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TEXAS LITERACY INITIATIVE OVERVIEW ROUTINES/STRATEGIES & SUMMER INSTITUTE Focus: Grades 6 - 12 2014 - 2015 Presented by PACE EARLY COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL.

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Presentation on theme: "TEXAS LITERACY INITIATIVE OVERVIEW ROUTINES/STRATEGIES & SUMMER INSTITUTE Focus: Grades 6 - 12 2014 - 2015 Presented by PACE EARLY COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL."— Presentation transcript:

1 TEXAS LITERACY INITIATIVE OVERVIEW ROUTINES/STRATEGIES & SUMMER INSTITUTE Focus: Grades Presented by PACE EARLY COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL TLI Teacher Specialist Patricia Cisneros Young

2 Do your students look like this??? 2 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System Video

3 Reading With Purpose

4 Comprehension Purpose Questions (CPQs) Thoughtful “questions appear to be effective for improving learning from reading because they: give students a purpose for reading; focus students’ attention on what they are to learn; help students to think actively as they read; encourage students to monitor their comprehension; and help students to review content and relate what they have learned to what they already know” (CIERA, 2003). Copyright 2012 Texas Education Agency and the University of Texas System

5 Going From Good to Great! A good CPQ: Is answered in the text either explicitly or implicitly. Involves student thinking. Will focus on comprehension. Relates to student learning. A great CPQ: Cannot be completely answered until students have read the entire text. Involves higher order thinking, inferences, text evidence or synthesis of information. Will deepen and extend comprehension. Gets at the heart of what you want students to understand. Relates to the cognitive strategy(ies) currently being taught. 5

6 Think-Turn-Talk

7 Think-time Think-Turn-Talk provides think-time (also referred to as wait-time) for all students, but especially for those who need it. Let’s consider think-time. – How long do you predict think-time usually lasts after a teacher asks a question? 7 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

8 Think-time Positive effects on students: “The length and correctness of their responses increase. The number of their ‘I don't know’ and no answer responses decreases. The number of volunteered, appropriate answers by larger numbers of students greatly increases. The scores of students on academic achievement tests tend to increase.” (Stahl, 1994) 1.5 seconds 3 seconds Copyright 2012 Texas Education Agency and the University of Texas System 8

9 Application “…the brain learns best when it ‘does’, rather than when it ‘absorbs’ [Pally, 1997]. Thus, all students must think at a high level to solve knotty problems and to transform the ideas and information they encounter.” (Tomlinson & Kalbfleisch, 1998, p. 54) Copyright 2012 Texas Education Agency and the University of Texas System 9

10 Vocabulary and Oral Language Development

11 Vocabulary Words that make up speech (oral) or text (reading and writing) and their meanings Distinctions: – Receptive vocabulary: Requires a reader to associate a specific meaning with a given label Oral vocabulary Reading vocabulary – Expressive vocabulary: Requires a speaker or writer to produce a specific label for a particular meaning Oral vocabulary Writing vocabulary (Cunningham, 2005; Nagy, 2005; Stahl & Nagy, 2006) © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System 11

12 Vocabulary Instruction: What It Is Indirect: Engagement in discussions and reading Direct: Explicit instruction of words through the following: – Teaching the use of context – Using models, demonstrations, illustrations, graphic organizers, and classroom discussions (Cunningham, 2005; Nagy, 2005; Stahl & Nagy, 2006) © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System 12

13 Why Should We Teach Vocabulary? Cumulative Monthly Vocabulary Spoken in the Home Children in professional homes1,100 words Children in working-class homes700 words Children in high-poverty homes500 words Each month, children in high-poverty homes are exposed to 600 fewer different words than children in professional homes. By age 4, children in high-poverty homes have heard 32 million fewer words than those in professional homes. (Hart & Risley, 2003) © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System 13

14 Why Should We Teach Vocabulary Explicitly and Systematically? Vocabulary knowledge is the key that unlocks the meaning of text: Vocabulary knowledge improves comprehension and fluency. Research has shown that direct and explicit vocabulary instruction is an effective way for students to acquire vocabulary knowledge. (Hiebert & Kamil, 2005; McKeown & Beck, 2004; National Center for Education Statistics, 2012; Stahl & Nagy, 2006) © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System 14

