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InclusionInclusion Raising the attainment of all pupils, including those with SEN, is a whole school responsibility. Awena Bosley Inclusion Co-ordinator.

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Presentation on theme: "InclusionInclusion Raising the attainment of all pupils, including those with SEN, is a whole school responsibility. Awena Bosley Inclusion Co-ordinator."— Presentation transcript:

1 InclusionInclusion Raising the attainment of all pupils, including those with SEN, is a whole school responsibility. Awena Bosley Inclusion Co-ordinator

2 The Inclusion Register

3 How are students identified? By base line assesments – CATs, SATs, reading and spelling scores Primary liaison Concerns expressed by subject staff Parents concerns Outside agencies

4 National Curriculum Inclusion statement This statement contains 3 principles that are Setting suitable learning challenges Responding to students diverse learning needs. Overcoming potential barriers to learning QCA/DfEE (1999) Inclusion: Providing effective learning opportunities for all pupils

5 Disability Discrimination Act (1995) Education Act (1996) SEN and Disability Act (2001) These are designed to ensure access to education and the inclusion of disabled students in every aspect of school life. It requires schools to make reasonable adjustments to ensure that disabled students are not disadvantaged by their disability. The DDA defines a disabled person as someone who has ‘ a physical or mental impairment which has substantial and long term adverse effect on his or her ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.’

6 Every Child Matters The ECM Agenda should drive the ethos and the vision of your classroom practice Being Healthy Staying Safe Enjoying and Achieving Making a positive contribution Economic wellbeing

7 Your responsibilities Identification of pupils’ needs will support the effective design of lessons to personalise the learning and ensure progress for pupils with SEN. It is the responsibility of the InCo to identify their needs and inform staff. It is the duty of staff to access that information through the Inclusion ( Special Needs) Register and IEPs, and act on it by planning appropriate teaching approaches.

8 Assessment for Learning AfL When assessment for learning is well established in a classroom, pupils are: actively involved in their own learning; able to judge the success of their work and understand targets for improvement; able to take responsibility for their own progress…………….. Regardless of their diverse learning needs!!

9 Types of Difficulties students might have in your classroom Dyslexic (Specific Learning Difficulties) Dyspraxic (Fine and gross motor difficulties) Visual/hearing impaired ASD – Autisitic spectrum disorder (Aspergers) ADHD – Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder BESD behaviour/emotional/social difficulties SLCN – speech and language/communication difficulties GLD – Global learning difficulties BEWARE NEGATIVITY!!

10 Why inclusion? There is clear evidence that lower-attaining pupils learn more effectively in mixed ability settings because working together with more able pupils develops communication skills and social skills such as adaptability, tolerance and turn-taking. It is desirable that most learning for pupils with SEN and disability takes place in the social context of the mainstream classroom.

11 Approaches to learning and teaching in the mainstream classroom One of the most limiting factors for pupil with SEN or disability as learners is being rendered overly dependent on adults to help them learn. Many pupils with learning difficulties lack self- confidence. Pupils need opportunities to apply their skills, working collaboratively with other pupils and independently.

12 All pupils need to move from dependence on the teacher, through modelled, shared and guided group activities to a point where they are sufficiently skilled and confident to work independently. The InCo promotes teaching that represents the move from dependence on the teacher to independent study.

13 What do good inclusive teachers do? Inclusive teachers believe that all pupils in all classes have an entitlement to effective teaching that raises their learning attainment. They plan lessons carefully so that all pupils: are able to participate; can access the key learning at their own level; take some new learning away with them.

14 Good inclusive teachers will Set suitable learning challenges Respond to student’s diverse learning needs Overcome barriers to learning by making reasonable adjustments

15 In successful lessons, pupils are made aware of: what is to be learned; How this fits in with what they already know. Helping pupils maximise learning: Currently, far fewer pupils with SEN make sufficient progress at Key Stage 3 compared with others in their peer group. All pupils, including those with SEN, respond to a positive learning environment where there are high expectations through: a belief in what may be possible; a view of ability as flexible not fixed.

