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Southern Regional Education Board 1 Creating a Broader Definition of Rigor Connections Conference Pheasant Run Resort St. Charles, Illinois March 9, 2010.

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Presentation on theme: "Southern Regional Education Board 1 Creating a Broader Definition of Rigor Connections Conference Pheasant Run Resort St. Charles, Illinois March 9, 2010."— Presentation transcript:

1 Southern Regional Education Board 1 Creating a Broader Definition of Rigor Connections Conference Pheasant Run Resort St. Charles, Illinois March 9, 2010 Lois J. Barnes Welcome!

2 Southern Regional Education Board Housekeeping Phone calls Restrooms Breaks Punctuality Sharing “Rule of Two Feet”

3 Southern Regional Education Board Icebreaker: Flip Chart Strategy  Literacy  Note-taking  Organization  Relationship Building

4 Southern Regional Education Board Flip Chart Directions  Take 5 sheets of paper, one of each color.  Stagger the sheets one inch apart.  Fold in half.  Crease the fold well.  Open the fold back up and cut at the crease.  After you cut, you’ll have two flip charts.  Put two staples in the top of each flip chart.  Make your flip chart….

5 Southern Regional Education Board Flip Chart Contents  YOUR NAME  CHOOSE for three tabs: Family Education Work experience Hobbies/interests Clubs/organizations My Hero Favorites (vacations, music, books, etc.) What I want to be when I grow up Something funny about yourself An interesting experience from your job Other (your choice) CHOOSE for one tab: A way rigor is evident in a practice at your school

6 Southern Regional Education Board Flip Chart Strategy: Pair- Share-Compare  Talk about ways to use flip charts in the classroom

7 Southern Regional Education Board Jigsaw: A Broader Definition of Rigor Designate each person as # 1,2,3, or 5. Move into expert groups. See page 4 for discussion focus questions. Back in your “home” groups, write a clear and measurable definition of rigor. How will you package your definition so that it is meaningful and motivational for your school? 7

8 Southern Regional Education Board Jigsaw: A Broader Definition of Rigor #1’s – excerpt from Crafting a New Vision for High School #2’s – excerpt from The Next Generation of School Accountability #3’s – excerpts from Ready for Tomorrow #4’s – excerpts from Toward a More Comprehensive Conception of College Readiness #5’s – excerpts from issues of 2009 and 2010 HSTW Best Practices Newsletters 8

9 Southern Regional Education Board Jigsaw 9 After moving back into your “home” groups, develop a definition of rigor that will be meaningful and motivational for your school. Write it on chart paper for others to review.

10 Southern Regional Education Board Rigor is not 10

11 Southern Regional Education Board Rigor is not Assessing Academic Rigor 11

12 Southern Regional Education Board Rigor is not

13 Southern Regional Education Board Rigor is not Assessing Academic Rigor 13 For selected group of students

14 Southern Regional Education Board Rigor is not

15 Southern Regional Education Board Webster’s Definition of RIGOR To be stiff; the quality of being unyielding or inflexible; a condition that makes life difficult, challenging or uncomfortable.

16 Southern Regional Education Board What is rigor? One definition: “Rigor is the goal of helping students develop the capacity to understand content that is complex, ambiguous, provocative, and personally or emotionally challenging.” Harvey F. Silver, Richard W. Strong, and Matthew J. Perini

17 Southern Regional Education Board Cycle of Low Achievement 17 Low Expectations Low Level Assignments / Instruction Poor Test Results Less Challengin g Courses

18 Southern Regional Education Board The Proficiency Gap States set their own standards and create their own tests. How can we compare state to state? NAEP scores are nationwide study mapping state standards in reading and math to NAEP scale: most were below the “proficient” standard, and many fall below the “basic” standard. 18 Source: Adapted from National Center for Education Statistics (2007, June).

19 Southern Regional Education Board Reading, Grade 8 19 Source: National Center for Education Statistics (2007, June).

20 Southern Regional Education Board Math, Grade 8 20 Source: National Center for Education Statistics (2007, June).

21 Southern Regional Education Board 2005 NAEP HS Transcript Study Graduates whose highest mathematics course was geometry or below had average NAEP mathematics scores below the Basic achievement level; those who took calculus had average NAEP scores at the Proficient level. 21 Source: National Center for Education Statistics (2007b).

