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3 – Professional Ethics: USOC Coaching Code of Ethics

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1 3 – Professional Ethics: USOC Coaching Code of Ethics
USOC Code of Ethics Competence Integrity Professional Responsibility Respect for Participants and Dignity Concern for Others’ Welfare Responsible Coaching General Principles Include: SLIDE #64 - Corresponds to page of 2015 Manual. Refer audience to Manual pages to read in detail about the COE document put together by USOC-USAV-AVCA. The pie sections are timed in. Discussion/Comments: Again for this whole section, let them read the slide content as you choose a couple to talk about in a little more detail and ask for examples. Do not just read the slides!! Refer them to the whole document in the Manual for more details…they can read it themselves. Manual Page 31-41 Slide #64

2 3 – Professional Ethics: USOC Coaching Code of Ethics
Standards for all NGB’s Concerning: Advertising and Other Public Statements Training Athletes Training Supervision Resolving Ethical Issues Familiarity with Ethics Code Confronting Ethical Issues Conflicts Between Ethics & Organizational Demands Informal & Formal Resolution of Ethical Violations SLIDE #65- Corresponds to page of 2015 Manual. All bullets are timed to appear- first group (Training Supervision) will disappear and second group (Resolving Ethical Issues) will replace it. Discussion/Comments: Give brief explanations on 1 or 2 – Specifically talk about reporting colleagues for unethical behavior….. Reporting someone is actually the ETHICAL thing to do – if you know someone is acting improperly and you do not do anything about it, then YOU are a PART of the unethical situation. That is why so many “bad apples” just get passed along to a new club or new team…..”Whew, they are not my concern anymore…” General Standards Address: Applicability of the Ethics Code & Boundaries of Competence Maintaining Expertise & Basis for Professional Judgments Multiple & Exploitative Relationships Consultations /Referrals, Delegation to/Supervision of Subordinates Fees / Financial Arrangements Describing the Nature and Results of Services Respecting Others, Non-discrimination, Sexual & Other Harassment, Personal Problems/Conflicts Avoiding Harm, Misuse of Coaches’ Influence Advertising and Other Public Statements Avoidance of false or deceptive statements Statements by others Media presentations Testimonials Recruiting Training Athletes - Standards Concerning: Structuring the Relationship & Conflict of Interest Sexual relationships – current/former athletes Drug-free Sport - Alcohol & Other Drug Use Interruption/Termination of Professional Relationships Training Supervision - Standards Concerning: Design and Descriptions of Training Programs Accuracy and Objectivity in Coaching Assessing Athlete Performance Honoring Commitments Resolving Ethical Issues-Standards Concerning: Familiarity with Ethics Code Confronting Ethical Issues Conflicts Between Ethics & Organizational Demands Informal & Formal Resolution of Ethical Violations Reporting Colleagues … Ethical?! Reporting Ethical Violations & Process Improper Complaints Manual Page 35-39 Slide #65

3 3 – Professional Ethics: USAV/USOC Coaching Code of Ethics
Next Evolution of USAV COE (in 1999): USA Volleyball adopted a more volleyball-specific COE including standards of behavior for the following groups. USAV Codes of Behavior suggested for: Athletes Parents Sports Medicine Support Team Spectators Officiating Team Administrators Business Relationships Media Sponsors SLIDE #66 - Corresponds to page of 2015 Manual. The bullets are timed to appear. Video File: pin_hi.mpeg. OPTIONAL Video clip to show if available is Hockey Canada & USA Hockey’s “Pin the Tail” illustrating some bad behavior, this time on the part of a PARENT – which you may want to start this slide off with. Length is 30 seconds. Discussion/Comments: may want to elaborate BRIEFLY on why Codes of Behavior for these groups are important. Suggest they can share these with their athletes and with Parents and others associated with their programs….along with some of the Resource Articles from this Chapter as well as from Chapter 6 (Parents) on the IMPACT Resource Page. Manual Page 40-43 Slide #66

