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The creative counselor: fusing the arts, career development, and core content Virginia Career VIEW Fall 2014 Workshop.

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Presentation on theme: "The creative counselor: fusing the arts, career development, and core content Virginia Career VIEW Fall 2014 Workshop."— Presentation transcript:

1 the creative counselor: fusing the arts, career development, and core content Virginia Career VIEW Fall 2014 Workshop

2 Discussion Is there any integration/collaboration in your school involving the arts, core subjects and/or career development…. In any capacity? Why do you believe or not believe it is important to integrate core subjects, the arts, and career development? – Pros – Cons What is your level of confidence in attempting to integrate the arts, core subjects, and career development? – 1 not at all confident – 2 somewhat confident – 3 very confident

3 Brief: current state of our education system “We are prisoners of the pictures and experiences of education that we had,” says Tony Wagner, expert-in-residence at Harvard’s educational innovation center and author of The Global Achievement Gap. “We want schools for our kids that mirror our own experience, or what we thought we wanted. That severely limits our ability to think creatively of a different kind of education. But there’s no way that tweaking that assembly line will meet the 21 st -century world. We need a major overhaul.” “One reason we haven’t made much progress academically over the past 50 years is because it hasn’t been economically crucial for American kids to master sophisticated problem-solving and critical-thinking skills in order to survive. But that’s not true anymore. There’s a lag for cultures to catch up with the economic realities, and right now we’re living in that lag, “says [Amanda] Ripley [author of The Smartest Kids in the World: And How They Got That Way]. So our kids aren’t growing up with the kind of skills or grit to make it in the global economy.” Choi, A. (9 September 2014). What the best education systems are doing right. Questions Worth Asking: What Makes a Good Education? Retrieved from Ideas.ted.com. Accessed on 8 September, 2014.

4 How can this benefit students? What the research says… “The expressive arts — visual arts, movement, drama, music and writing — offer countless ways to promote the academic, career and personal/social development of students, which are goals of a comprehensive school counseling program.” “…according to research conducted by Michael Mason and Susan Chuang in 2001, students participating in an after-school arts program showed increases in self- esteem, social skills and leadership.” “In another study conducted by Katherine Smithrim and Rena Upitis in 2005, student participation in a Canadian schoolwide arts education program correlated with engagement in school welcome strategies that facilitate student engagement in school and learning.” Van Velsor, P. (February 1, 2013). Thinking creatively: Expressive arts for counseling youth in the schools. Counseling Today.

5 Counselor perceptions: What the research says…. “When the idea of including more expressive arts activities is suggested to school counselors, however, they often cite lack of time, training and talent as obstacles.” “Additionally, school counselors need not be accomplished expressive artists themselves to introduce creativity into their counseling programs. In her book Art Therapy for Groups, Marian Liebmann suggests that practitioners experiment with different media and get to know what it is like to work with those media.” Van Velsor, P. (February 1, 2013). Thinking creatively: Expressive arts for counseling youth in the schools. Counseling Today

6 What the research suggests… “If possible, try out an expressive art activity on your colleagues at a district counselor meeting or a professional development workshop. This can provide you some idea of possible difficulties, help you smooth out potential logistical problems and demonstrate the benefits of the activity.” Van Velsor, P. (February 1, 2013). Thinking creatively: Expressive arts for counseling youth in the schools. Counseling Today

7 career development the ARTS core content

8 Accessed from 9 September 2014 Want to learn more? Read this:

9 Accessed from 9 September 2014 Want to learn more? Read this:

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11 Artist: Pablo Picasso Work: Guernica (1937) Reference: It was created in response to the bombing of Guernica, a Basque Country village in northern Spain, by German and Italian warplanes at the behest of the Spanish Nationalist forces on 26 April 1937 during the Spanish Civil War (www.wikipedia.com).www.wikipedia.com Careers: painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, stage designer Subjects: math, history

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13 Artist: Salvador Dalí Work: The Persistence of Memory (1931) Reference: “It epitomizes Dalí's theory of "softness" and "hardness", which was central to his thinking at the time. As Dawn Ades wrote, "The soft watches are an unconscious symbol of the relativity of space and time, a Surrealist meditation on the collapse of our notions of a fixed cosmic order".[3] This interpretation suggests that Dalí was incorporating an understanding of the world introduced by Albert Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity (www.wikipedia.com).”www.wikipedia.com Careers: sculptor, photographer, filmmaker, painter, mixed-media artist Subjects: general science, physics

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15 Artist: Daniel Chester French Work: seated figure of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln (1920) Reference: “It is situated in the Lincoln Memorial (constructed 1914– 22), on the National Mall, Washington, D.C., USA, and was unveiled in Stylistically, the work follows in the Beaux Arts and American Renaissance traditions (www.wikipedia.com).”www.wikipedia.com Careers: sculptor Fun Facts: extensive training in anatomy and drawing, studied at MIT, designed the Pulitzer Prize gold medal, neighbor and friend of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Louisa May Alcott Subjects: history, government, economics

16 Definition of Visual Arts Visual Arts include the traditional fine arts such as drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, and sculpture; media arts include film, graphic communications, animation, and emerging technologies; architectural, environmental and industrial arts such as urban, interior, product, and landscape design; folk arts; and works of art such as ceramics, fibers, jewelry, works in wood, paper, and other materials. (Accessed from National Visual Arts Standards Poster; State Education Agency Directors of Arts Education (SEADAE) on behalf of NCCAS )

17 Arts Processes Creating: conceiving and developing new ideas Presenting: Interpreting and sharing [artistic] work Responding: Understanding and evaluating how [the arts] convey meaning Connecting: Relating [artistic] ideas and work with personal meaning and external content CREATINGPRESENTINGRESPONDINGCONNECTING Accessed from National Visual Arts Standards Poster; State Education Agency Directors of Arts Education (SEADAE) on behalf of NCCAS. 2013

18 Core Content Life and Career Skills Arts Processes 4 C’s

19 Group Activities CREATE PRESENT RESPOND CONNECT THINK CRITICALLY COMMUNICATE COLLABORATE USE CREATIVITY

20 Reflection  Impressions  Challenges  Resources  Outcome

21 career development the ARTS core content

22 Emily Fielder


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