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Yukon-Koyukuk School District Kerry Boyd, Superintendent August 12 th, 2013.

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Presentation on theme: "Yukon-Koyukuk School District Kerry Boyd, Superintendent August 12 th, 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 Yukon-Koyukuk School District Kerry Boyd, Superintendent August 12 th, 2013

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3 In June 2013, the State Board adopted a new accountability system for our public schools. ASPI AYP

4  Accountability For Educators 2012 NEW educator evaluation regulations for teachers and administrators For District and Schools 2013 NEW accountability regulations to replace Adequate Yearly Progress system of No Child Left Behind Alaska School Annual Measurable Performance Index Objectives (ASPI) (AMOs) Preparing College, Career & Culturally Ready Graduates

5 Overview of Accountability Components ASPI Alaska School Performance Index New Standards New Teacher Evaluation New Assessment-Smarter Balance New Early Literacy Screening Requirements

6 School designations are based on indicators calculated using data from the school year. Two designations will be assigned to each school: ASPI score ASPI rating ASPI score ASPI rating

7 School designations are based on indicators calculated using data from the school year. Accountability System based on two Prongs: Alaska School Performance Index (ASPI) and Annual Measureable Objective Targets Accountability System based on two Prongs: Alaska School Performance Index (ASPI) and Annual Measureable Objective Targets

8 Schools receive a score based on performance on state assessments in reading, writing and math; school progress on state assessments, attendance rates, and, for schools with high school, graduation rates, scores on college and career readiness indicators such as ACT,SAT and WorkKeys, and participation rates on WorkKeys assessment.

9 Components of ASPI Graduation Rate Collage and career ready indicators: o Academic achievement (all schools) o School progress (all schools) o Attendance rate (all schools) o Graduation rate (schools with 12 th grade) o WorkKeys/ACT/SAT scores (12 th graders) o WorkKeys participation rate (11 th graders) Indicators weighed based on grade spans (K-8 and 9-12) Total points based on 100 point scale

10 Factors For K-8 Performance Count Proficient – Number of students who were proficient in reading, writing and math. Percent Proficient Achievement Score School Progress – Reviews test scores over two consecutive years to see growth

11 Appendix A: School Progress Alaska Native/American Indian Low Income Students with Disabilities English Language Learners * A subgroup must have a minimum of 5 students assessed in one or more subjects in order to be considered. An index score is developed for the all students group and up to 4 subgroups:

12 Index scores are weighed as follow: No eligible subgroups: All students = 100% or score One eligible subgroups: All students = 90% of score Two eligible subgroups: All students = 80% of score Three eligible subgroups: All students = 70% of score Four eligible subgroups: All students = 60% of score

13 Student performance is divided into 7 proficiency level categories. Prior Year Level Current Year Level FBP-FBP+BP-BP+ProPro+Adv FBP FBP BP BP Pro Pro Adv

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15 Priority Schools Priority schools identified as the 1-2 star schools for most rigorous support At least 5% of the lowest performing Title 1 schools in state Must remain as designated Priority School for three years Must develop and implement a plan to include the seven turnaround principles as per 4AAC

16 Priority Schools Priority schools identified as the 1-2 star schools for most rigorous support At least 5% of the lowest performing Title 1 schools in state Must remain as designated Priority School for three years Must develop and implement a plan to include the seven turnaround principles as per 4AAC

17 Focus Schools Focus schools identified as 1 or 2 star schools At least 10% of the lowest performing Title 1 schools in state Must remain as designated Priority School for two years Must develop and implement a school improvement plan to target specific needs, including consideration of the seven turnaround principals as per 4AAC

18 Improvement Plans Schools identified as 1 or 2 star schools Must submit plan for DEED approval Alaska STEPP- Steps Toward Educational Progress and Partnership All Schools in YKSD must submit abbreviated version of STEPP version School Improvement plans due Oct 15

19 Reward Schools Schools identified as top 10% of the highest performing and high-progress schools in the state Schools will be given special recognition and encouraged to serve as model schools

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21 How are districts categorized? Tier 1 Less than 25% of schools are 1-2 stars Tier 2 Districts with 25%-49.99% of schools are 1 star & 2 star or 25% to 49.99% of students attend a 1 star or two star school Tier 3 Districts with 50% or more of schools are 1 star & 2 star, or 50% or more students attend a 1-2 star school

22  Support School  Priority Schools – comprehensive attention & support  Focus – targeted improvement support  Reward – special recognition Districts  Tier Ⅲ – most access to resources & support  Tier Ⅱ – increased access to resources & support  Tier I– general access to resources & support Preparing College, Career & Culturally Ready Graduates

23  Standards NEW – 2012 English Language Arts Mathematics Content Standards Science Geography Government & Citizenship History Skills for a healthy Life Arts World Languages Technology Employability Library/Information Literacy Cultural Standards

24 June 2012 New Alaska English/Languag e Arts and Mathematics Standards adopted SY Awareness Campaign Transition Tools Field test item types SY Alignment of curriculum to new standards Begin implementation of new standards SY New assessments in place New baseline to inform continued implementation Alaska Standards Timeline SY Continue implementing the standards while refining instructional practices