4 3 – Professional Ethics: USAV Jr Club Personnel Code of Ethics
NATIONAL CODE OF ETHICS FOR JR CLUB PERSONNEL! Duty and Obligation of USAV affiliated Junior Club Program administrators, directors, coaches & other club personnel to assure the Code of Ethics is followed & adhered to by all non-player individuals. Uniform Nationwide Code of Ethics for all USAV members, regardless of Region. Personnel includes but is not limited to: Club Directors & Administrators, Head & Assistant Coaches, Trainers, Managers, Chaperones, Team Reps/Parents, etc. (excludes Jr. players). Head or Assistant Coach affiliated with a Jr. program must also be: An adult (see Region definition of an adult), and IMPACT certified & BGS’d according to USAV/Region policies. Responsibilities include: Head Coach or qualified personnel must be present at practices/competitions. Head coach, adult club rep or registered chaperone must be present during team travel. Coaches & Club personnel must understand the unique power of a coach-athlete relationship, shall not exploit athletes & shall avoid relationships that compromise integrity of learning/participation process, impair professional judgment and/or take advantage of situations for own personal gain/gratification. Photo Courtesy of John Kessel SLIDE #67 - Corresponds to page of 2015 Manual. The bullets are timed to appear. Discussion/Comments: Came about in a continuing effort to promote safe, healthy and ethical communication, relationships and treatment of all USA Volleyball players and personnel; all adults associated with a junior club program now must read, accept and submit this USAV Junior Club Personnel Code of Ethics before they are eligible to actively participate in a junior club program associated, affiliated, or participating in USA Volleyball. Refer them to the FULL & ENTIRE document in their manual! Remind them that this will be in effect THIS SEASON! Manual Page 44-45 Slide #67

5 3 – Professional Ethics: USAV Jr Club Personnel Code of Ethics
NATIONAL CODE OF ETHICS FOR JR CLUB PERSONNEL – cont. Any violation of JCP Code may result in sanctions being issued against club rep, individual(s) & club/team involved. Sanctions may extend to loss of eligibility of any involved. RVA’s may require JCP Code to be acknowledged/collected each season, but if not seasonally, the signed Code of Ethics must be kept on file for reference. Any coach wishing to become CAP certified will ALSO need to accept/acknowledge and submit the existing full USOC/USAV Coaches Code of Conduct for certification. All Club Personnel: Must understand that all forms of sexual abuse/assault/harassment of a current or former athlete are unethical and illegal Shall insure all individuals have met RVA & USAV membership requirements prior to participation Must inform players and parent(s)/guardian(s) about ReVA and/or USAV Transfer and Regional Recruiting Policies May not participate in, require another individual to participate in, or condone any act considered to be illegal Shall strive to educate athletes & personnel to respect/honor/adhere to facility rules Shall ensure that activities are suitable for age/experience/ability of their athletes SLIDE #68 - Corresponds to page of 2015 Manual. The bullets are timed to appear. Discussion/Comments: elaborate on one or two points and remind them that any coach wishing to become CAP certified will ALSO need to accept/acknowledge and submit the existing full USOC/USAV Coaches Code of Conduct for certification. Again, Refer them to the FULL & ENTIRE document in their manual! Remind them that this will be in effect THIS SEASON! Manual Page 44-45 Slide #68

6 3 – Professional Ethics: USAV Jr Club Personnel Code of Ethics
NATIONAL CODE OF ETHICS FOR JR CLUB PERSONNEL – cont. All Club Personnel Shall: Seek professional medical advice when making decisions regarding an injured athlete's ability to continue training/playing While in a professional capacity, avoid drug/tobacco/alcohol use in presence of athletes (and any time while in charge of supervising of athletes). Not supply/condone use of drugs/alcohol/tobacco, fireworks or any item/material that can be used as a weapon, to any participants/athletes & shall report athletes using or in possession of same. Not allow/encourage/condone/require behavior that threatens an athlete’s amateur status or RVA/USA Volleyball/School/Collegiate eligibility. Maintain relationships with club personnel on a professional/confidential basis. Act as positive role models - includes being courteous/respectful/polite to players/parents, other coaches/club directors/event personnel/officials. Not engage in physical/verbal/emotional harassment, abusive words/actions, or coercion of current/former athletes. Immediately report suspected illegal activity, abuse/assault, harassment or other ethical violations of this Junior Club Personnel Code of Ethics to appropriate authorities, including Club and RVA administrators. SLIDE #69 - Corresponds to page of 2015 Manual. The bullets are timed to appear. Discussion/Comments: elaborate on one or two points – especially the LAST bullet! Remind coaches that though they may not be legally obligated to report violations, they are now ETHICALLY obligated to do so! To ignore, or look away from a situation makes you a part of the problem! You may want to share the “USAV Statement Regarding Youth Membership Protection Safeguards” found in your online materials or on the Health & Safety portion of the Education page of the national USAV website. Again Refer them to the FULL & ENTIRE document in their Manual or from their Region Office! Remind them that this will be in effect THIS SEASON! Manual Page 44-45 Slide #69

