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WHAT TO DO WHEN IT’S UP TO YOU. COUNTING TO TEN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Family Campers and RVers 2011.

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Presentation on theme: "WHAT TO DO WHEN IT’S UP TO YOU. COUNTING TO TEN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Family Campers and RVers 2011."— Presentation transcript:

1 WHAT TO DO WHEN IT’S UP TO YOU. COUNTING TO TEN Family Campers and RVers 2011

2 DISASTER COMES IN MANY FORMS Natural crisis (weather emergencies)  Fires  Floods  Tornados  Earthquakes Man made crisis  Terrorism  Violence  Accidents Personal crisis  Illness  Financial or property crisis Family Campers and RVers 2011

3 KEYS TO SURVIVAL Preparation Putting it together Performance Keeping it together Family Campers and RVers 2011

4 Information taken from FEMA Publication ARE YOU READY? An In-depth Guide to Citizen Preparedness A downloadable booklet From the FEMA website Family Campers and RVers 2011

5 It can happen to you The people in Joplin, Missouri, did not expect their town to be destroyed in 15 minutes. The people in Washington, D.C., did not expect an earthquake to disrupt their day. The people in Vermont did not expect that a hurricane could cause such widespread destruction in their location. EXPECTED OR UNEXPECTED IT HAPPENED Family Campers and RVers 2011

6 PREPARATION PREVENTS PANIC You cannot “plan” during an acute crisis, so planning has to occur ahead of time. During a crisis, put plans into action Family Campers and RVers 2011

7 SURVIVAL BEGINS WITH PREPARATION  Survival Kit in place  Emergency plans  Communication Strategies  Shelter in Place… when and how  Evacuation plans… when and how Family Campers and RVers 2011

8 PUTTING IT TOGETHER HAVE A SURVIVAL KIT IN PLACE Everything essential for at least 3 days. FOOD and WATER FIRST AID and MEDICATION WARMTH AIR COMMUNICATION SANITATION Family Campers and RVers 2011

9 HAVE PERSONAL “READY-BAGS” FOR EVERYONE Family Campers and RVers 2011 IN INDIVIDUAL BACKPACKS, LOAD Change of clothing Container of water Granola or other stable, nutritional food items Whistle Flashlight Phone numbers of family contact person Essential medication Anything specifically needed (diapers, formula, etc.)

10 FAMILY EMERGENCY PLAN Identify an out-of town contact with whom family members who are separated by an emergency can communicate. Prepare family members with the phone number Coins or a prepaid phone card Make sure to tell your family and friends that you’ve listed them as emergency contacts. Family Campers and RVers 2011

11 STAY OR GO? The first important decision is whether you Stay where you are Evacuate You should understand and plan for both possibilities. Depends on your circumstances and the nature of the emergency Use common sense and available information. Watch TV, listen to the radio, or check the Internet for information or official instruction as it becomes available Family Campers and RVers 2011

12 SHELTER IN PLACE Sometimes The best option is to stay where you are Family Campers and RVers 2011

13 SHELTER IN PLACE Why? Protection against CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL RADIATION threat Family Campers and RVers 2011

14 SHELTER IN PLACE Where? an interior room with few windows, if possible Chemical, biological or radiological agents May descend to lowest levels, So the room should NOT be in the lower building levels. Family Campers and RVers 2011

15 SHELTER IN PLACE Prepare ahead of time Select the room Precut plastic sheeting to cover All vents and door/window cracks Have emergency supply kit handy Family Campers and RVers 2011

16 SHELTER IN PLACE How? When you need to shelter Lock doors Close windows, air vents and fireplace dampers. Turn off fans, air conditioning and forced air heating systems. Seal windows, doors and air vents with plastic sheeting and duct tape. Create a barrier between yourself and any contamination. Family Campers and RVers 2011

17 SHELTER IN PLACE How long? Local authorities may not immediately be able to provide information on what is happening Watch TV listen to the radio or check the Internet often for official news and instructions as they become available. More likely in terms of hours rather than days. Family Campers and RVers 2011

18 EVACUATION Sometimes the best option is to go somewhere else Family Campers and RVers 2011

19 EVACUATION PLAN AHEAD Plan meeting places for your family within and outside of your immediate neighborhood. Keep a half tank of gas in the car at all times in case you need to evacuate. Become familiar with alternate routes and other means of transportation out of your area. If you do not have a car, plan how you will leave if you have to. Family Campers and RVers 2011

20 EVACUATION WHEN ADVISED TO EVACUATE Do not delay Leave early to avoid most congestion. Take your emergency supply kit unless you have reason to believe it has been contaminated. Lock the door behind you. Follow the advised routes. “Short Cuts” may be blocked or damaged. Take your pets with you, (Know that only service animals may be permitted in public shelters.) Plan ahead how you will care for your pets in an emergency. Family Campers and RVers 2011

