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Click logo to begin. POWERED-AIR PURIFYING RESPIRATOR (PAPR) Refresher Training.

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Presentation on theme: "Click logo to begin. POWERED-AIR PURIFYING RESPIRATOR (PAPR) Refresher Training."— Presentation transcript:

1 Click logo to begin. POWERED-AIR PURIFYING RESPIRATOR (PAPR) Refresher Training

2 Learning Objectives next previous Slide 2 of 22 At the end of the training, you will be able to:

3 What is a PAPR? next previous Slide 3 of 22 A Powered-Air Purifying Respirator (PAPR) is a high efficiency powered air blower/filtration unit that consists of motor-driven fan and battery pack. The fan draws contaminated air through the high efficiency filter before it enters the breathing tube in the rear of the headgear.

4 Capabilities of a PAPR next previous Slide 4 of 22 Inertial Impaction - particles having too much inertia due to size or mass cannot follow the airstream as it is diverted around a filter fiber. This mechanism is responsible for collecting larger particles. Interception - As particles pass close to a filter fiber, they may be intercepted by the fiber. Again, this mechanism is responsible for collecting larger particles. Diffusion - Small particles are constantly bombarded by air molecules, which causes them to deviate from the airstream and come into contact with a filter fiber. This mechanism is responsible for collecting smaller particles. Electrostatic Attraction - Oppositely charged particles are attracted to a charged fiber. This collection mechanism does not favor a certain particle size. from NIOSH - Guidance for Protecting Building Environments from Airborne Chemical, Biological, or Radiological Attacks

5 Capabilities of a PAPR next previous Slide 5 of 22 from NIOSH - Guidance for Protecting Building Environments from Airborne Chemical, Biological, or Radiological Attacks Respiratory Protection against certain airborne particulate contaminants, including dusts, fumes, mists, and radionuclides. Impaction and interception are the dominant collection mechanisms for particles greater than 0.2 µm, and diffusion is dominant for particles less than 0.2 µm.

6 Capabilities of a PAPR next previous Slide 6 of 22 from OSHA – Assigned Protection Factors for the Revised Respiratory Protection Standard The assigned protection factors (APF) for a loose-fitting face piece and a hood is 25. This means that the respirator offers protection against the contaminate at 25 times its Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL). The hooded PAPR can have an APF of 1000 if the respirator manufacturer can provide evidence that testing of the PAPR with the hood demonstrates performance at a level of protection of 1,000 or greater.

7 Limitations of a PAPR next previous Slide 7 of 22 Do NOT use if: – Atmospheres contain less than 19.5% oxygen – Atmospheres presents an immediate dangerous to life or health condition – Airflow of PAPR is less than 6 cfm – Concentration of contaminants are unknown – Toxic gases or vapors are present – Any parts of PAPR are damaged

8 Why do you need a PAPR? next previous Slide 8 of 22 To Protect Yourself from Potential Exposure to Respiratory Pathogens and Particulates Tuberculosis (TB) Select Agents  Avian Influenza  Francisella tularensis  Yersinia Pestis Aerosolization of Pathogens  Flow Cytometry  Sonication Animal Dander/Shedding Picture from Belgian Biosafety Server Pipetting generates aerosols.

9 When do you need a PAPR? next previous Slide 9 of 22 Entering any BSL3 or ABSL3 facilities Entering ABSL2 facilities if a N95 respirator is not sufficient Working in the Cell Sorting Facility with live BSL2 agents upon Biosafety Officer’s requirements Any tuberculosis research that involves or has the potential for aerosol formation Any task utilizing select agents

10 Who says you need a PAPR? next previous Slide 10 of 22 The use of feasible engineering controls is the primary means to control air contaminants. Respirators are required when “effective engineering controls are not feasible, or while they are being instituted.” In some cases, where the hazard cannot be completely eliminated, and thus requires the use of a respirator. Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) says…

11 OSHA Respiratory Protection Standard next previous Slide 11 of CFR Requires: Written Program and SOPs – Describes procedures for routine use – Describes procedures for emergency situations Medical Evaluation Annual Training Annual Fit Testing – Not required for PAPR Use

12 How do you use a PAPR? next previous Slide 12 of 22 PAPR must always be inspected prior to donning and entering contaminated area. Check hood for tears, rips, blistering, and discoloration of the material. For loose- fitting face pieces also check elasticity around the edges. Check for creases and cracks in the face shield. Check the hose for tears, pinholes, and blistering of material. Check the green LED light on the battery. If the light is on when the battery is not plugged into the respirator, the battery is receiving power from the outlet. If the light is on when the battery is plugged into the respirator, the respirator should be fully charged (6 cfm for 8 hours). Check the belt for damage. Use the airflow indicator to ensure ample air and charge. Should be above top line. Check motor unit for cracks and damage.