22 Southern Regional Education Board 2005 NAEP HS Transcript Study Graduates whose highest science course was chemistry or below had average NAEP science scores below the Basic achievement level; those who had completed physics or other advanced science courses had average scores at the Basic level. Graduates who had completed a rigorous curriculum or had GPAs placing them in the top 25 percent of graduates had higher average NAEP scores than other graduates. 22 Source: National Center for Education Statistics (2007b).

23 Southern Regional Education Board College Readiness: What Is It? “College readiness can be defined as the level of preparation a student needs in order to enroll and succeed — without remediation — in a credit- bearing general education course at a postsecondary institution that offers a baccalaureate degree or transfer to a baccalaureate program.” Source: Conley (2007). 23

24 Southern Regional Education Board Current Readiness Measures Course titles Grade point averages Tests AP Courses Source: Conley (2007). 24

25 Southern Regional Education Board 25 Food For Thought “All too often, the label on the course does not match what the student actually received and learned. As a result, we have course completion data exaggerating the readiness of the student. What they essentially have is orange drink in cartons labeled 'orange juice.’” − Chrys Dougherty, Director of Research, National Center for Educational Accountability

26 Southern Regional Education Board Better Readiness Measures Habits of mind Key content Academic behaviors Contextual skills and awareness; problem- based learning Application-based learning through authentic problems and projects Blended programs of academic and CT studies Alternative assessments Source: Conley (2007) and SREB, The Next Generation of School Accountability,

27 Southern Regional Education Board Key Concepts: Carousel Brainstorming On each flipchart: Read what others have written. Write down your ideas of how to use this concept to increase academic press. Two minutes at each chart! 27

28 Southern Regional Education Board The Rigor Rubric Measuring eight dimensions of school practices Each dimension has five different elements which can be scored on four levels of the rubric The total score for the dimension is an average of the five elements, tallied at the bottom of each page 28

29 Southern Regional Education Board Collecting Data on the Rubric Subjective; perceptions can be supported with examples of evidence Consensus agreement is a collaborative process which provides opportunities for discussion and common understanding By leadership committee, sample (grade or department levels), or entire faculty A measuring tool for monitoring at specified intervals (3−12 months) 29

30 1. Assessment in the Classroom: Classroom assessments are rigorous if they provide specific information about student achievement of the learning and content in high standards. Level 1 Not Ready 0 points Level 2 Getting Ready for Implementation 10 points Level 3 Emerging Implementation 20 points Level 4 Schoolwide Implementation 30 points a. Alignment to Standards (Score _30___ ) Some classroom assessments are strongly aligned to the cognitive complexity and topics of the grade-level state standards. Most classroom assessments are strongly aligned to the cogniti`ve complexity and topics of the grade-level state standards. All classroom assessments are strongly aligned to the cognitive complexity and topics of the grade- level state standards and, when appropriate, go beyond grade-level standards. b. Common Benchmark Assessments (Score __30__ ) Common assessments are administered across some grades, subjects or courses. Common assessments, which include high levels of cognitive complexity, are administered across most grades, subjects or courses. Common assessments, which include high levels of cognitive complexity, are administered across all grades, subjects or courses and are regularly analyzed and revised by learning teams. c. Using Assessment Results (Score _20___ ) Teachers analyze test results to improve assessments. Teachers analyze test results to diagnose student learning and improve assessments and instruction. Teachers analyze tests results to diagnose student learning, improve assessments and instruction, and modify curriculum. d. Assessment Literacy (Score _30___ ) Teachers are generally assessment literate, understanding where and when to use a variety of assessments and recognizing quality assessments. Teachers can select high-quality, technically correct assessment items/tasks that are aligned to higher levels of learning. Teachers can select, develop and/or revise assessment items/tasks to measure higher levels of learning. e. Assessment Monitoring (Score _20___ ) The principal and/or learning team monitors classroom assessments in some grades, subjects or courses. The principal and/or learning team monitors classroom assessments in most grades, subjects and courses. The principal and/or professional learning team monitors and recommends revisions for classroom assessments in all grades, subjects and courses. Score Tally on Assessment in the Classroom: a. ___ + b. ___ + c. ___ + d. ___ + e. ___ = ____ / 5 = __26___