15 Effective Vocabulary Instruction: Things to Remember Teach vocabulary throughout the day and across content areas. Create opportunities for interactive classroom talk. Engage students in discussions of words, their meanings, and their uses, usually through read-alouds. Make connections to students’ background knowledge. Teach word meanings directly. Use multiple strategies to involve students in active exploration of words. (August et al., 2005; Hiebert & Kamil, 2005; McKeown & Beck, 2004; Stahl & Nagy, 2006) © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System 15

16 Effective Vocabulary Instruction: Things to Remember (cont.) Ensure that students encounter new words multiple times. Use dictionaries strategically. Use semantic maps and graphic organizers. Use examples and nonexamples. Explain synonyms and antonyms. Engage students in activities that require them to determine relationships among, between, and within words. (August et al., 2005; Hiebert & Kamil, 2005; McKeown & Beck, 2004; Stahl & Nagy, 2006) © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System 16

17 Cognitive Strategies Making Inferences & Predictions Determining Importance & Summarizing Monitoring & Clarifying Making Connections Asking & Answering Questions Creating Mental Images 17 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

18 18 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System COGNITIVE STRATEGIES

19 Why Cognitive Strategies? “The idea behind explicit instruction of text comprehension is that comprehension can be improved by teaching students to use specific cognitive strategies or to reason strategically when they encounter barriers to comprehension when reading” (NRP as cited in Torgesen, 2007). 19 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

20 Making Connections Grades 6-12

21 3 Types of Connections Text-to-Self Text-to-Text Text-to-World 21 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System Activate Background Knowledge and Make Connections Paired Selections Making Inferences and Predictions

22 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System Grades 6 – 12

23 “Inferences are really important and great readers make them all the time. An inference is something a reader knows from reading, but the author doesn’t include it in the book. It helps you understand the story more deeply and helps make books mean something very personal to you.” (Keene & Zimmermann, 2007, p. 148)

24 24 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System Pedigree Charts, Chapter 14, p. 342 What are the genotypes of both parents on the left in the second row? How do you know? At the top of the chart is a grandfather. Grandfather has the heterozygous trait. At the top of the chart is a grandfather … The grandfather must be heterozygous for the trait. Dad must be heterozygous, because only one of his parents has the trait and he has the trait. We don’t’ know about mom’s parents, but since only one of their kids has the trait, mom has to be heterozygous. If she was homozygous, then both kids would have the trait. direct Square represents a male; circle a female. Shaded shape indicates the trait. Horizontal line = marriage. Vertical line = children. direct Both parents have the heterozygous genotype for the white forelock. inference Square represents male; circle female. Shaded…expresses the trait; not shaded does not express trait. Horizontal line reps marriage. Vertical line reps children. Circle (mom) and square (dad) are shaded. The grandfather of the male has the trait. They are linked to two circles (children). Only one circle is shaded. Figure 14-3 Text Figure 14-3 My Answers to the CPQ

25 Annotating the Text “Annotating text is one of the most common comprehension-enhancing strategies used by proficient readers (Daniels & Steineke, 2011, p. 41). “When students capture their thinking while reading, they are more likely to return to texts, participate in discussion and have an easier time starting writing assignments. They also use their marked text to review and study” (Tovani, 2004, p. 68).

26 Annotating the Text Text Excerpt 87 years ago (1776 when the Declaration of Independence was signed) marked the beginning of our nation. The country was founded on the idea that all men are created equally. At the time of this speech, Lincoln was looking to abolish slavery. CPQ: What is Lincoln saying in this speech?

27 27 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System Now, he’s wondering if our nation will survive because of the war. He’s come to dedicate a portion of the battlefield as a memorial to those who have died in the war. Consecrate: To dedicate, honor. Hallow: To honor as holy. Dedicate, consecrate, and hallow all have similar meanings. So, he’s stressing the importance of this idea. It isn’t necessary to have a president declare this battleground an honored place, because the brave who have died have already made it an honored place.