25 Preparing College, Career & Culturally Ready Graduates  Assessment Spring 2015  NEW English language Arts & Mathematics Standard assessed for the first time  New baseline to inform continues implementation of new standards

26 New English Language and Math Standards  Alaska did not adopt the Common Core State Standards  Adopting states had to agree to accept the standards in their entirety and not change them  New Standards are more rigorous

27 Smarter Balanced Consortium & New Alaska Assessments What is the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium? Smarter Balanced is a state-led consortium working collaboratively to develop next-generation assessments that accurately measure student progress toward college and career readiness. When will the new assessments be in place? Students will take the new assessments in spring 2015.

28 Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium Alaska schools will administer the summative assessment at the end of the year during a testing window of 3~4 weeks. Grades 3-11 will participate in the computer-adaptive summative assessment and the performance tasks in math and English language arts. These tests are untimed. The estimated amount of time to complete the summative assessment for both English language arts and math will be:  7 hours in grades 3-5  7.5 hours in grades 6-8  8.5 hours in grades 9-11  System Components

29 FAQ - Smarter Balanced Consortium & New Alaska Assessments How is Smarter Balanced different from current assessment? The Smarter Balanced assessments are aligned to the Alaska English Language Arts and Mathematics standards that Alaska adopted in What is a computer adaptive test? Based on student responses, the computer program adjusts the difficulty of questions throughout the assessment. For example, a student who answers a question correctly will receive a more challenging item, while an incorrect answer generates an easier question.

30 Smarter Balanced Assessment Grades 3-11 Online adaptive, like MAPS Practice tests available - grades 3-8 and 11 th grade Math and English language arts. Alaska expects a significant drop in the percentage of proficient students

31 Early Literacy Screening Requirement 2013/2014 and Beyond As a part of a comprehensive system of student assessments, districts are to administer an approved early literacy screen Accurately identify students experiencing delays in attaining early literacy skills Be individually administered Have an administration format that permits testing not less than three times per school year

32 Early Literacy Screening Fact Who is assessed?  ALL students in Kindergarten, first and second grades.  Third grade students identified as experiencing delays How often must the screening assessment be given? The screening assessment must be administered to ALL kindergarten, first and second graders at least once annually between April 1 and May 30.

33 Early Literacy Screening Fact How are data reported? Districts will submit data to the department data once annually by July 15. How are data shared? Data will be shared with parents  Not less than once annually for all tested students  Twice annually for students identified as experiencing delays

34 Early Literacy Screening Requirement 2013/2014 and Beyond What will YKSD use to screen? MAPS No more Aimsweb How are the assessments funded? Districts’ projected allocation will be $7.74 per student based on the 2012 student count period enrollment all kindergarten, first, and second grade students 50% of third grade students

35 Educator Evaluation Teacher and Principal Evaluation November and February Current Evaluation Tool on YKSD website Evaluation Tool to be revised using a committee of teachers and administrators

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37 Overall Rating & Student Learning Data A district will evaluate whether an educator’s overall performance is exemplary, proficient, basic, or unsatisfactory. A district shall include student learning data in teacher and administrator’s overall rating according to the following schedule: o SY 2015 ‐ 16 & SY 2016 ‐ 17, at least 20% o SY 2017 ‐ 18 at least 35% o SY 2018 ‐ 19 and after, at least 50% A district may not give an educator an overall performance rating of proficient or higher if the educator has been evaluated to be performing at a level of basic or lower on one or more of the content standards or other criteria for which evaluation is required.

38 Levels of Performance Standards Performance Levels EPBU Understanding Student Needs Differentiation Content Knowledge & Instruction Assessment Learning Environment Family & Community Professional Practice Student Learning Performance Rating on each of the 8 standards.  Unsatisfactory (U)  Basic (B)  Proficient (P)  Exemplary (E)

39 Overall Rating District Reporting School Year & School Year Student Learning Standards Alaska Teacher Standards Student Learning Standard 20% Student Learning Standard  Exemplary  Proficient  Basic  Unsatisfactory Content Standard 80% Alaska Teacher Standards Student Learning Standards Exemplary Proficient Basic Unsatisfactory Proficient or higher on all standards Basic or Unsatisfa ctory on any one standard Professional Practice Learning Environment Assessment Family & Community Understanding Student Needs Content Knowledge & Instruction Differentiation Cultural Standards Rating on each of the 7 Content Standards.  Exemplary  Proficient  Basic  Unsatisfactory

40 Results versus Reporting Evaluation Results Leads to professional learning, district support and or plan of improvement Confidential-between administrator (s) and individual being evaluated District Reporting Evaluator evaluations provide the information the district will use to calculate the overall rating Number and percentage of educators at each overall rating reported to AKDEED by each school district in July 2016 Information available to public

41 What are the three most important things you learned today about Alaska’s new requirements? What are two questions you have regarding what you just heard?

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