7 3 – Professional Ethics: Chapter Review
POLL QUESTION #6 To Review: Following the appropriate Jr. Club Personnel Code of Ethics will help protect both coaches and athletes Act with Integrity, Respect and Concern for others’ welfare Apply the “TV Test” Would you want your actions broadcast on TV (or onYouTube or Facebook) for everyone to observe…. would people think it is OK?! Developing & then using your Functional Coaching Philosophy as your coaching guide – on to Chapter 4! Slide #70: Discussion/Comments: Review Key points from this Chapter before moving on to Chapter 4 – Coaching Philosophy. The first three bullets are timed and then the “Apply the TV Test” will grow and then the last bullet will follow. Ask for some examples that have been actually caught on TV… The transition bullet is timed 5 sec after the last bullet. Refer them to the Additional resources on page 44 of their Manual. MAY ASK A REVIEW POLL QUESTION CONCERNING COE HERE: Which of the following would be considered UNETHICAL behavior according to the USAV Junior Club Personnel Code of Ethics? (Only one that in NOT “UNETHICAL” is reporting a colleague….that is what you SHOULD DO! [CHAPTER 3- SLIDE #49] Acting in manner not in the best interests of your athletes Sexual relationship w/current or former athlete (w/in 2 yr rule) Inflating your qualifications on your coaching resume Reporting ethical violations by a colleague Asking a current player to provide a testimonial for you Slide #70

8 MY Coaching Philosophy?!” “What is 4 – Coaching Philosophy
(… and what do you mean by “functional”?!) Take a moment to write a brief philosophy in your Manual (pg 47) SLIDE #71 - Corresponds to page 47 of 2015 Manual Pause for 1-2 minutes & have participants write their initial thoughts for the beginning of a personal Mission Statement & Coaching Philosophy in their Manual on page 45. Discussion/Comments: Then take a minute or two & ask for some volunteers to state one thing from their list & ask if others have that one…etc. Manual Page 47 Slide #71

9 What DO You Coach?! A QUICK Question! 4 – Coaching Philosophy
(If your first response was… “I coach Volleyball” Then you have just FAILED this IMPACT Clinic!) Just kidding … … the important thing to realize is that we coach PEOPLE! Photo by Bill Kaufmann SLIDE #72 - Corresponds to page 47 of 2015 Manual Click to this slide after they write down their philosophy start & have discussed a few volunteers’ thoughts & have participants quickly think/write their initial answer to this question. The Question will stay on screen & continue to blink until you click and bring up the “If your first response was…”, then all rest is timed to appear. Discussion/Comments: Then reiterate that we are coaching PEOPLE not volleyballs & need to keep that in mind as we talk about developing a coaching philosophy. Manual Page 47 Slide #72

10 4 – Coaching Philosophy: University of Oklahoma Study
POLL QUESTION #7 Top 4 Role Models for Students PARENTS Teachers Siblings Classmates SLIDE #73 - Corresponds to page 48 of 2015 Manual. Discussion/Comments: ASK students to quickly jot down their top 4 answers in any order. Then click the slide & the First click will bring in #4, followed by timed appearance of #3, then #2 and finally #1. Ask how many had them all & in the correct order. Do the same with the next slide on role models for ATHLETES…OR ask a POLL QUESTION here before clicking to the next slide to reveal the answers: Which group did ATHLETES choose as their number 1 Role Model? [CHAPTER 4- SLIDE #52] Siblings Parents Coaches Teachers Classmates Manual Page 48 Slide #73

11 4 – Coaching Philosophy: University of Oklahoma Study
Top 4 Role Models for Athletes 1. Parents 2. COACHES 3. Teachers 4. Siblings Note: 35% of athletes placed their COACH AHEAD of their parents SLIDE #74 - Corresponds to page 48 of 2015 Manual. Discussion/Comments: If you didn’t use the POLL Question on the previous slide, can ASK students to quickly jot down their top 4 answers in any order. Then click the slide & the First click will bring in #4, followed by timed appearance of #3, then #1 and finally #2. Ask how many had them all & in the correct order. The 35% stat is timed to appear after answer #2. Photo Courtesy of FIVB Manual Page 48 Slide #74