21 EVACUATION IF THERE IS TIME Inform your "out-of-state" contact of your evacuation plans If you are instructed to do so, shut off water, gas and electricity before leaving. Leave a note telling others when you left and where you are going. Check with neighbors who may need a ride. Family Campers and RVers 2011

22 TURNING OFF UTILITIES WHEN to turn off utilities If there is damage to your home Authorities advise you to turn off your utilities HOW to turn off utilities Locate the electric, gas and water shut-off valves. Keep necessary tools near gas and water shut-off valves. Teach family members how to turn off utilities. If you turn the gas off, a professional must turn it back on. Do not attempt to do this yourself. Family Campers and RVers 2011

23 NEIGHBORHOOD PREPARATION Talk to your neighbors about how you can work together during an emergency. Find out if anyone has specialized equipment like a power generator or expertise such as medical knowledge, that might help in a crisis. Decide who will check on elderly or disabled neighbors. Make back-up plans for children in case you can't get home in an emergency. Family Campers and RVers 2011

24 BECOME EDUCATED Knowing what to do during the initial moments during an emergency is an important part of being prepared and may make all the difference when seconds count. Family Campers and RVers 2011

25 BECOME EDUCATED Some preparations are the same no matter what the emergency making an emergency supply kit developing a family communications plan Family Campers and RVers 2011

26 BECOME EDUCATED However, there are important differences among potential emergencies that will impact the decisions you make and the actions you take. Learn more about the potential emergencies that could happen where you live and the appropriate way to respond to them. Family Campers and RVers 2011

27 BECOME EDUCATED Learn about the emergency plans established in your area by your state and local government. Knowing what to do during an emergency is an important part of being prepared and may make all the difference when seconds count. Consider becoming C.E.R.T. certified. Family Campers and RVers 2011

28 C.E.R.T. CITIZEN’S EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM CERT training teaches skills that people can use to safely help while waiting for responders Family Campers and RVers 2011

29 C.E.R.T. CITIZEN’S EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM If a disaster happens that overwhelms local response capability, CERT members are trained to Give critical support to those in their immediate area until help arrives. Provide useful information to responders and support their effort at the disaster site. Family Campers and RVers 2011

30 C.E.R.T. CITIZEN’S EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM In non-disaster situations, CERT members assist with non-emergency projects that improve the safety of the community. Distribute and/or install smoke alarms Replace smoke alarm batteries in the homes of elderly distribute disaster education material provide services at special events, such as parades, sporting events, concerts etc. Family Campers and RVers 2011

31 C.E.R.T. For further information on this program And how you can find your local training opportunities, Go to Family Campers and RVers 2011

32 When preparation counts: KEEPING IT TOGETHER With all the preparation in place, the “rubber meets the road” when the emergency hits. Survival depends on how you utilize the preparations. In many ways, it depends on Attitude Decisive Action Making Choices Family Campers and RVers 2011

33 LUCK IS UNRELIABLE Victim or Survivor? How you have planned dictates how you proceed. How you proceed is what makes the difference. Think Act Survive Family Campers and RVers 2011

34 EMOTIONAL PHASES OF SURVIVAL After a disaster, the mind goes through several defined phases Impact phase (little or no emotion) Do what you have to do Inventory phase (assess situation, make “functional” relationships.) Rescue Phase (take direction from others or take charge) Recovery phase (There may be a reaction against rescuers) Family Campers and RVers 2011

35 IMPACT PHASE Something has happened. You may not yet know what. All is confusion. You can PANIC Or you can REMAIN CALM Family Campers and RVers 2011

36 Keys to staying calm in a crisis You cannot change what has happened. Looking back has no place in an emergency. There are three keys in taking charge of emotions Preparation Prevents Panic Count on Staying Calm Breathe Deeply Family Campers and RVers 2011

37 COUNT ON STAYING CALM You’ve heard “count to ten” as a means of managing anger The brain functions both emotionally and logically. Both functions can occur at the same time, but one “takes charge.” By COUNTING you are forcing the logical part of the brain to get in gear and are making the emotional part less prominent. Family Campers and RVers 2011

38 COUNT ON STAYING CALM Checklists are a form of counting. So in an emergency setting Pulling out a prepared checklist Guides what needs to be done AND Helps calmness to prevail Family Campers and RVers 2011

39 BREATHE DEEPLY Provides more oxygen to the brain which will reduce Anxiety. “count your breaths” (Get double benefit) Avoid hyperventilation. Family Campers and RVers 2011

40 PRIORITIES Family Campers and RVers 2011 Your first concern after a disaster is your family’s health and safety. You cannot be effective helping others if you are worried about your own.

