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Todays Agenda and Objective A: 1/23 B: 1/24 Finalizing OMAM Projects Review Unit IV Schedule (annotated bibliography due dates and The Great Gatsby reading.

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Presentation on theme: "Todays Agenda and Objective A: 1/23 B: 1/24 Finalizing OMAM Projects Review Unit IV Schedule (annotated bibliography due dates and The Great Gatsby reading."— Presentation transcript:

1 Todays Agenda and Objective A: 1/23 B: 1/24 Finalizing OMAM Projects Review Unit IV Schedule (annotated bibliography due dates and The Great Gatsby reading schedule) Vocabulary: Greek Prefixes in Context Grammar Review: Transition Words Introduction to Modernism and Fitzgeralds The Great Gatsby By the end of class today, we will make predictions related to motifs and an authors rhetorical purpose in the narrative mode. Please turn your documentary analysis into the tray!

2 OMAM Projects What is the difference between a thesis statement for a rhetorical analysis and a thesis statement for an argument? Authors last name rhetorical strategies + universal purpose = rhetorical analysis thesis statement Qualifier (optional), authors argument + defend/challenge examples from the text as support = argument thesis statement

3 DATE IN CLASS...HOMEWORK... Lesson 1: Jan. 17/18 Scheduling with the Counseling Office, Mock Exam debriefing, Of Mice and Men project presentations, begin documentary response Lesson 2: Jan. 19/20 Of Mice and Men project presentations, conclude documentary response Lesson 3: Jan. 23/24 Vocabulary, grammar, introduction to Modernism and Fitzgeralds The Great Gatsby (return to rhetorical analysis) Begin reading Fitzgeralds The Great Gatsby (Chapters 1 and 2) Lesson 4: Jan. 25/26 Scheduling with the Counseling Office, Vocabulary, grammar, introduction to the expository mode and expository rhetorical strategies, review of rhetorical strategies for all modes Continue reading Fitzgeralds The Great Gatsby (Chapters 3 and 4) Lesson 5: Jan. 27/30 Vocabulary, grammar, expository mode: practice analyzing the organizational pattern: definition Continue reading Fitzgeralds The Great Gatsby (Chapters 5 and 6) Lesson 6: Jan. 31/Feb. 1 Vocabulary, grammar, expository mode: practice analyzing the organizational pattern: compare and contrast Continue reading Fitzgeralds The Great Gatsby (Chapters 7 and 8) Lesson 7: Feb. 2/3 Vocabulary, grammar, expository mode: practice analyzing the organizational pattern: causation, Annotated Bibliography due Finish reading Fitzgeralds The Great Gatsby (Chapter 9) Lesson 8: Feb. 6/7 Unit IV (Part I) Examrhetorical analysis: multiple- choice and essay Lesson 9: Feb. 8/9 Introduction to the Harlem Renaissance and review of rhetorical analysis

4 Vocabulary: Greek Prefixes Read the following excerpt to determine what the underlined word means: Mark Twain, in his 1903 treatise What is Men? criticizes Wallaces anthropocentric view by writing: If the Eiffel Tower were now representing the world's age, the skin of paint on the pinnacle-knob at its summit would represent mans share of that age; and anybody would perceive that that skin was what the tower was built for. I reckon they would. I dunno.

5 Vocabulary: Greek Prefixes Anthropo – man Example: anthropomorphic What does this word mean, especially if you know that the root word morph means to take shape? What other words can you think of that begin with this prefix? Does this prefix make a word positive or negative?

6 Grammar Review: Transitions What words can you use to begin the first body paragraph? What words can you use to introduce a refutation paragraph? What words can you use to transition to other body paragraphs? What words can you use to begin the conclusion paragraph?

7 Historical Context Notes: Modernism

8 Introduction to Modernism Revolutionary, or reactionary, movement Began in the 1890s but exploded after World War I The war traumatized and devastated much of the world, both physically and psychologically Many people in the West felt disillusioned Ended after World War II

9 Ideas of Modernism Modernist authors sought to break away from traditions and conventions through experimentation with new literary forms, devices, and styles Authors incorporated the new psychoanalytic theories of Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung into their works Authors paid particular attention to languageboth how people use it and how authors believed people could or should use it

10 Characteristics of Psychoanalytic Theory Focus on characters mental process and personality Concerned with the nature of the unconscious mind subconscious powers motivate men and women The mind has three parts: Idsubconscious, passionate, irrational, unknown, pleasure- seeking to the point of insatiability Superegointernalized social beliefs, balances pressures, makes moral judgments, sacrificial sometimes to a fault Egoconscious, rational, logical, and orderly; mediates the Id and Superego

11 Ideas of Modernism, cont. Modernist authors reflect: Pervasive sense of loss Disillusionment Despair Detachment in a fragmented world To a Modernist, art is: a potentially integrating, restorative force and a remedy for the uncertainty of the modern world

12 Techniques of Modernism Although Modernists depict disorder in their works, they try to create order by establishing patterns through Allusions (especially to mythology) Symbols Motifs Narrative Structure Point of view

13 Review of Modernism Ideas Loss of self Disillusionment Fragmentation Events World War I Roaring Twenties The Great Depression World War II Authors F. Scott Fitzgerald T. S. Eliot

14 F. Scott Fitzgerald Worked as a journalistmade money selling stories to periodicals Fought in World War I Troubled alcoholic but only wrote while sober Painstakingly revised all his work Enjoyed celebrity life here and abroad with his wife Zelda (often institutionalized)

15 Introduction to The Great Gatsby Fitzgerald helped characterize the Roaring 1920s, which he dubbed the Jazz Age Published The Great Gatsby in 1925 Novel narrated by Nick Carraway During the 1920s: Economy soared following World War I 1919 – 18 th Amendment passed Prohibition (ban on the sale and consumption of alcohol) Bootleggers became millionaires, the Mob gained power Underground culture grewsprawling private parties managed to elude police and speakeasies thrived Opulence and hedonism dominated the period Ideas of femininity began to change with flappers

16 Introduction to The Great Gatsby

17 The Great Gatsby Assignment As you read the novel, focus on the following motifs as reoccurring ideas throughout the narrative: 1) Social Class (or Classism) 2) Masculinity vs. Femininity 3) Morality vs. Corruption 4) Nature in Conflict with Society 5) The Passage of Time 6) Appearance vs. Reality 7) Violence vs. Tranquility 8) The American Dream

18 Homework: Begin reading Fitzgeralds The Great Gatsby. Complete Chapters 1 and 2 for next class. As you read, watch for Fitzgerald to introduce the motifs. For each motif, make a prediction about what universal message Fitzgerald will convey by the end of the book. In other words, what narrative purpose will Fitzgerald achieve in relationship to this idea? For example, if we considered the motif of judgment: Fitzgerald argues that Americans judge others primarily based on how much wealth a person can acquire. List a quote, cited parenthetically, to support your prediction for each motif. For example: Daisy says, I simply cannot stand a person who doesnt care about having nice things (Fitzgerald 22).


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