31 2. Collaboration: Collaboration within and outside of the school is important to build a common understanding and consistent application of practices that support rigor. Level 1 Not Ready 0 points Level 2 Getting Ready for Implementation 10 points Level 3 Emerging Implementation 20 points Level 4 Schoolwide Implementation 30 points a. Focusing Improvement (Score _30___ ) Occasionally faculty, department and grade-level meetings focus on improving curriculum, instruction and assessment. The focus of faculty, department and grade-level meetings is often the improvement of curriculum, instruction and assessment. All faculty, department and grade-level meetings focus on the improvement of curriculum, instruction and assessments, include formal agendas, and support continuous collaboration throughout the year. b. Using an Organizing Framework (Score _10___ ) Learning teams or study groups review academic rigor based on judgment or assessment data. Learning teams or study groups use an organizing framework (taxonomy) to examine academic rigor. Learning teams or whole faculty study groups use an organizing framework (taxonomy) to produce a common way of thinking about and a common vocabulary for talking about academic rigor schoolwide. c. Analyzing Teachers ’ Work (Score _10___ ) Teachers collaboratively review assignments and assessments. Teachers collaboratively analyze assignments and assessments for cognitive complexity and alignment to standards. Teachers collaboratively analyze and revise assignments and assessments to increase the cognitive complexity and alignment to standards. d. Creating Challenging Learning Opportunities (Score __20__ ) Teachers collaborate in isolated instances to create opportunities that challenge students to perform at higher levels of learning. Teachers collaborate within some departments or grade levels to create opportunities that challenge students to perform at higher levels of learning. Teachers collaborate across the school to create opportunities that challenge students to perform at higher levels of learning. e. Communicating with Home and the Community (Score 10 ) Some school-home communication from teachers about academic progress (students ’ assignments and assessment results and mastery of standards) occurs. Regular school-home communication from teachers about academic progress (students ’ assignments and assessment results and mastery of standards) occurs. Frequent communication (via multiple methods) to home and community about academic progress and increasing rigor school-wide occurs. Score Tally on Collaboration: a. ___ + b. ___ + c. ___ + d. ___ + e. ___ = ____ / 5 = __ 16 ___

32 3. Coursetaking or Grouping Patterns: Examining students ’ coursetaking patterns or identifying school practices for student grouping is important to understand the rigor of the curriculum that individual students experience. Level 1 Not Ready 0 points Level 2 Getting Ready for Implementation 10 points Level 3 Emerging Implementation 20 points Level 4 Schoolwide Implementation 30 points a. Counseling and Advisement (Score_10___ ) Guidance counselors and teachers depend more on subjective data (judgments/opinions) about student ability than on objective data (precise measurements) for student placement in courses or with teachers. Guidance counselors and teachers determine students ’ abilities to achieve at higher levels of learning based on objective data (using subjective judgments only when appropriate) for student placement in courses. Guidance counselors and teachers use objective and subjective data to encourage student placement in college or career-preparatory classes that challenge students that challenge students to their fullest potential. b. Accelerating Readiness (Score _10___ ) Groups of students who are behind in the coursework necessary for readiness for the next grade level, college, or the workplace are “ tracked ” into a curriculum with lower expectations. Individual students who are behind in the coursework necessary for readiness for the next grade level, college, or the workplace are provided remedial classes to “ catch up. ” All students are required to be proficient in the coursework necessary for readiness for the next grade level, college, or the workplace, and the school provides the necessary support to accelerate learning for students who are behind. c. Course Availability: High Schools and Middle Schools ONLY (Score _20___ ) Gatekeeper and honors classes are available for selected students only. Gatekeeper and honors classes are open to participation by all students and maintain high course standards while providing student support as needed. The school actively encourages all students to participate in all rigorous courses, including Advanced Placement (AP) courses and/or the International Baccalaureate (IB) curriculum. d. Graduation Requirements: High Schools ONLY (Score _10___ ) Graduation requirements are aligned with the state requirements for high schools. Graduation requirements are aligned with the entrance requirements of the state ’ s colleges and universities. The rigor of classes required for graduation is aligned with the rigor of credit-bearing first year courses in the state ’ s colleges and universities. e. Equitable Access: High Schools ONLY (Score _10___ ) Data are collected and analyzed to determine how many students are enrolled in various learning opportunities. Data from master schedules or transcript analyses are reviewed to determine whether there is equitable access to learning opportunities. Data from master schedules or transcript analyses are reviewed and school practices changed to provide students equitable access to opportunities and, if needed, additional rigorous courses. Elementary Schools ONLY Score Tally on Coursetaking/Grouping Patterns: a. ___ + b. ___ = ____ /2 = ____ Middle Schools ONLY Score Tally on Coursetaking/Grouping Patterns: a. ___ + b. ___ + c. ___ = ____ /3 = ____ High Schools ONLY Score Tally on Coursetaking/Grouping Patterns: a. ___ + b. ___ + c. ___ + d. ___ + e. ___ = ____ /5 = _ 12 ___