28 Annotating the Text After we model multiple times for students, we can annotate text together (Step 6). Gradually, we release responsibly so students are able to successfully annotate complex chunks of texts independently (Step 8), increasing their ability to make inferences and predictions while reading. 28 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

29 Teaching Making Inferences Graphic Organizers – highly supportive. Annotating Text – less supportive. 29 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

30 CREATING MENTAL IMAGES 30 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

31 “Visualizing strengthens our inferential thinking. When we visualize, we are in fact inferring, but with mental images rather than words and thoughts. When we create mental images we take the words from the text and mix them with our background knowledge to create a picture in our mind. We use all of our senses to create mental images. In literary texts, this helps us to understand what the setting looks like, what a character looks like, how characters are behaving, etc. In informational text, creating mental images helps us to understand the dimensions of size, space and time.” (Harvey & Goudvis, 2007, p. 130) 31 Creating Mental Images

32 Increase motivation and engagement Improve literal comprehension Improve integration of new information with background knowledge Aid in making inferences, identifying main ideas, and determining importance Help students to uncover text structures Makes texts memorable and increases retention (Kelley, & Clausen-Grace, 2013, Zwiers, 2010, Wilhelm, 2004) Why Should We Teach Creating Mental Images?

33 Creating Mental Images 33 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

34 Big Ideas Don’t make assumptions. All 5 senses and emotions. Mental images vary. Vivid text. 34

35 Determining Importance & Summarizing Informational Text Grade 6 − Grade 12 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

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37 It helps readers to… Improve overall comprehension. Manage excessive amounts of information. Focus attention. Extract relevant information. Build relationships among concepts contained in text. (CIERA 2003; Coyne, Chard, Zipoli, & Ruby, 2007; Duke & Pearson, 2002; Keene & Zimmermann, 2007 Silver, Strong, & Perini, 2000; Thiede & Anderson, 2003) ) Why Should We Teach Determining Importance & Summarizing?

38 It helps readers to… Understand author’s purpose. Remember text. Identify theme. Make connections. Monitor understanding. (CIERA 2003; Coyne, Chard, Zipoli, & Ruby, 2007; Duke & Pearson, 2002; Keene & Zimmermann, 2007 Silver, Strong, & Perini, 2000; Thiede & Anderson, 2003) Why Should We Teach Determining Importance & Summarizing?

39 Determining Importance & Summarizing? How Should We Teach

40 40 Topic, Main Idea, or Summary? TermDefinitionExample TopicWho or what the text is about; can often be expressed in one or two words. Sharks Main IdeaWhat the text says about the topic; can often be expressed in one sentence or less. Sharks do many things. SummaryA synthesis of the important ideas in a text; may be of varying length, expressed in the reader’s own words and should reflect the structure of the text. Sharks swim through the oceans hunting for prey, such as fish and seals. Sometimes, they work together to attack prey and may even engage in playful activities. (Silver, Strong, & Perini, 2000; CIERA, 2003)

41 Considerations for Teaching Students to Identify Topic “Usually the topic will be apparent by looking at the title, pictures, or subheadings … Higher level text may confuse students by dancing around the topic instead of stating it directly. In these cases, teach students to look for repeated references to help them find a topic.” (Kissner, 2006, p. 34) 41 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

42 DETERMINE IMPORTANCE AND IDENTIFY MAIN IDEA Considerations for Teaching Students to 42 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

43 Main Idea “Finding the main idea has never been fun for most struggling readers. They have been asked to find it countless times and have produced inadequate answers.” “Getting the main idea is a complex and challenging habit to develop, and it gets more challenging as texts become more complex in middle school and high school.” (Zwiers, 210, pp ) 43 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

44 Main Idea The main idea can usually be stated in one sentence or less. A main idea sentence: Includes the topic. Includes the important information that is said about the topic. Might include a statement about the purpose of the text (Why was the text written?). 44 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

45 Determining Importance Toolbox 45

46 Look for a Main Idea Sentence Main ideas can be directly stated in the text or inferred. “Baumann (1986) found that only about 15% of paragraphs in adult expository material have the topic sentence in the initial position. He also found that only 30% of the paragraphs have the main idea explicitly stated anywhere in the paragraph. These findings strongly suggest that we must teach students to overcome the lack of an explicitly stated main idea.” (Zwiers, 2010, p. 36) 46 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