16 Designing lessons Identification of pupils’ needs will support the effective design of lessons to personalise the learning and ensure progress for pupils with SEN. It is the responsibility of the InCo to identify their needs and inform staff. It is the duty of staff to access that information through the inclusion register and IEPs and act on it.

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19 If something‘s rotating –you need a break!

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22 The phenomenal power of the human mind I cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdanieg The phaonmneal pweor of the hmuan mnid! Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer inwaht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be in the rghit pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. Amzanig huh? Yaeh, and I awlyas thought slpeling was ipmorantt.

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24 Look at the cross a bit longer and you‘ll notice that all dots except the green one will disappear. Concentrate on the cross in the middle, after a while you will notice that this moving purple dot will turn green!

25 Making reasonable adjustments Good practice in the classroom may include Good liaison with support staff Planning and differentiating work Considering student grouping Developing peer working Reviewing and evaluating progress regularly Working with InCo and outside agencies

26 Glossopdale, PE

27 Structuring learning Low-attaining pupils often benefit from lessons that are structured into a number of shorter chunks. Each of these episodes will need distinct outcomes, shared with the pupils and may require a mini- plenary. Teachers will need to deploy a range of different approaches and teaching strategies that address the type of objective and match the maturity of the pupils in order to meet learning needs. Bloom’s taxonomy

28 George Green’s, Maths

29 Learning styles: helping to remove barriers to learning To accommodate the preferred learning styles of pupils with SEN, teachers need support from the INCO to: have a clear understanding of what these are; provide learning opportunities on a regular basis that address the full range of learning styles within the class; know how to create a match between the nature of the learning and the learning style of the pupil; take account of pupils who have one main style, ensure that they can access the learning but encourage them to develop learning within other styles; provide some degree of choice of activity.

30 Acknowledging learning styles The Dunn and Dunn model contains 5 learning style domains Environmental - sound, light, temperature, design Emotional – motivation, persistence, responsibility, structure Sociological- learning by self, pairs, team, and with an adult Physiological- perceptual preference, food and drink intake, time of day, mobility Psychological – global or analytical preferences, impulsive and reflective

31 St Augustines, Maths

32 Frome Community College, Frome

33 Assessment for learning: a whole-school approach When assessment for learning is well established in a classroom, pupils are: actively involved in their own learning; able to judge the success of their work and understand targets for improvement; able to take responsibility for their own progress.

34 Making best use of additional support within the classroom Clearly the role of additional adults is more effective when they are involved in the planning about how individual pupils can be included and engaged in the lesson. At the very least the supporting adult will need to know the learning objectives the expected learning outcome the tasks and activities planned for the pupils in the lesson.

35 Is it another word for SEN and the Gifted and Talented still get overlooked? Runs contrary to the prevalent medical model of SEN where the child is deficient and not the rest of his / her environment Beware the hidden exclusion – withdrawal sessions or internal segregation – the ‘Turtles’ table A process and not a result A financial challenge – and therein lies the rub! Impossible to totally effect particularly if not all agencies involved are of the same mindset and belief in its truth A whole school issueNo good if the teachers are not empowered to deliver Not workable when the educational model that drives the school is curriculum delivery rather than child-centred Not necessarily for those you want to include so much as the rest of the class recognising and accepting difference A mindset – but is it enough to like the idea of it? An emotional response such as compassion and belief but do we all experience these in the same way? Humiliating for some – to be seen as different by peers – something educators do not always consider Receiving due entitlementDoes it give the best for the middle range ability children as we grapple with the extremes? Is only possible when looking at all your class not just the SEN children Something that may not actually be the best for those in the most need. Their own setting, peers and a tailored curriculum may benefit these pupils more. A fundamental belief in the attainability of equality Tolerance towards difference Particularly demanding with pupils with challenging behavoiur


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