12 4 – Coaching Philosophy: Michigan State University
POLL QUESTION #8 75% of today’s teenagers quit organized athletics by the age of 15 … WHY?! “I was not having fun. The coach was a poor teacher” “I lost interest SLIDE #75 - Corresponds to page 48 of 2015 Manual. “75%” will automatically come up, followed by “Why”. Discussion/Comments: Ask for a couple of volunteers to guess what the #1 reason was, and then poll the rest of the audience for agreement. OR can ask a whole group POLL QUESTION here before revealing the answers: What did kids list as their number 1 reason for quitting sports? [CHAPTER 4- SLIDE #54] We weren't winning enough The coach was a poor teacher It was too expensive I wasn't having fun I lost interest Then click on the slide once & the 3 answers will slowly fade in. Point out that ALL 3 are inter-related: I wasn’t having fun BECAUSE the coach was a poor teacher, or I lost interest BECAUSE I wasn’t having fun…. Manual Page 48 Slide #75

13 4 – Coaching Philosophy: New Research
In a study published in the Journal of Applied Sport Psychology indicates that kids find playing for coaches who stress personal improvement, having fun and giving maximum effort is much more important with a bigger impact on them than a team's win-loss record. Results showed that: A MASTERY CLIMATE was about 10 x’s more influential than the team's WON-LOSS RECORD Boys/Girls perceiving that their coach created a MASTERY CLIMATE: Liked playing for their coach more. Rated their coaches as more knowledgeable about the sport. Thought their coach was better at teaching kids how to play. Had a greater desire to play for the coach again the following year. Enjoyed their team experience more. Believed that their parents liked the coach more. This was true equally for girls & boys, and found that winning was relatively unimportant when it comes to youth sports. SLIDE #76- Corresponds to page of 2015 Manual. Discussion/Comments: This is new stuff & though not into the Manual for 2010 it does relate to page 46 of 2010 Manual. You can read the article online on the IMPACT Resources page of the website. NOTE- THIS IS A NEWER STUDY…. Motivational coaching climate outscores winning for young athletes: New research indicates that young athletes find playing for coaches who stress personal improvement, having fun and giving maximum effort is far more important and has a bigger impact on them than a team's won-loss record. Co-authors of the paper are Sean Cumming, a former UW postdoctoral researcher who is now a lecturer in sport and exercise psychology at the University of Bath in England, and Joel Grossbard, a UW psychology doctoral student. The William T. Grant Foundation funded the research. "In terms of athletes' ratings of how much fun they had and how much they liked playing for their coach, our results showed that a mastery climate was about 10 times more influential than was the team's won-loss record," said Ronald Smith, a University of Washington sport psychologist and co-author of a study published in the current issue of the Journal of Applied Sport Psychology. Boys and girls who perceived that their coach created a mastery climate: -liked playing for their coach more. -rated their coaches as more knowledgeable about the sport. -thought their coach was better at teaching kids how to play basketball. -had a greater desire to play for the coach again the following year. -enjoyed their team experience more. -believed that their parents liked the coach more. Smoll noted that the results held up equally for girls and boys and that winning was relatively unimportant when it comes to youth sports. Manual Page 48-49 Slide #76

14 4 – Coaching Philosophy: The IMPACT of Coaches
I have come to the frightening conclusion that I am the decisive element on the court. It is my personal approach that creates the climate. It is my daily mood that makes the weather. As a coach, I possess tremendous power to make a child’s life miserable or joyous. I can humiliate or humor, hurt or heal. In all situations it is my response that decides whether a crisis will be escalated or de-escalated and a child humanized or dehumanized. ~ an adaptation from Haim Ginott ~ SLIDE #77- Corresponds to page 48 of 2015 Manual. All text appears with the slide. Discussion/Comments: Let audience read this as you paraphrase & elaborate on one or two statements…. HOW is our mood creating the “weather “ in our gyms/practices?! MIGHT WANT TO REPLAY THE DRAMATIZATION VIDEO PIECE HERE IF NOT USED TO OPEN THE CLINIC [link to video on USAV website is Manual Page 48 Slide #77