47 Look for Repeated Words or Phrases Important information is often repeated. Good readers look for repeated words or phrases that carry similar meaning. If authors are repeating ideas or concepts in various ways, then likely that information is important. 47 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

48 Table of Contents Titles, headings and subheadings Font (colored, italics, bold) Graphics (e.g., photos, diagrams, maps, timelines, etc.) Captions and labels Definitions and pronunciation guide 48 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System Use Text Features

49 Chunk the Text 49 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System “…readers who are unaware of text structure do not approach text with any particular plan of action. Consequently, they tend to retrieve information from the text in a seemingly random way. Students aware of text structure on the other hand, tend to “chunk” or organize the text as they read.” (Snow, 2002, p.40)

50 Descriptive Sequential/Chronological Cause and Effect Compare and Contrast Problem and Solution 50 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System Five Main Text Structures ?

51 Reread and Discuss to Clarify and Identify Main Ideas in the Text “Helping students become conscious and engaged about what they are reading is an important aspect of reading for meaning and summarization. ‘Good readers read text passages at least twice: once to get the general overview and then again to determine what is salient’ ( Wormeli, 2005, p. 22). Providing them practice and time to reread text will help them have a better understanding of the purpose for the reading.” (Smith & Zygouris-Coe, 2006, July) 51 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

52 Reread and Discuss to Clarify and Identify Main Ideas in the Text Reread to clarify and confirm the main idea. Discuss to consolidate understanding and remember the text better. 52 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

53 SUMMARIZE INFORMATIONAL TEXT Considerations for Teaching Students to 53 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

54 Summarizing “…summarizing helps us to understand and make meaning of the events of everyday life—what we read, what we view, what we experience.” (Kissner, 2006, p.3) 54 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

55 55 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System “To summarize effectively, students need to recognize main ideas and key details, disregard unimportant or repetitive ideas, construct topic sentences, paraphrase, and collapse or combine lists or events into general statements.” (Graham, S., MacArthur, C., & Fitzgerald, J., 2013, p.339) Summarizing

56 A summary should: Reflect the structure of the text. Include a topic sentence. Include the main ideas. Include important details. Be paraphrased and shorter than the original text. 56 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

57 Keep in mind that identifying text structure is not the goal. The goal is for students to internalize knowledge about text structure and use it to enhance their reading comprehension and improve their writing organization. (Orcutt, K., n.d.) 57 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

58 Cognitive Strategies Coming Attractions Making Inferences & Predictions Determining Importance & Summarizing Monitoring & Clarifying Making Connections Asking & Answering Questions Creating Mental Images 58 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

59 Every Kid Needs A Champion Video 59 © 2013 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

60 Texas Literacy Initiative Highlights 2014 LEADERSHIP SUMMIT & TLI SUMMER INSTITUTE District Level Support of the Texas State Literacy Plan Prepared by, BISD DLL’s at UT Health Science Center at Houston

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63 Opening Session Objectives Review the Texas Literacy Initiative (TLI) grant goals Review the Texas State Literacy Plan (TSLP) components Introduce the TSLP Version 2.0 Review the TSLP resources 63 © 2014 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

64 Texas Literacy Initiative Grant Goals 1.Increase the oral language and pre-literacy skills of preschool children. 2.Increase the performance of students in K-2 on early reading assessments. 3.Increase the percentage of students who meet or exceed proficiency on the state English Language Arts assessments in grades Increase the use of data to inform all decision making. 5.Increase the implementation of effective literacy instruction. 64 © 2014 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

65 The Texas State Literacy Plan (TSLP) 65 © 2014 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

66 66 The TSLP Online © 2014 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

67 67 © 2014 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System The Texas State Literacy Plan

68 TSLP Component Specifics Leadership – Leadership teams meet regularly to examine student performance data; determine what students need to be successful; create a plan of action for providing resources of time, materials, and professional development; and implement the plan and evaluate results. 68 © 2014 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

69 Language & Pre-literacy Development Plan/Data- informed Plan District – TLI goals for the Literacy Line Site/Campus Improvement Plans – A Language and Pre-Literacy Development Plan (LPLD) for each age 0-School Entry site – A Data-informed Plan (DiP) for each K-12 campus LPLD/DIP include -targeted goals; -action steps to accomplish the goals; -resources necessary to support achievement of the goals; -individuals responsible for monitoring progress towards the goals; -interim progress monitoring checkpoints; and -timelines for completion of the action steps. 69 © 2014 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

