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New Ingredients for Student Success Bob Pearlman

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1 New Ingredients for Student Success Bob Pearlman Harris County Education Technology Forum: Education, Business & Technology Converge for a Greater Houston Region Houston, October 1, 2002

2 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Good News and Bad News

3 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success

4 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success

5 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Inaugurated October 1, 2002

6 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Fall, 2000 – The Dot.Com bust Spring, 2001 – The Technology and Telecommunications sectors go bust Fall, 2001 to present – The Blue Chips drop 50% The First Recession of the New Millennium

7 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success

8 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Houston 4 th largest city in U.S. 10 th biggest Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (CMSA) in U.S.

9 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success

10 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success

11 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success

12 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Internet Cluster Regions – U.S. Boston “Route 128” Boston “Route 128” New York — “Silicon Alley” New York — “Silicon Alley” Washington, D.C. “Silicon Dominion” Austin — “Silicon Hills” Austin — “Silicon Hills” Seattle — “Silicon Forest” Seattle — “Silicon Forest” Research Triangle “Silicon Triangle” Chicago “Silicon City” Chicago “Silicon City” Miami “Silicon Beach” Atlanta “Capital of the New South” Los Angeles “Digital Coast” San Francisco “Multimedia Gulch” San Francisco “Multimedia Gulch” Silicon Valley

13 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Global Internet Cluster Regions Japan “Bit Valley” Canada “Silicon Valley North” United Kingdom “Silicon Kingdom” Scandinavia “Wireless Valley” Germany “Silicon Saxony” France “Telecom Valley” Israel “Silicon wadi” China/Hong Kong “Cyber Port” India Singapore “Intelligent Island” United States

14 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Silicon Valley, % of workforce in 7 high-tech clusters

15 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success VALLEY OF HEART’S DELIGHT Silicon Valley, 1970

16 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success What region or regions will be best poised to grow during the next recovery?

17 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success What’s the connection between economic success and student success?

18 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Workforce Gap What Workforce Gap? The

19 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success The workforce gap in the Silicon Valley has widened from 160,000 in 1997 to 216,000 in Most alarming is the increase in the levels of unfilled positions Note:(1) Data is as of 10/2000. The total demand for high-tech industry clusters was 468,000 in 1997 Source: A.T. Kearney Analysis, Workforce Study Commuters Outside Recruits Unfilled Positions Estimated Gap For High-Tech Industry Clusters (In Thousands) Total Demand For High-Tech Industry Clusters Local Labor and Voluntary Movers 62% Unfilled Positions 11% Outside Recruits 7% Commuters 21% 100% = 570,000 (1)

20 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success The incremental costs to businesses in the Silicon Valley due to this workforce “gap” have escalated to over $6 billion annually Opportunity Costs 56% Hiring Costs 2% Turn-over Costs 16% Salary Premium 26% Opportunity Costs Turn- over Costs Hiring Costs Salary Premium Source: A.T. Kearney Analysis, Workforce Study Annual Workforce Gap Costs ($ Billions) Incremental Cost Components (%) 100% = $5.2-$6.6 billions

21 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Education => Student Success The Old Formula:

22 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success The Student Success Multiple Choice Test: 1 A I learned little in high school B I learned a lot in High School C I learned a lot in high school and can show evidence of my work in my Digital Portfolio on the web

23 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success The Student Success Multiple Choice Test: 2 A I did not work in a job while I was in high school B I had some jobs while I was in High School C I had an internship in my field of interest while I was in high school

24 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success The Student Success Multiple Choice Test: 3 A I never made an oral presentation B I made an oral presentation, but I’m afraid to speak in front of a group C I have no qualms in speaking before a group. I’ve done it many times.

25 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success The Student Success Multiple Choice Test: 4 A I don’t know what I want to do after high school B I’m going to college. I’m not sure what I’ll major in. C I’m going to college. I know what I want to study.

26 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success The Student Success Multiple Choice Test: 5 A I don’t use technology for my schoolwork B I occasionally use technology for my schoolwork C I use technology tools all the time to do my work and present it

27 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success The Student Success Multiple Choice Test:6 A I can’t connect to my school network from home B I can log onto my school network from home and see my assignments C I can log onto my school network from home, see my assignments and grades, and do my work. And so can my parents

28 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success The Student Success Multiple Choice Test: 7 A I never work with other students B A few times I worked with other students on an assignment C Not always but most of the time we collaborate with other students (and sometimes adults) on a project.

29 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success The Student Success Multiple Choice Test: 8 A School is boring B I am very busy with my schoolwork, but mostly bored by it C I am really engaged in my projects, my internship, and my college classes

30 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success The Student Success Multiple Choice Test: 9 A To graduate I had to pass most of my courses B To graduate I had to pass all of my courses C To graduate I had to pass all of my courses and present oral, written, and digital evidence of what I know and can do.