33 4. Curriculum Coherence: The organization and sequencing of the curriculum is critical if students are to perform at higher levels of learning. Level 1 Not Ready 0 points Level 2 Getting Ready for Implementation 10 points Level 3 Emerging Implementation 20 points Level 4 Schoolwide Implementation 30 points a. Curriculum Alignment (Score __20__ ) Grade level/subject area curricula are horizontally aligned (focused and connected within each grade/course/subject area). Grade level/subject area curricula are horizontally and vertically aligned (focused and connected within and across grade/course/subject area). The horizontally and vertically aligned curricula are periodically reviewed and realigned to optimize student performance and academic challenge. b. Curriculum Quality (Score _10___ ) There are few strategies in place to ensure a “ tight ” alignment (correlation) among the written, taught and tested curricula. There are strategies in place to ensure a “ tight ” alignment (correlation) among the written, taught and tested curricula in some grades/subjects. Strategies are in place and actions are taken to ensure a “ tight ” alignment (correlation) between the written, taught and tested curricula in most courses/subjects. c. Curriculum Planning (Score _30___ ) A standards-based curriculum guide has been developed for all subjects. A system of curriculum analysis & alignment (e.g., curriculum mapping) is implemented, and the curriculum is revised/developed based on this data. Based on data, a part of the standards-based school curriculum is reviewed/revised each year with a long- term plan to review/revise the entire curriculum every 5  7 years. d. Cognitive Complexity of Learning (Score _20___ ) Learning objectives, assignments and assessments in all classes reflect the learning and content expected for those students (usually articulated in state standards). The standards-based objectives, assignments, and assessments in some classes accelerate the learning to address the expectations for the next grade, college, or the workplace (increasing the level of cognitive complexity). The standards-based objectives, assignments and assessments in most classes accelerate the learning to address the expectations for the next grade, college, or the workplace (increasing the level of cognitive complexity). e. Curriculum Spiraling (Score __ 20__ ) The curricula for a few courses introduce knowledge and skills at developmentally appropriate grade levels and increase the level of cognitive complexity of the knowledge and skills in subsequent years. The curricula for core subjects introduce knowledge and skills at developmentally appropriate grade levels and increase the level of cognitive complexity of the knowledge and skills in subsequent years. The curricula for all subjects introduce knowledge and skills at developmentally appropriate grade levels and increase the level of cognitive complexity of the knowledge and skills in subsequent years. Score Tally on Curriculum Coherence: a. ___ + b. ___ + c. ___ + d. ___ + e. ___ = ____ / 5 = __ 20 ___