15 4 – Coaching Philosophy: Characteristics of Successful Coaches
Committed to individual integrity, values and personal growth See themselves as educators Well-educated Long Run Commitment Willing to experiment with new ideas Value the coach-player relationship Understand and appreciate human nature Love their sport and work Honest and strong in nature Human and therefore imperfect Photo Courtesy of FIVB SLIDE #78 - Corresponds to page 48 of 2015 Manual. First 3 bullets appear on slide, next 2 sets of 3 are timed to appear (3 secs). Discussion/Comments: Comment on one or two out of each set. Can then ask audience for a couple of other examples/traits before going to next slide where more are listed… Manual Page 48 Slide #78

16 4 – Coaching Philosophy: MORE Characteristics of Successful Coaches
Have Patience Value Process and Performance over Outcome Help Every Player in the program Separate Performance from Performer Are Consistent Are Demanding & Disciplined, not demeaning Coach Smarter not harder Are Innovative, not imitative SLIDE #79- Corresponds to page of 2015 Manual. Each bullet will crawl in from bottom (1 sec delay). Discussion/Comments: Explain that many of these Characteristics came from past Olympians asked to identify characteristics/traits of their coaches… Discuss 2-3 and move on. Manual Page 50-51 Slide #79

17 4 – Coaching Philosophy: Fundamental Coaching Principles
Quality over Quantity No Fear of mistakes: Positive vs. Negative Errors Regression to the Mean Athletes will be Better Players – if they COACH Limit Physical Punishment No “trying”: Do or Do Not, There is No Try (Master Jedi Yoda) Be non-verbally positive Be a good role model Utilize “Teachable Moment” Cooperation/Competition & Self Discipline Coach Democratically/Socratically Photo by Bill Kauffman SLIDE #80 - Corresponds to page of 2015 Manual. The bulleted principles will fly in 3 at a time on click. The last one flies in alone. Discussion/Comments: Discuss 1-2 from each group of bullets & be sure to elaborate on the very last one – ask coaches… “What does ‘coaching democratically’ mean? Then, what does ‘coaching Socratically’ mean?!” Democratically = involve athletes in decision making for team Socratically = teach by ASKING QUESTIONS….not merely giving them the answers… let them arrive at own answers (Eureka! Moments) Manual Page 51-54 Slide #80

18 4 – Coaching Philosophy: MORE Fundamental Coaching Principles
Eye Focus & Timing, not just Technique or Physical Errors Constructive Sandwich Coach PROactively, not Reactively Eliminate Dead Time Practice What You Preach Avoid Sarcasm – Shout Praise, Whisper Criticism Teach Observation Through the Net Use Positive Charting Make things Game-like Use Proper Skills in Drills SLIDE #81 - Corresponds to page of 2015 Manual. Bullets are timed to appear three or four at a time. Discussion/Comments: Let the students read the list/group, but Discuss/give an example for only 1-2 principles in each set of bullets…. Or ask the group to provide an example… Manual Page 55-58 Slide #81

19 4 – Coaching Philosophy: A Look at Winning
Builds Confidence Increases in Importance as Kids get Older Increases Motivation More Appropriate with Broader Definitions Winners Handle Failure Better Does NOT Ensure Performance Quality Relative to Whom You Play Gains One Access to Rewards & Privileges It’s HOW You Win, not Whether You Win Photos Courtesy of FIVB SLIDE #82 - Corresponds to page of 2015 Manual. Bullets are broken into sets of three and they are timed to appear. Discussion/Comments: Discuss only 1-2 per group of bullets and then play the video if available & discuss how “winning” is all relative to how you define it. OPTIONAL Video File: You WIN the Silver.mpg is appropriate to show here if you have a copy & time allows (Length: 30 secs); “Win the Silver” Video provided with permission from the US Olympic Committee. Manual Page 61-63 Slide #82

20 4 – Coaching Philosophy: The Competitive Cauldron
What IS it?! Philosophy of Training Popularized by Anson Dorrance, UNC Women’s Soccer Coach What does it MEAN?! Competition is a Key to Developing Players Keep Score to Track Each Player’s Progress Every Practice and Competition Everything They Do (or Some…) What does it DO?! Trains Players to COMPETE in Practice! Makes every ball contact IMPORTANT! HOW do I do it with my team?! Everything in Practice is Recorded, Scored, Ranked & Posted (or Recorded for Coach’s/Individual’s Eyes) Example: Linear Ranking Tournaments Photo by John Kessel SLIDE #83 - Corresponds to page of 2015 Manual. This slide starts with the red topic bullets already in. The subtopic white bullets will need to be clicked in. Discussion/Comments: This is fairly new content to the Manual (in 2007), so familiarize yourself with this content before teaching. Info on Linear ranking Tournaments can be found at or on the IMPACT Resource page of the web site. Give an example of how a basic drill (example - for info gathering on Passers) could be charted or stat-ed for points in a practice, or over the week or over a season etc. Explain that you don’t need a staff to record…players can self report of self score on a wall chart or whiteboard for the day or the week…. You transfer to your clipboard/computer from that. And that not everything needs to be posted publicly (as Dorrance does) – guys tend to like it, many girls do not…..so you can be selective in what is posted/when. Manual Page 63-64 Slide #83