31 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success The Student Success Multiple Choice Test: 10 A I don’t know any adults other than my parents who could help me B I know adults— relatives, friends, community members– that could probably help me C I know adults— relatives, friends, community members,, and supervisors– who have mentored me in my school projects, at work, and in planning for college and career

32 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success So what does this mean for preparing kids? The three concerns… Our kids need opportunities to learn (Education – Preparing Kids for College and Careers) We need better skilled workers (Workforce Development) It’s my own kids (get them out of the house when they reach their mid-20s)

33 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success BOOMERANG GENERATION “We reared our children, educated them, threw them out into the big world and what did they do? They came back home by the millions!” -- Dr. Charles V. Petty, President, Family Success Unlimited The latest census figures indicate that more than 80 million so-called “empty nesters” now find themselves with at least one grown child at home

34 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success So what do kids need to know and be able to do?

35 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success SCANS Workplace Know-How (1991) Competencies – effective workers can productively use: Resources -- identifying, organizing, planning, and allocating time, money, materials, and workers; Interpersonal Skills -- negotiating, exercising leadership, working with diversity, teaching others new skills, serving clients and customers, and participating as a team member; Information Skills -- using computers to process information and acquiring and evaluating, organizing and maintaining, and interpreting and communicating information; Systems Skills -- understanding systems, monitoring and correcting system performance, and improving and designing systems; and Technology utilization skills -- selecting technology, applying technology to a task, and maintaining and troubleshooting technology. Source: What Work Requires of School, 1991, Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills, U.S. Department of Labor

36 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success SCANS Workplace Know-How (1991) The Foundation – competence requires: Basic Skills -- reading, writing, speaking, listening, and knowing arithmetic and mathematical concepts; Thinking Skills -- reasoning, making decisions, thinking creatively, solving problems, seeing things in the mind's eye, and knowing how to learn; and Personal Qualities -- responsibility, self-esteem, sociability, self- management, integrity, and honesty.

37 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Written for NCREL by Cheryl Lemke, Metiri Group Sources: What Work Requires of School, 1991, Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills, U.S. Department of Labor A Nation of Opportunity: Building America's 21st Century Workforce, 2000, 21st Century Workforce Commission, U.S. Congress Preparing Students for the 21st Century, 1996, American Association of School Administrators

38 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Job Outlook 2002, National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE)

39 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Working in the Real World (i.e. California?) Projects, projects, projects Teamwork and collaboration Self-direction Interpersonal skills No one asks about your formal education

40 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success So how do students get these skills? Do students want to get these skills?

41 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success 2002 Workforce Study 1999 Workforce Study found that Silicon Valley faced a significant workforce gap, costing industry $3-4 billion a year Gap was composed of losses from unfilled positions plus additional salary premiums for workers linked to outside recruitment and commuting costs 2000, CA State Senator John Vasconcellos called “our workforce gap … the number one crisis facing Silicon Valley today”. Could a homegrown workforce fill the gap? Were local students interested in careers in the technology industry?

42 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success High-tech employment includes not only employment in high-tech clusters, but also employment in technology positions across all traditional industries Finance Human Resources Accounting Marketing Sales Customer service Database Development/ Administration Digital Media Enterprise Systems Analysis/Integration Network Design/ Administration Programming/Software Engineering Technical Support Technical Writing Web Development/ Administration Production Logistics Warehouse operations Inventory management Others High-tech Clusters Finance Human Resources Accounting Marketing Sales Customer service Database Development/ Administration Digital Media Enterprise Systems Analysis/Integration Network Design/ Administration Programming/Software Engineering Technical Support Technical Writing Web Development/ Administration Production Logistics Warehouse operations Inventory management Other Banking Industry Finance Human Resources Accounting Marketing Sales Customer service Database Development/ Administration Digital Media Enterprise Systems Analysis/Integration Network Design/ Administration Programming/Software Engineering Technical Support Technical Writing Web Development/ Administration Production Logistics Warehouse operations Inventory management Other Construction Industry Finance Human Resources Accounting Marketing Sales Customer service Database Development/ Administration Digital Media Enterprise Systems Analysis/Integration Network Design/ Administration Programming/Software Engineering Technical Support Technical Writing Web Development/ Administration Production Logistics Warehouse operations Inventory management Other Other Traditional Industries Note:(1)High-tech industry clusters, which includes Semiconductor, Computer/Communications, Software, Bioscience, Aerospace and Defense, Innovation/Manufacturing Services and Professional Services (2)Estimates of the preceding workforce gap do not include high-tech employment in horizontal industries Source: A.T. Kearney Analysis, ITAA, AEA Job function Employment in Vertical IndustriesEmployment in Horizontal Industries