41 Family Campers and RVers 2011 DO NOT ADD TO THE DISASTER BY BECOMING A VICTIM Protect yourself from injury. Wear Sturdy boots/gloves if available. Keep hydrated. Wash hands thoroughly and often. Be aware of exhaustion. PRIORITIES

42 BECOME A LEADER There is chaos in any emergency. SOMEONE needs to take charge. SOMEONE needs to become the leader. If you are prepared, that SOMEONE could be YOU! Family Campers and RVers 2011

43 BECOME A LEADER Be aware Become familiar with the areas around you. Know evacuation routes and available shelter. Know what type of shelter is needed for specific emergencies Stay Calm Count and Breathe Keep your head in control Do not take foolish chances Family Campers and RVers 2011

44 BECOME A LEADER Be aware of specific needs of those around you. Communicate Listen to suggestions Rely on preparedness of those around you Family Campers and RVers 2011

45 BECOME A LEADER Delegate duties Being involved helps to dispel panic Once you know what needs to be done, communicate specifically Use plain language: keep simple and straightforward Trust others to do their part Family Campers and RVers 2011

46 BECOME A LEADER Control the flow of information Never lie Focus on the facts Keep as informed as possible Limit news exposure to those prone to panic Family Campers and RVers 2011

47 COPING WITH DISASTER Remember that personalities are different React differently to stress fear fatigue Be prepared to deal with human nature. Keep your own emotions in check. Family Campers and RVers 2011

48 COPING WITH DISASTER Emotional toll can exceed the physical toll.  Everyone is affected in some way.  Everyone responds differently  May cause conflicts  “Normal” responses are Sadness Grief Anger Family Campers and RVers 2011

49 COPING WITH DISASTER Family Campers and RVers 2011 WHO IS AT RISK? Anyone directly affected by the disaster. At special risk: children and elderly. Those who have witnessed the disaster. Those sensitive individuals who have been bombarded with media coverage of the disaster.

50 THINK—ACT--SURVIVE Some respond with panic Some respond by shutting down Delay can be fatal, but so can overreaction. Family Campers and RVers 2011

51 COPING WITH DISASTER Family Campers and RVers 2011 Self-injury or Suicide may be a delayed response to crisis.

52 COPING WITH DISASTER AFTER THE ACUTE CRISIS Maintain normal family and daily routine as much as possible Eat healthy, rest, exercise, meditate Participate in memorials (“closure”) Talk with someone about your feelings Seek help from professional crisis counselors, support groups Be realistic (don’t blame yourself or feel frustrated because you can’t “do more”.) Family Campers and RVers 2011

53 HELPING OTHERS COMPASSION IS ONE WAY OF COPING. Family Campers and RVers 2011

54 Guidelines on Giving VOLUNTEER Check with local organizations or Listen to local new reports for information on Where help is needed What kind of help is needed UNTIL VOLUNTEERS ARE SPECIFICALLY REQUESTED, stay away from disaster areas. Family Campers and RVers 2011

55 Guidelines on Giving SUPPLIES Bring your own food, water and emergency supplies to a disaster area if you are needed there. Don’t expect these supplies to be provided for you, especially if a large area has been affected. Family Campers and RVers 2011

56 Guidelines on Giving Give only to recognized disaster relief organizations. These organizations are prepared to process checks, purchase what is needed and get it to the people who need it most. Do not give to door-to-door con artists who claim to be part of a major disaster fund-raising organization Family Campers and RVers 2011

57 Guidelines on Giving Do not drop off food, clothing or other items to a government agency or disaster relief organization unless specifically requested. These agencies do not have the resources to sort through donated items Family Campers and RVers 2011

58 Guidelines on Giving If donating items such as non-perishable food,  Donate a quantity of a given item rather than a mix of different items.  Determine where your donation is going, how it will get there, who will unload it, how it will be distributed. WITHOUT SUFFICIENT PLANNING, MUCH NEEDED SUPPLIES WILL BE LEFT UNUSED. Family Campers and RVers 2011

59 SUMMARY The best way to survive a disaster is to prepare for disaster. Preparation allows you to cope with the immediate situation before professional help arrives. Coping with the aftermath of disaster may be as difficult as coping with the disaster itself. Helping others should be done with planning as well so that it doesn’t increase risk or interfere with recovery efforts. Disasters bring out both the best and the worst of society: beware of scam artists. Family Campers and RVers 2011

60 Serenity prayer Change what I can Accept what I cannot Know the difference Family Campers and RVers 2011


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