70 Language & Pre-literacy Development Plan/Data- informed Plan District – TLI goals for the Literacy Line Site/Campus Improvement Plans – A Language and Pre-Literacy Development Plan (LPLD) for each age 0-School Entry site – A Data-informed Plan (DiP) for each K-12 campus LPLD/DIP include -targeted goals; -action steps to accomplish the goals; -resources necessary to support achievement of the goals; -individuals responsible for monitoring progress towards the goals; -interim progress monitoring checkpoints; and -timelines for completion of the action steps. 70 © 2014 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

71 TSLP Component Specifics Assessment – Assessment provides the foundation for collecting student data and guides decision making at every level including determining specific instructional needs; identifying students at risk of difficulties; and evaluating the success of learning. 71 © 2014 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

72 TSLP Component Specifics Standards-Based Instruction – SBI ensures that there is a solid foundation of instruction based on the Texas Infant, Toddler, and Three-Year-Old Early Learning Guidelines; Texas Prekindergarten Guidelines; and Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (in both English and Spanish). 72 © 2014 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

73 TSLP Component Specifics Effective Instructional Framework – EIF is built on a Response to Intervention (RtI) model that provides a foundation of high quality literacy instruction to all students; and provides additional literacy instruction for students who demonstrate a need for more support. 73 © 2014 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

74 TSLP Component Specifics Reporting and Accountability – Reporting and Accountability ensures that systems are in place to collect and share student data; examine performance data; and communicate progress toward goals. 74 © 2014 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

75 TSLP Component Specifics Sustainability – The ultimate key to ensuring students leave our public schools as college- and career-ready Texans includes leveraging funding resources; evaluating implementation continuously; providing effective professional development; monitoring and supporting teaching and learning; and focusing decision making on data. 75 © 2014 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

76 Daryl Michel Assistant Director, Academic Foundation Initiatives Institute for Public School Initiatives (IPSI) College of Education The University of Texas at Austin

77 77 © 2014 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System The TSLP Online

78 TSLP Version 2.0 All components were revised to facilitate greater alignment across age/grade levels. – Substantial revisions were made to Assessment; Effective Instructional Framework; Reporting and Accountability; and Sustainability. 78 © 2014 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

79 TSLP Online Course 79 © 2014 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System

80 Implementation Map © 2014 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System 80

81 © 2014 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System Resource Library 81

82 Reports © 2014 Texas Education Agency / The University of Texas System 82

83 2014 Summit Focus & Session Objectives 83 Define your role as a Grant Implementation Team (GIT) in supporting TSLP work. Learn a process for GIT support of TSLP implementation. Apply the process at the district level.

84 GIT Support at the District Level 84 1.What are your district’s current literacy needs and priorities? 2.Which TSLP Action Step is the most commonly selected by sites/campuses? 3.How do the literacy needs and priorities of your district align with the Action Step that was commonly selected? Please explain. 4.For the Action Step selected above, which level C Indicator(s) will be the primary focus for your GIT to support? 5.What action(s) will the GIT take to impact the level C Indicator(s) you have selected? 6.How will the GIT build accountability for the actions planned in question 5?

85 Effective Instructional Framework (EIF) Action Steps 85 Effective Instructional Framework: Action Steps 2

86 DISTRICT TSLP SUPPORT Modeling - GIT Support for TSLP Implementation What are your district’s current literacy needs and priorities? 2. Which TSLP Action Step is the most commonly selected by sites/campuses? 3. How do the literacy needs and priorities of your district align with the Action Step that was commonly selected? Please explain. 4. For the Action Step selected above, which level C Indicator(s) will be the primary focus for your GIT to support? 5. What action(s) will the GIT take to impact the level C Indicator(s) you have selected? 6. How will the GIT build accountability for the actions planned in question 5?

87 DISTRICT TSLP SUPPORT Defining – Campus TSLP Support How will the GIT monitor the TSLP Implementation Plan Timeline for each site/campus? 2. How will the GIT support sites/campuses to make adjustments if implementation slows or stalls? 3. How will the GIT provide opportunities for sites/campuses to collaborate? 4. For the Action Step selected above, which level C Indicator(s) will be the primary focus for your GIT to support?