43 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success However, motivation to pursue hi-tech careers is low among students; over half of the students expressed unfavorable perceptions about technology careers Source: A.T. Kearney analysis, Student Survey Most Cited Reasons for Motivation Gap (% of those responded “not interested”) “People working with computers don’t really have a life…” 11th Grader “Computers are too complicated and hard to learn…” 11th Grader “I don’t want to sit in front of a computer all day…” 8th Grader “Computers are pretty boring…” 11th Grader

44 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Source: A.T. Kearney analysis, Student Survey High access to computer and the Internet at home and public schools No correlation between access and awareness and motivation to pursue technology careers Motivation gap is especially pronounced among students Contrary to popular belief, the digital divide in Silicon Valley has less to do with access to technology, and more to do with factors that prepare and motivate students to pursue technology careers Student’s Motivation Gap

45 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Of the 32% students that are motivated to pursue hi-tech careers very few are girls Desire to pursue a technology career by Gender (1) Note: (1) Student surveys (2) Enrollment in University of California, Berkeley Source: A.T. Kearney analysis, California Department of Education, AAUW Educational Foundation Research Female Male Technology Related Overall College Enrollment by Gender (2) Plan to pursue technology careers Want to work in technology fields Female Male

46 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success The key driver of career motivation is the social network in which students gain access and exposure to information, knowledge and opportunities through members of the network Parents Summer Jobs/ Internships Media SchoolRelationships Individual Members of Social Network Source:Student Survey, A.T. Kearney analysis Most individuals obtain knowledge about careers through family, friends and mentors Students express a strong preference to careers similar to their parents’ careers Summer jobs have no future career context or experience Internships are experienced by so few that no conclusions could yet be reached Many individuals obtain career information form books, magazines, Internet, TV and other media Higher performing schools generate more interest in technology careers High correlationModerate correlationTo be determined in future studies

47 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Motivation Indexes (1) by Socioeconomic Groupings To quantify the combined impact on motivation by the various social network elements, the motivation index has been developed. The index indicates the motivation for technology careers is higher among higher socioeconomic groups Note: (1) 0-.2 = very weak; 2-.4 = weak;.4-.6 = moderate;.6-.8 = strong;.8-1: very strong (2) Motivation index for technology careers = 1 - Motivation index for traditional careers Source:A.T. Kearney analysis, California Department of Education, California Postsecondary Education Commission Traditional careers motivation index Technology careers motivation index (2) The motivation index for traditional careers varies but remains strong across all socioeconomic situations

48 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Summary of findings The workforce gap in Silicon Valley, comprised of unfilled positions, outside recruits and commuters, has increased by over 25% since 1997 and cost business more than $6 billion a year in High access does not appear to translate into high awareness of or motivation to pursue technology careers. Motivation to pursue technology careers is less among females than males. Social networks for technology acclimation drive an individual’s motivation and preparation to pursue technology careers There are fewer technology related networking opportunities for Hispanics and African Americans than for Asians and Whites. “Social networks that can bridge across geography, race and class are key to success in the new economy. ‘Hard’ skills are essential, but it’s the connections and mentoring that provide information about what skills are necessary and a vision of how acquiring them can lead to new opportunities for all our residents”. -- Professor Manuel Pastor, Jr., University of California, Santa Cruz

49 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success "The 2002 Workforce Study emphasizes that a cooperative regional effort is needed to expand the social networks that connect young people with the Silicon Valley jobs of tomorrow. We must ensure that young people of all backgrounds have access to accurate, reliable information on high-tech careers and have relationships with role models and other adults who can provide valuable career-related guidance.“ -- Rebecca Guerra, Vice President, Worldwide Human Resources at Riverstone Networks

50 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success … and how will they get these skills? Awareness Interest Motivation Preparation

51 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Strategies that Make a Difference Engagement Hands-on Adult connections Internships Real World immersion

52 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Education => Student Success + Skills (Hard + Soft) + Social Networks The New Formula:

53 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success So how do you enhance a student’s social network?

54 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success The Teenage Ghetto – in school and on-the-job

55 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Napa New Technology High School student Stephanie Chu points to her office door at Net-Flow Internet Solutions. Before coming to Net-Flow as an intern, she didn’t know what she wanted to do in her career or what to study in college. “Now I get paid for what I like to do”, she says. Her boss, Dean, wants her to continue working with them while in college by telecommuting. Stephanie Chu

56 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success “After High School, that’s it, I’m out of here”, says Oscar Kegal, a Hispanic student from San Francisco’s Mission High. But after taking part in the Cisco Networking Academy and interning at M Squared, Inc., Kegal says he is going to college and will be successful. His supervisor, M Squared principal Claire McAulliffe, is impressed with the level of work that young people can do. “Maybe one day I will own my own networking company,” Oscar says. Oscar Kegal