13 Putting on a PAPR next previous Slide 13 of 22 Click the picture above to view the video

14 Taking off your PAPR next previous Slide 14 of 22 Click the picture above to view the video

15 What if my PAPR stops working? next previous Slide 15 of 22 1.Close all cultures, and leave everything in the biological safety cabinet. 2.Exit the lab as usual. 3.Notify your supervisor, facility manager, or respirator coordinator. 4.Get new personal protective equipment and respirator.

16 How do I maintain my PAPR? next previous Slide 16 of 22 Decontaminate the PAPR with a non- alcoholic, non-abrasive cleaner. Inspect the hood, hose, and PAPR unit for any damage. Hoods and hoses must be replaced 6 months after their initial use. Batteries are replaced every two years. Filters and gaskets must be replaced annually. – They must be changed inside a certified biosafety cabinet inside containment, and under the watch of the respirator coordinator, facility manager or Biosafety Officer. gasket PAPR Unit Interior

17 How do I maintain my PAPR? next previous Slide 17 of 22 The PAPR or PAPR parts should be replaced if the following conditions are present: – If required by infection control procedures. – If required by research protocols and/or procedures. – If there is noticeable damage to the respirator. – If the filter media of the respirator becomes wet or moist. – If the respirator has become contaminated with blood or body fluids, and cannot adequately be decontaminated.

18 How do I dispose of old PAPR parts? next previous Slide 18 of 22 All old, replaced, nonoperational, or damaged PAPRs or PAPR parts must be decontaminated prior to disposal. – All PAPR parts (i.e. hoods, hoses, and filters) must be autoclaved prior to disposal. – After decontamination, items must be disposed of as medical waste.

19 How do I store my PAPR? next previous Slide 19 of 22 Return the PAPR to the charging station – Batteries can be left on trickle charge for 30 consecutive days. Longer periods of time may cause batteries to lose their capacity to hold a charge. Complete the respirator log book – when changing the filters and gaskets. Respirator use must be recorded on sign in logs for daily use Store the hood and hose in a clean, dry area away from heat and direct sunlight – Ensure hood and hose are completely dry before storage

20 User Responsibilities next previous Slide 20 of 22 Respirator should be inspected before and after each use. Inform your facility manager of any defects or improper PAPR function. The headpiece of the PAPR should be replaced every 6 months or when the hood begins to breakdown, which ever comes first. The respirator HEPA filter and gasket must be replaced every 12 months. PAPR batteries must be recharged after each use. After every use of the PAPR, the user must clean off the hood, breathing tube, and battery pack with disinfectant. Depending on your facility’s Respiratory Protection Plan, the facility manager or each user is responsible for maintaining a record for each PAPR which lists and documents maintenance and use history.

21 Respiratory Protection Coordinators next previous Slide 21 of 22 Medical Science Building (MSB) - A900 International Center for Public Health (ICPH) & Regional Bio-containment Laboratories (RBL) Users who do not have a respirator coordinator are responsible for the maintenance of their own respirators. CONTACTLOCATION Marilyn EkonomidisBSL3 Manager CONTACTLOCATION Steve Park (A)BSL3 Manager and RBL 2 nd Floor BSL3 Supervisor Juanita VakerichABSL3 Supervisor Blas Perez-PeixotoICPH 2 nd Floor BSL3 Supervisor Bill HonnenICPH 3 rd Floor BSL3 Supervisor

22 EOHSS Contacts previous Slide 22 of 22 If you have any questions or need assistance, please contact us. Tamara McNair, Biosafety Officer Jessica McCormick, Sr. Biosafety Officer Marta Figueroa, Director EOHSS Main Office (973) Click here to advance to the quiz


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