88 DISTRICT TSLP SUPPORT Returning to Your District – NEXT STEPS Accessing Summit Resources: 88 There is a Project Share group where you can access the Summit resources you’ll need. Log into: Find and/or join the group: Texas Literacy Initiative Grantees PLC. Access materials in the Drop Box File: 2014 TLI Leadership Summit. Joining the Texas Literacy Initiative Grantees PLC Log into: On your “My Portal” page in Project Share, click on “Collaboration,” and then on “Groups” in the menu on the left.

89 Final Reflection How will we share what was learned and the work we started at the Summit? When will our GIT meet next? What work did not get done today that our GIT will need to continue? What are the most important points from the Summit to convey to our district, and how will we go about disseminating Summit information? 5 89

90 “Implementation is a process, not an event. Implementation will not happen all at once or proceed smoothly, at least not at first.” (Blase, K., Fixsen, D., Friedman, R., Naoom, S., & Wallace, F., 2005) 90

91 Foundations Discuss the foundation on which explicit instruction is based. Describe the research, 16 elements, and three underlying principles of explicit instruction. How well you teach = How well they learn Optimizing academic learning time Promoting high levels of success Optimizing amount of content covered 91 DescriptionHighlights

92 Lesson Design Outline an explicit instruction lesson: opening, closing, and body (I DO, WE DO, YOU DO). Teaching is never a static procedure Opening – Gaining attention – Reviewing and previewing Body – Teaching skills and strategies – Guided practice – Types of prompts Closing – Reviewing and previewing Assigning independent work 92 DescriptionHighlights

93 Lesson Design Outline an explicit instruction lesson: opening, closing, and body (I DO, WE DO, YOU DO). Teaching is never a static procedure Opening – Gaining attention – Reviewing and previewing Body – Teaching skills and strategies – Guided practice – Types of prompts Closing – Reviewing and previewing Assigning independent work 93 DescriptionHighlights

94 Classroom Organization Emphasize the effective use of available space and the development of rules, routines, and procedures. Space communicates What you expect = What you get 94 DescriptionHighlights Predictability predicts ability Avoid the void, for they will fill it Classroom organization Goals and rules Routines and procedures Active engagement  Buffer activities  Sponge activities

95 Instructional Delivery Focus on fostering active participation and eliciting responses. Many responses, many responders Active participation – Verbal responses – Partner considerations – Team considerations – Structured choral responses Written responses – Response slates – Response cards Action responses 95 DescriptionHighlights

96 Responsive Literacy Instruction Define response to intervention (RTI). Explore how the RTI model can help us create a framework for all students’ success, not just struggling students. Defining RTI Using data to identify needs Examining Tier I instruction Examining Tier II strategic interventions Examining Tier III intensive interventions 96 DescriptionHighlights

97 Planning for Tier I Instruction Take an in-­-depth look at planning considerations for core literacy instruction. Planning steps critical for Tier I instruction Planning considerations for literacy components I DO, WE DO, YOU DO lesson cycle and planning for Tier I instruction Reflection on planning for Tier I instruction 97 DescriptionHighlights

98 Planning for Tiers II and III Instruction Take an in-­‐depth look at planning literacy instruction in Tiers II and III. Planning steps critical for Tiers II and III instruction Planning considerations for literacy components I DO, WE DO, YOU DO lesson cycle and planning for Tiers II and III instruction Reflection on planning for Tiers II and III instruction 98 DescriptionHighlights

99 Conclusion Recall what we learned and identify our goals, benefits, and next steps. Reviewing important learning Identifying goals Identifying benefits Identifying next steps 99 DescriptionHighlights

100 References Blase, K. A., Fixsen, D. L., Naoom, S. F., & Wallace, F. (2005). Operationalizing implementation: Strategies and methods. Tampa: University of South Florida, Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute. McKinsey & Co. (2007). How the world’s best-performing schools come out on top. Retrieved from top. Texas Literacy Initiative. (2014). The Texas state literacy plan: A guide for creating comprehensive site/campus-based literacy programs (version 2.0). Texas Education Agency. 100


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