21 4 – Coaching Philosophy: Gender Matters – What Coaches Need to Know
This material was created, developed, and presented by Kathy DeBoer and is included in this USA Volleyball IMPACT Manual with her permission. Do not replicate, edit, or distribute without acknowledgement and express consent. To Train the COMPLETE ATHLETE coaches must teach them to … “Practice Like a Girl and Compete Like a Boy” One reality for coaches is that male and female athletes are different – not only in how they perform, but in how they process information, receive coaching, and interact with others. Female athletes view the world through the lens of Connection; Male athletes view the world through the lens of Opposition, differences which impact their views of teamwork, chemistry, competitiveness, motivation, leadership, feedback, and criticism. Coaches that understand these differences and adjust coaching approaches based on this knowledge will succeed more consistently in motivating and training their teams. Generalizations about gendered behavior are just that patterns that aren’t universal, yet are prominent enough to be associated with one gender or the other. Know the generalities (the Bell Curve) but be aware of athletes who don’t fit the stereotypes and coach them accordingly. SLIDE #84- Corresponds to page of 2015 Manual. Discussion/Comments: familiarize yourself with this section before teaching. When the first slogan (Practice like a girl….”) appears, pause & ask for audience opinions on what that statement might mean to them…. Then click on the slide and the explanations are timed to appear. Give participants enough time to read each paragraph, then you can elaborate on the information or answer a question before moving on to the next slide. Be SURE to point out that this information is BASED ON GENERALIZATIONS or stereotypical behavior by gender….but is based/proven on science/studies…not just opinions. MOST athletes will fit into this portion of the “Bell Curve” of behaviors….and you will encounter some that do NOT (maybe even YOU do not). Anyone that has coached both genders will understand there ARE differences – even former USA Men’s & Women’s National Team Coach Hugh McCutcheon says this – but that does not mean that both genders cannot accomplish the same ends. Manual Page 64-68 Slide #84

22 4 – Coaching Philosophy: Gender Matters – What Coaches Need to Know
Karch and ‘Susan’ The following story, paraphrased from the book Gender and Competition: How Men and Women Approach Work & Play Differently, is the genesis for the book by Kathy DeBoer A male collegiate coach recounted a memory from his days as assistant coach for the USA Men’s National Team. At the time, the coach felt that a timeout and resulting effort by a key player were a stroke of masterful motivational coaching, and filed it away for future reference. USA was playing important match against Russia & was poised to upset them Late in 5th game Head Coach called last timeout & made adjustments. Coach turned to the team’s best player, a fellow named Karch, & said challengingly, “It’s time for you to step it up. You’re our best player; you’re one of the best players in the world – show that NOW! Win this thing for us.” Several years later this same coach was in a similar situation with his women’s collegiate team. They had a chance to beat a perennial power & the scene was the same - 5th game, close score, last time-out. Recalling the effectiveness of the previous exchange, the Coach turned to his best player in the middle of the huddle … And repeated words of his mentor: “Susan, it’s time for you to step it up. You’re our best player. Tonight, you can prove you’re one of the best players in the country. Win this thing for us - NOW!” SLIDE #85 - Corresponds to page of 2015 Manual. Each of the paragraphs are timed to appear. Discussion/Comments: Let the coaches read all of paragraphs on screen (YOU don’t need to!) - while you paraphrase this portion. Tell them the whole story is in their Manual. Then ask for a couple of volunteers to predict what they think happened in each situation… and then click to the next slide. Manual Page 65-66 Slide #85