57 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success “My nickname was ‘Trouble’”, says Aiyahnna Johnson, an African- American student at Oakland Tech. “When I was accepted into the Health Academy I started to think more about school and what I wanted to do”. Her supervisor/mentor at the Eastmont Wellness Center, Sandra Williams, expects Aiyahnna to become an obstetrician or gynecologist and to return to work at the Wellness Center and become a community leader. Aiyahnna Johnson

58 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Internships Major impact on high school performance Major impact on Post-secondary success

59 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Concerns about internships Kids will not behave on the job Kids in the workplace will take too much supervision Companies will lose both time and money

60 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success 400+ full-time high school interns since 1993 Up to 50 annually Company, maker of AutoCAD, employs 1800 in Marin County, California Win-Win for students and the company

61 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Intuitions Confirmed...The Bottom Line Return on School-to-Work Investment for Students and Employers This important study details impact on: Higher Academic Achievement Better College Preparation Reduced Training & Supervision Increased Retention Increased Hires Better Attendance Reduced Recruitment Costs Reduced Turnover Higher Productivity Benefits-Cost Ratios Autodesk ROI: $2.32 return for each dollar invested in the Autodesk high school intern program

62 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Mentoring can also play a key role. Organizations like International Telementor (http://www.telementor.org/) and BeAMentor (http://www.beamentor.org/) link students with long-term mentors in the workplace by telecommunications. These telementors consult with students on their projects and advise students on their college and career plans.http://www.telementor.org/http://www.beamentor.org/ The best youth programs today connect students with caring adults. Intel’s Computer Clubhouses (http://www.computerclubhouse.org/), based on a design developed by the Boston Museum of Science, provides middle school students with a technology-rich after-school “workplace” and provides each student with an adult mentor.http://www.computerclubhouse.org/ Another way to connect students is to help their teachers become effective networkers. Programs such as IISME (Industry Initiatives in Science and Math Education, provide teachers with 6-8 week summer internships at technology companies. The experience not only updates teacher skills and provides them with new curriculum ideas, it also connects them with the industry contacts that can provide social networking opportunities for their kids.http://iisme.org/ Programs and Strategies that Enhance a Student’s Social Network

63 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success New Technology High School Napa, California  Integrating technology into every class  Interdisciplinary and project-based  Internship class consisting of classroom curriculum and unpaid work in technology, business or education  Digital Portfolio TED FUJIMOTO, JOANNE MILLER, AND MARK S. MORRISON, DIRECTOR

64 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success When I asked a student what was different about this school and the school she had come from, she said “this school will prepare me to be a community leader”. -- Alan November, September 2002, visit to New Tech High School

65 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success TECHNOLOGY TOOLS FOR …  Learning  Curriculum  Communication  Assessment  Scalability* Computerized Tutorials On-Line Curriculum E-Library Academic Systems Document Libraries Project Design Template Project Standardization Digital Textbooks Student Parent E-Bulletin Online Curriculum Internship Coordination Digital Gradebooks Student Journals Collaboration Database Learning Logs PBL Unit Library Customizable Templates Support Databases Account Management

66 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success New Technology HS LEARNING OUTCOMES TECHNOLOGY LITERACY COLLABORATION CRITICAL THINKING ORAL COMMUNICATION WRITTEN COMMUNICATION CAREER PREPARATION CITIZENSHIP AND ETHICS CURRICULAR LITERACY (CONTENT STANDARDS)

67 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success

68 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success

69 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Personalization Projects Exhibitions Digital Portfolios Internships Technology Reinvent the High School Experience!

70 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success So what can business and community leaders do?

71 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success What Business and Community Leaders Can Do… Become Board Members and Industry Advisory Board Members Sponsor Internships, Job Shadows Teachers in the Workplace Mentor kids Work with Teachers and Students on Projects

72 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success Houston Area Technology Advancement Center (HATAC) Make the Houston region THE skill and knowledge center of the United States/world Business-to-Education-to-Business (B2E2B) Create economic prosperity for all socioeconomic stakeholders by fashioning a Business-to-Education- to-Business (B2E2B) feedback loop that facilitates high tech skill and knowledge solutions from area educators to satisfy skill and knowledge needs from the business community. This effort will enhance the growth of high tech economic development capabilities within the Houston area.

73 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success What else business can do….. Lead the Dialogue (Bay Area Council, Greater Boston Technology Initiative) Inform the Region (Joint Venture: Silicon Valley Network) Build the B2E2B Coalition for Change (Boston Compact, Silicon Valley Challenge 2000: 21 st Century Education Initiative, Boston’s LINC2—Learning and Information Network for the Community)

74 _Macros New Ingredients for Student Success GET READY FOR THE RECOVERY ! Bob Pearlman "New Ingredient for Student Success: Social Networks", GET CONNECTED! BUILD THE B2E2B COALITION!


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