34 5. Expectations for Student Work: Expectations that teachers set for quality student work are important to communicate as students are challenged by increased rigor. Level 1 Not Ready 0 points Level 2 Getting Ready for Implementation 10 points Level 3 Emerging Implementation 20 points Level 4 Schoolwide Implementation 30 points a. Explicit Expectations (Score _20___ ) Expectations for performance are explicit in written or oral assignment directions. Expectations for performance are explicit in course syllabi, rubrics and assignment directions in some classes. Expectations for performance are explicit in course syllabi, rubrics and assignment directions in most classes. b. Examples of Student Work (Score _30___ ) Where possible, teachers have students share with their peers graded samples of their work that have been deemed proficient. Teachers provide examples of exemplary student work to students prior to assessments on that material. Teachers require students to analyze exemplary student work, prior to assessment on that material, to determine the qualities that make the work proficient. c. Consensus on Proficiency (Score _20___ ) Some teachers have reached consensus on what constitutes proficiency on grade-level standards. Teachers within grade levels or subject areas have reached consensus on what constitutes proficiency on grade-level standards, and there is little variation among these teachers ’ expectations, rubrics and grading practices. The school ’ s professional staff (teachers and administrators) has reached consensus on what constitutes proficiency on grade-level standards, and there is little variation among teachers ’ expectations, rubrics and grading practices. d. Student Understanding of Quality Work (Score _10___ ) Students are routinely asked to evaluate their own and peers ’ work using scoring rubrics. Student evaluations of their own and peers ’ work sometimes match teacher expectations and/or the scoring rubric. Student evaluations of their own and peers ’ work often match teacher and/or rubric definitions for quality. e. High Expectations for All Students (Score _20___ ) School staff has a collective belief that most students can achieve at grade level. Some teachers provide the opportunity for all students to produce quality work through their grading practices, by re-teaching, and by allowing them to redo work. Schools provide the opportunity for all students to produce quality work with policies related to redoing work, re-teaching and grading. Score Tally on Expectations for Student Work: a. ___ + b. ___ + c. ___ + d. ___ + e. ___ = ____ / 5 = _ 20 ____

35 6. Grading Practices: Grades assigned to student work are symbols of the teachers ’ expectations for quality, beliefs about rigor, and understanding of proficiency evidenced in the classroom. Level 1 Not Ready 0 points Level 2 Getting Ready for Implementation 10 points Level 3 Emerging Implementation 20 points Level 4 Schoolwide Implementation 30 points a. Grading & Reporting System (Score _ 10 ___ ) The school is examining the role of academic and non-achievement factors in grading and reporting student performance. The school has a grading and reporting system that identifies criteria for determining and reporting grades (academic and non-achievement factors). The school has a grading and reporting system that identifies criteria for determining and reporting grades (academic and non-achievement factors and the weighting of those factors). b. Alignment of Classroom Grades to External Assessments (Score __ 20 __ ) Many final course grades for students do not seem to be positively correlated to student performance on external assessments (state and national). Many final course grades for students seem to be positively correlated to student performance on external assessments (state and national). Most final grades are positively correlated to student performance on external assessments (state and national). c. Common Grading Criteria (Score _ 30 ___ ) Common grading criteria (of non-academic and academic factors) have been collaboratively established by teachers in some subject areas, grades and/or courses. Common grading criteria (of non-academic and academic factors) have been collaboratively established by teachers in the core subject areas, grades and/or courses. Common grading criteria (of non-academic and academic factors) have been collaboratively established by teachers in all subject areas, grades and/or courses. d. Communication about Grading Practices (Score _ 10 __ ) Some teachers inform students about grading practices/weighting/points systems in course syllabi, lesson plans and assessments. Most teachers inform students and parents about grading practices/weighting/point systems in course syllabi, lesson plans and assessments. All teachers routinely inform students and parents about grading practices/weighting/point systems in course syllabi, lesson plans and assessments. e. Reporting Academic Performance (Score __ 10 __ ) Summative grades represent the final level of student performance, which may include mastery of standards, progress, participation, engagement, etc. Summative grades represent the final level of student performance, which emphasizes academic factors more than non-academic, and identifies the weighting of academic and non-academic factors. More than one summative grade is reported for each core subject, with one grade measuring mastery of standards exclusively. Other grades might include either a combination of non- academic and academic factors, or only non- academic factors. Score Tally on Grading Practices: a. ___ + b. ___ + c. ___ + d. ___ + e. ___ = ____ / 5 = __ 16 ___