23 4 – Coaching Philosophy: Gender Matters – What Coaches Need to Know
THE RESULTS OF THOSE TIMEOUTS?! Karch set his jaw, looked the coach in the eye and nodded. The team cheered loudly, took the court again, and Karch proceeded to take charge of the match, playing with incredible aggressiveness, assuredness and energy which invigorated his team. TEAM USA WON THAT MATCH. Susan looked away, paled slightly, then looked at the floor and said through clenched teeth, “You don’t have to put this all on me.” Everyone else on the team looked uneasy & had physically moved away from each other. Susan, still looking away, just said, “Come on, let’s just play.” The team managed a weak cheer and silently returned to the court. Susan’s play after the timeout was tentative & error-filled. She shanked a pass on serve receive and hit a ball out of bounds. On match point, her team failed to communicate and let a “free ball” land on the floor between two players. Point, Game, and Match! Not only did they not win, they never competed after the timeout. SLIDE #86 - Corresponds to page of 2015 Manual. Discussion/Comments: After having asked students what they think happened in the first scenario, CLICK ON the KARCH paragraph to get it to appear, followed by the timed result of that match. Then, ask again what they think happened with SUSAN, then click to get her paragraph to appear, followed by the timed appearance of her result. You can ask your audience “Who would have Reacted Like Karch & Who Like Susan?! Many times the females in the room will say “Like Karch”….this may be because they have played at a high level of competition, and competed more like male athletes….there is a Bell Curve in play here….MOST female athletes would react closer to what Susan did, but there are those who would be more toward the “Karch” end of the scale (and vice versa for the male athletes)… So even Female Coaches need to understand that not ALL the athletes they work with will be as “competitive” as the coach is/was… Manual Page 65-66 Slide #86

24 4 – Coaching Philosophy: Gender Matters – What Coaches Need to Know
WHY?! Their Perspectives were very different: To MALES, the world is a MOUNTAIN… to Climb and Conquer! Resultant Behaviors Approach Life as a Continuous Contest You Must Win to reinforce Masculine Identity Status is determined by Performance & Achievement To FEMALES, the world is a WEB… to Engage and Connect! Resultant Behaviors Approach Life as an extended Family Reunion You Must Connect to reinforce Feminine Identity Status is determined by Relationships & Linkages SLIDE #87 - Corresponds to page 66 of 2015 Manual. All the content of this slide is timed to appear – you will not need to click until ready to move on to next slide. Discussion/Comments: Once all content has appeared, elaborate & give examples of 1-2 male & female perspectives. Manual Page 66 Slide #87

25 4 – Coaching Philosophy: Gender Matters – What Coaches Need to Know
Deconstructing the Final Timeout… …MALES (Karch) BATTLE to BOND Premium on Proving Self Motivational Language REINFORCED Karch and his teammates …FEMALES (Susan) BOND to BATTLE Premium on Connecting Self Same Motivational Language SEPARATED Susan from her teammates Photos provided by the FIVB SLIDE #88 - Corresponds to page of 2015 Manual. Everything on this slide is timed to appear. Discussion/Comments: Emphasize the BATTLE TO BOND – BOND TO BATTLE concept …. ESPECIALLY the guys coaching girls need to pay attention to this if nothing else! Coaches of Boys still need intentionally work on TEAM BONDING/BUILDING….just in ways different from girls team’s. Quote from Hugh McCutcheon: "With the men, so much of it is getting through the ego, getting to the core where they are willing to be vulnerable enough to admit they need to make changes," he says. "With the women, there is a lot of fear and insecurity, so it's more about validating and helping people build trust so they feel like they belong out there." Manual Page 66-67 Slide #88

26 4 – Coaching Philosophy: Gender Matters – What Coaches Need to Know
SELF CONFIDENCE/FEEDBACK/CRITICISM “I spend most of my time working to convince each boy that I coach that he is not quite as good as he thinks he is. I spend most of my time working to convince each girl that I coach that she is better than she thinks she is.” ~ USA National Team Soccer Coach ~ MALES tend to Deflect CRITICISM and Internalize PRAISE. Be direct, specific and individual in giving feedback Effectiveness based on your ability to improved skills, winning percentage, & opportunities for advancement. FEMALES tend to DEFLECT Praise and INTERNALIZE Criticism. Be caring, careful with anger, and analytical in giving feedback Effectiveness in your ability to relate, show you care about them beyond their ability to contribute, and that you can keep the team connected. BOTH genders need their coaches to: Praise in Public and Criticize in Private Talk their Language in Motivation, Criticism and Feedback. Be Sensitive to Athletes that do not fit their Gender Stereotype SLIDE #89- Corresponds to page of 2015 Manual. “MALES” line is clicked and everything else on this slide is timed to appear. Note that the information will fade in and then out, however on the printed slide pages all text appears. Manual Page 66-68 Slide #89

