else.  International asset transactions carried out by central banks are included in the financial account.


Download ppt "Chapter 12 National Income Accounting and the Balance of Payments Prepared by Iordanis Petsas To Accompany International Economics: Theory and Policy."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google