36 7. Instructional Strategies: The instructional strategies that teachers use foster higher levels of learning in their students and increased rigor in their classrooms. Level 1 Not Ready 0 points Level 2 Getting Ready for Implementation 10 points Level 3 Emerging Implementation 20 points Level 4 Schoolwide Implementation 30 points a. Questioning Strategies (Score _30___ ) Teachers ask mostly low-cognitive complexity questions. Teachers use an array of questioning techniques to prompt low, mid and higher level cognitive processing for some students. Teachers use an array of questioning techniques to prompt low, mid and higher level cognitive processing for all students. b. Instruction (Score _30___ ) Instructional strategies are selected based on teacher preference, experience and recommendations in text. Instructional strategies are selected based on the content and level of cognitive complexity in the standards as well as on student preference/interests. Instructional strategies are based on research and selected to match the content and cognitive complexity in the standards and to raise the cognitive complexity of student learning. c. Instructional Leadership (Score _20___ ) Supervisors note presence/absence of rigor in monitoring/evaluation of classroom instruction. Supervisors note frequency of levels of rigor in their monitoring/evaluation of classroom instruction. The levels of rigor of classroom instruction are included in personnel decisions and measures of school accountability. d. Academic Press (Score _10___ ) Faculty members frequently discuss ways to increase rigor, cognitive complexity or higher levels of learning in classrooms. The school ’ s mission and school improvement plan includes statements regarding rigor, cognitive complexity or higher levels of learning. The school is driven by a quest for academic press as evidenced in its mission and school improvement plan ’ s focus on rigor, cognitive complexity and/or high but achievable academic goals. e. Professional Development (Score _20___ ) Teachers ’ support for student learning is improved by professional development opportunities available from external providers. Teachers ’ support for student learning is improved by teams of teacher leaders involved in year-long professional learning to develop schoolwide strategies. Teachers ’ support for student learning is improved by the school ’ s professional development plan which has teacher teams learning, implementing and evaluating schoolwide strategies. Score Tally on Instructional Practices: a. ___ + b. ___ + c. ___ + d. ___ + e. ___ = ____ / 5 = __ 20 ___

37 8. Student Support: Supporting students so that they can learn across all levels of cognitive complexity is an important component of increasing rigor in the school. Level 1 Not Ready 0 points Level 2 Getting Ready for Implementation 10 points Level 3 Emerging Implementation 20 points Level 4 Schoolwide Implementation 30 points a. Extra Help (Score _20___ ) Teachers provide extra help at the request of students or their families. Teachers provide extra help to students through regularly scheduled tutorials. A network of teacher support provides extra help before and after each school day and is required for some students to attend. b. System of Interventions (Score _20___ ) The primary supports for students who fail courses or are retained at a current grade level are traditional remediation strategies. The primary support for students who are performing below basic proficiency on assignments and assessments is a system of escalating interventions. The primary support for students who are performing below basic proficiency on assignments and assessments is a well-organized, early warning and intervention system to accelerate learning. c. Credit Recovery (Score _10___ ) Additional credits are awarded students based on summer coursework. Additional credits are awarded students based on concurrent “ credit recovery ” opportunities. Additional credits are awarded students based on demonstration of achievement on standards. d. Student Progress (Score _20___ ) Students progress at different rates in the classroom because of students ’ efforts. Students progress at different rates in the classroom because of differentiation in assignments, supportive instruction and redoing work. Students progress at different rates in the curriculum because of placement in double- blocked or accelerated courses, tutorial classes, and dual enrollment programs. e. Literacy Support (Score _30___ ) Support to reduce literacy barriers related to performing at higher levels of learning in their classroom is provided by some teachers. Support to reduce literacy barriers related to performing at higher levels of learning in their classroom is provided by teachers and literacy coaches. Support to reduce literacy barriers related to performing at higher levels of learning in their classroom is part of a schoolwide literacy initiative providing direction for the work of literacy coaches, teachers and students. Score Tally on Student Support: a. ___ + b. ___ + c. ___ + d. ___ + e. ___ = ____ / 5 = __ 20 ___

38 Southern Regional Education Board School Level Evidence of Rigor 1.Complete a self-assessment of schoolwide practices 2.Choose priority areas to target for improvement 3.Identify goals and strategies for improvement. 4.Please be prepared to debrief and share out with the whole group. See planner pages

39 Southern Regional Education Board Best Practices Share Fair We will use a variation of an information sharing cooperative learning structure, Team Inside-Outside Circle. First School presents Roundrobin appreciation of the school’s implementation of rigor, raising expectations and effort. Roundrobin feedback for next steps for continued improvement Repeat the process with the next school’s explanation. 39

40 Southern Regional Education Board Reflections on the Day 40


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