27 4 – Coaching Philosophy: Gender Matters – What Coaches Need to Know
“The challenge of Coaching [both males and females] is to prepare a team in a Left-Brain environment (Practice) to perform in a Right-Brain environment (Competition).” ~ Mary Jo Peppler ~ PRACTICE vs. COMPETITION Integrative Big Picture Focused Outcome Driven: method is irrelevant; find a way, whatever it takes Reactive Response to Situation Player Focused: Primarily Spatial & Perceptive Feedback Analytical Detail Focused Process Oriented: part-whole, step by step breakdowns Response to Repetitive Drilling Coach Centered: Primarily Verbal Feedback vs SLIDE #90 - Corresponds to page of 2015 Manual. Click to bring in “Practice vs Comp” line. “Practice” bullet list is timed and after “Integrative” on the Competition side everything else is clicked to appear to allow for audience participation on the comparison of Practice vs. Competition. Discussion/Comments: Before clicking on “Integrative”, Ask audience for suggestions for each comparative point. Ask the audience which side appears to have more traits associated with females and which has more traits associated with males. (Answer: practice equals female and competition equals male). Manual Page 66-68 Slide #90

28 4 – Coaching Philosophy: Gender Matters – What Coaches Need to Know
~ Coaching Ramifications and Challenges ~ Female Teams tend to Engage in More “Count” Drills; Male Teams tend to Engage in More “Compete” Drills. ~ Bill Neville ~ The Female worldview is more compatible with success in Coach-directed, Repetitive Drilling activities (Practice). The Male worldview is more compatible with success in Game-like, Player-directed activities (Competition). 8 For Best Results, Train the COMPLETE ATHLETE … For Women/Girls’ Teams: Practice COMPETING and be intentional about leadership development; Balance with PROCESS-ORIENTED Drills so they stay connected. For Men/Boys’ Teams: Practice TECHNIQUE and be intentional about relationship development; Balance with COMPETITIVE Drills so they stay edgy! For more information and/or conversation on this topic go to: SLIDE #91 - Corresponds to page of 2015 Manual. Everything on this slide is timed to appear, then disappear. However, in the printed slides all text will appear. Discussion/Comments: Remind audience that they can purchase Kathy’s HIGHLY RECOMMENDED book on the USAV website. Click to proceed to next slide. Photo by FIVB Manual Page 67-68 Slide #91

29 4 – Coaching Philosophy: Chapter Review
“What is my REVISED Coaching Philosophy?” Knowing what you know now, take a moment & revise on page 68 what you wrote earlier. Now we will move on to talk about how to apply the SCIENCE to the ART of coaching in Chapter 5: Motor Learning Theory. Photo provided by Bill Hamiter SLIDE #92 - Corresponds to page 68 of 2015 Manual. Discussion/Comments – NOW invite participants to take another look at what they wrote on page 45 and take a couple of minutes to REVISE their Philosophy here. As they are doing so, ask for a couple of volunteers to share something they think they will change about how they approach coaching. Remind students of Additional resources list for this chapter on page 67. Manual Page 68 Slide #92

30 USA VOLLEYBALL’s NFHS Online Coaching Course
ONLINE COURSE Skill Video Demos Key Positions & Teaching Cues Teaching & Coaching Tips Sample Drills Printable Handouts And MUCH more! Counts as 2 CAP Modules Cost is $75.00! Slide #93– Display for a few seconds & mention website address….intro to the NFHS online course – Fundamentals of Coaching Volleyball. Before moving to the BREAK slide (#94) Mention: -USAV Education wrote/created in cooperation with NFHS and AVCA. -Coaches should check to see if their school and/or HS Association will accept for certification! -On-Screen Hosts are Kevin Barnett and Deitre Collins-Parker – both former Olympians -Aimed at new/beginner level coaches -Carries 2 CAP Module Credits for re-certification purposes. -Cost is $75.00! Does Your School/State Association accept this course for certification?! ASK THEM TO! Slide #93

31 “HALF-TIME” BREAK! SLIDE #94 - is a TRANSITION or BREAK SLIDE….you do not need to show it, but you may if you break at this point. Discussion/Comments: This is a good time to have folks write on a slip of paper any questions they have at this point & you can pull a couple to answer as people are taking their seats from a break… Slide #94


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